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Old 01-12-2007, 02:10 PM   #1
marlene
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Default Paper trimmers

I need to trim a bunch of color printouts I got from a service bureau. I didn't have a functional paper trimmer/cutter so I just bought an inexpensive ($50) one at Staples.

It's the guillotine type, but now I'm re-thinking my decision ... they also had rotary trimmers, and I'm thinking those must be safer.

But how well do they work? I'm cutting heavy paper, but will only be cutting one sheet at a time. And just straight cuts.

I just don't know anything about this newfangled rotary technology.

mxh
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Old 01-12-2007, 04:22 PM   #2
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We used a rotary for years in the photo lab. They work nicely for up to a few sheets of photo paper at a time and I still have all my fingers. Well, all except the little bits I've lost to matte knives.

Check a good camera/photo supply store (or printer's supply store if you have one handy). The trimmers I saw at Staples were pretty awful. Bought one that seemed ok and ended up returning it.

   
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Old 01-12-2007, 04:33 PM   #3
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Mr. Excitement, who is becoming more and more curmudgeonly in his old age, wants to know if the one you bought at Staples was rotary or guillotine.

He already opened the guillotine and he thinks it works fine. (I think it's cheap and rickety, but it does work.)

I googled a local camera/photo chain store and searched for trimmer, but all I found were things like nose hair trimmers and a "Bikini Shaper & Trimmer." (I do not want to know.)

I'm perplexed as to why a camera store sells such things, and will try to search elsewhere.

Problem is that I need to work on this project tomorrow. I had planned to use the service bureau's paper trimmer, but instead of calling me when the color prints were done, for some reason they couriered them to me.

FvH
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Old 01-12-2007, 04:33 PM   #4
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Marlene:

Quote:
But how well do they work?
Good ones work very well: I've beem using a Dahle one for the last 20 years. I set out to buy a small guillotine, but the shop assistant convinced me that the rotary type was OK by saying that the shop's owner was a photographer and used nothing else. (It was a big business, so the owner wasn't short of money.)

They're also inherently safe, which is more than you can say for hand-operated guillotines (the machine one that printing-shops use have safeguards that ensure that all the operator's fingers are not any near the guillotine).

   
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Old 01-12-2007, 05:36 PM   #5
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I think I'll just give up and use the cheap (Xacto) one for now. I can't find anywhere local that sells the Dahle (or anything else that looks better than the ones at Staples). And I don't have time to mail order since the project needs to be completed by Sunday morning.

I do worry about the safety issue with the guillotine, though.

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Old 01-12-2007, 09:23 PM   #6
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marlene View Post
I do worry about the safety issue with the guillotine, though.
One thing I dearly miss and dearly wish we'd not found a new home for before we moved was my Dahle Premium Guillotine. Look about halfway down the page at that link for the Premium version. Yes, that's what they cost, but I loved having that automatically rotating guard and the fact that the thing was self-sharpening. When I got it in the 80s I was cutting 30x40 mat and illustration board, so mine had a very large bed.

I loved that thing. <sigh>

   
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Old 01-13-2007, 12:46 AM   #7
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I do worry about the safety issue with the guillotine, though.
Good ones are constructed so that it almost impossible to cut your fingers - if not, don't buy it!

I have a small cheapo rotary cutter now (it was only EUR 15 or so) which is handy for single sheets and photographs, but I'd love to have a guillotine (but don't have either the space or the money for it). I still miss the big sturdy ones we had at the academy of arts!

   
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Old 01-13-2007, 07:09 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by marlene View Post
I do worry about the safety issue with the guillotine, though.
I have a huge, relatively inexpensive guillotine cutter, and while you could hurt yourself, I never have.

Got it at an art supply store about 30 years ago. Could use sharpening, but still going strong.

The problem is, though, that it is difficult to keep the cut true for more than 8 or 10 sheets of paper.

   
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Old 01-13-2007, 09:33 AM   #9
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Sometimes curmudgeonliness is the only reasonable response. Tell 'im I got a guillotine at Staples.

I googled on "rotary paper trimmer" and got this among others:
http://www.officezone.com/rotary1.htm

The good ones (Dahle for example) run to some money. For an occasional project, no heavy duty/production trimming, what you've got is probably the most practical deal.

   
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Old 01-13-2007, 09:42 AM   #10
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The problem is, though, that it is difficult to keep the cut true for more than 8 or 10 sheets of paper.
That's why I really liked my Dahle and it's clamping bar to hold the paper. Dang, but I wish I'd brought it with us!!

   
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