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Old 09-25-2006, 01:47 AM   #1
iamback
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Default Kodak logo revisited

To revive an old thread (starting a new one because I fear some people might otherwise miss it), obviously, the new (bland) Kodak logo has not completely replaced the old one everywhere, especially not where shop owners would have to pay for replacement instead of Kodak paying for it. And maybe, some people reckon the old logo will be more easily recognized and hang on to it.

But in Beijing last week I spotted a new, unique variant (of an even older version of the logo, I think) on a little photo-processing shop that I photographed especially to show to all of you (see attachment).

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(BTW, It took me a looong time to re-find the thread about the new Kodak logo - whatever keyword search I tried brought up nothing or only very recent messages - there's something wacky with the forum search, it seems: indexing incomplete?)
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Old 09-25-2006, 02:14 AM   #2
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Love it! And welcome back.

   
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Old 09-25-2006, 05:14 AM   #3
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I wonder, are they using the logo illegally, or is the name Kadok just a mis-spelling due to lack of understanding of western characters.
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Old 09-25-2006, 07:28 AM   #4
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Originally Posted by donmcc View Post
I wonder, are they using the logo illegally, or is the name Kadok just a mis-spelling due to lack of understanding of western characters.
Oh, just a Chenglish misspelling - they do at least sell Kodak film there, I noticed some yellow boxes inside.

BTW, I also noted ads on buses using the new Kodak logo - but obviously Kodak is paying for those, not for the shop owner's sign.

   
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Old 09-25-2006, 04:51 PM   #5
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I love it! But it only makes sense in a country that writes from right to left.

In Japan you'll sometimes see lettering on the sides of cars done so that it reads from front to back of the vehicle, no matter which side you're on. On the left side, from left to right: Taxi. On the right side, ixaT

   
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Old 09-26-2006, 02:03 AM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
I love it! But it only makes sense in a country that writes from right to left.
It would - except that in this case I think the sign painter has simply garbled the letters from a sample (s)he was given (note that the capital is still on the left - that suggests to me the painter was working from an example). I've seen totally garbled texts looking like they were "typeset" based on handwritten or maybe typewritten copy, with the English text sometimes still easily recognizable (if you realize that 'r' + 'n' can become 'm', etc.) but also here and there deteriorating into completely unrecognizable words. (I hope I'll have a photo later...)

Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg
In Japan you'll sometimes see lettering on the sides of cars done so that it reads from front to back of the vehicle, no matter which side you're on. On the left side, from left to right: Taxi. On the right side, ixaT
Oh, but the Chinese do this as well - it comes from writing vertically from right to left, but with the vertical lines being only a single character high. The way Latin characters have been intergrated into Chinese script, it's completely logical to them, but for me at least it took a while to work out what mechanism was behind these weird-looking texts. I photographed a nice example last year in Xining: the inside of a glass door of a bank's branch office (attached).

BTW, I noted that Korean (at least in the North) is sometimes written vertically as well, even though with a letter-syllabic script like they have that makes much less sense to me than with a (originally) ideographic script like Chinese. I suspect there's a Chinese (calligraphic) influence here. (Not sure if I have an example - I took so many pictures...)
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Old 09-26-2006, 12:58 PM   #7
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The bank example .... exactly it.
But other than the capitalization, the Kadok logo is a perfect backwards run. I imagine our notion of U/C vs l/c is something of a mystery to C/J/K speakers who haven't studied any western languages. There's nothing similar in Japanese (nor Chinese as far as I know).

Korea was once a client state of China and used the same writing system; it's morphed into something quite different (as has Japanese, which has become something different from either and are we confused yet?) But you knew all this. ;-)

   
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Old 09-26-2006, 10:11 PM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Rindsberg View Post
Korea was once a client state of China and used the same writing system; it's morphed into something quite different (as has Japanese, which has become something different from either and are we confused yet?) But you knew all this. ;-)
Indeed at one time Chinese script was used in Korea (in various ways) but it didn't "morph" into anything: the Korean script was designed from the ground up in the middle ages (in the 15th century) during the reign of the enlightened King Sejong (r.1418-1450) who reasoned that everyone should be able to read and write. It's practically unchanged since then, only slightly simplified with a few of the original letters dropped. Being scientifically designed by King Sejong's scholars, it has a beautiful logic to it and is actually quite easy to learn - which has resulted in a very high literacy rate in Korea since the script was introduced. (A little more here for instance.)

So easy to learn in fact, that during the only 10 (and very busy) days I was there, I learned to decipher and pronounce most of it (I only didn't master some of the combination consonants) - if I had known the language as a child learns it before learning to read I would have been able to read most of it! It was fun, and also handy, being able to read road signs (P'yŏngyang 15km - ah! we're nearly there) and some text on packaging (in sam cha = ginseng tea). It was also fun to recognize some loan words from English, such as sha-wo (shower, on a package with a shower cap) and rin-s (rinse, on bottles) encountered in the hotel bathrooms.

   
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