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Old 09-02-2006, 04:28 PM   #1
Andrew B.
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For B/W conversion, here is a method I picked up from one of the Russell Brown tutorials:

Add two hue/saturation layer masks. On the top one, turn saturation all way down. On the lower of the two, set it to Color blending mode. And it is in this lower one where you will do all your adjusting. For example, the hue slider takes you through the range of color-to-bw filters. The saturation slider affects the intensity. Using the drop down in the hue/saturation adjustment layer lets you target one color in the conversion. And using the range sliders at the bottom of the hue/saturation adjustment layer lets you adjust the range of color that is targeted.

In many ways, this method is much easier and more powerful.

Last edited by Andrew B.; 09-02-2006 at 04:32 PM. Reason: corrected mistake
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Old 09-03-2006, 02:12 PM   #2
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Sounds like a most intriguing approach...will play with this...

Thanks!

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Old 09-04-2006, 06:38 AM   #3
Cristen Gillespie
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Sounds like a most intriguing approach...will play with this...

Thanks!

Terrie
Russsel Brown's method really is a lot of fun. The Color blend mode layer is acting like a traditional filter on the lens for a film camera. Expensive plugins often let you add a "filter" for B&W conversion and this mimics that very nicely.

   
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Old 09-04-2006, 11:17 AM   #4
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cristen: Russsel Brown's method really is a lot of fun.
Fun is good...'-}}

I usually find Russell's stuff quite useful...I'm hoping to have time to play with the approach this afternoon...

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Old 09-04-2006, 11:19 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Cristen Gillespie View Post
Russsel Brown's method really is a lot of fun. The Color blend mode layer is acting like a traditional filter on the lens for a film camera. Expensive plugins often let you add a "filter" for B&W conversion and this mimics that very nicely.
I tried it and tested against what I got from ol' Mode > Grayscale and maybe it was the image I tried it with, but I couldn't tell the diff between the best of the Russell Brown method and simply changing Mode.

I supposed I should do a lot more experimentation on lots of images, but this first test hasn't persuaded me. Mode changing takes maybe two seconds (if you're a slow mouse mover).

   
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Old 09-05-2006, 06:17 AM   #6
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I tried it and tested against what I got from ol' Mode > Grayscale and maybe it was the image I tried it with, but I couldn't tell the diff between the best of the Russell Brown method and simply changing Mode.

I supposed I should do a lot more experimentation on lots of images, but this first test hasn't persuaded me. Mode changing takes maybe two seconds (if you're a slow mouse mover).
If you mainly convert portraits to greyscale, you'll possibly not find using digital "filters" to be of any real benefit. The straight change uses heavy input from the green channel, some from the red, and almost nothing from the blue. This makes it a good general purpose conversion, but less than meeting the full potential of some kinds of images.

You're not going to want to use a deep red or orange filter on a portrait, normally, but you would on a landscape, perhaps, especially if you needed to punch up a sky. In the case of portraits, you can delete all but the green channel and often have a satisfactory conversion, so if that's what you're doing, stick with mode conversion (takes 3 keys on my Mac, no mousing about it<G>)

I have Russell, and several other B&W conversion methods, on speed dial. I'm currently enamored of one that uses Calculations. '-) But that's because I do this routinely with all types of subjects, either for the sake of creating a B&W or to use a B&W conversion layer in luminosity mode for super quick tonal adjustments.

   
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Old 09-05-2006, 06:20 AM   #7
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Terrie:
I usually find Russell's stuff quite useful.
Russell is one of the few who constantly impresses me both with how well he understands what PS is doing, and with how well he explains it. I wish he weren't doing so much video, as that's just too much for dialup.

   
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Old 09-05-2006, 11:07 AM   #8
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stick with mode conversion (takes 3 keys on my Mac, no mousing about it<G>)
Yeah, I could set it up as an action, I suppose, but I usually reserve action creation for long/multiple step procedures I'm doing lots of.

   
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Old 09-05-2006, 01:54 PM   #9
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cristen: I wish he weren't doing so much video, as that's just too much for dialup.
I haven't been to his site in a long while but I knew he was doing video and I'm assuming they aren't captioned but haven't had a chance to get over there and take a look...

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Old 09-06-2006, 05:59 AM   #10
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Yeah, I could set it up as an action, I suppose, but I usually reserve action creation for long/multiple step procedures I'm doing lots of.
The B&W conversion actions do have enough steps to make it time-consuming to do by hand. Or just to remember, since some techniques simply aren't used enough for me to remember exactly the difference that made the technique interesting to me.

But I don't run an action for a mode conversion. The 3 keystrokes are Ctrl+Cmd+G (or R, L, C). Set up in keyboard shortcuts. As a Windows user, I hate mousing in menus. I'm used to keyboard shortcuts being there through the Alt+ underlined characters. So I recreated my most used on the Mac with the Control key being the main helper.

I think most of us wind up doing *something* akin to actions or keyboard shortcuts (or scripts for those capable) to speed things up in our primary software. It just gets SO repetitious we start looking for relief<G>

   
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