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Old 11-17-2006, 01:35 AM   #1
kazik
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Default Is this a rule in english HELP please

Hi everyone

I'm polish, and I'm just starting my DTP carrier, recently i got a client which claims that also in enlglish DTP editing you shal mov letter "a" from an edn of a line to the beggining of the next line.

Is this a rule in engish?
Example

My name is kazik. I'm 23 years old. I have a
cat. The cat is black and anoying.

Shal i move to tthe underlined letter to the beggining of the next line? Is this a mistake in english? There is a huge quarell on polish DTP forums about this! Shal it look like this?:

My name is kazik. I'm 23 years old. I have
a cat. The cat is black and anoying.
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Old 11-17-2006, 04:38 AM   #2
LoisWakeman
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It is not a rule I have ever seen, Kazik. Sometimes, a non-breaking space (for example) is used to prevent a break in an important phrase or name, but I have never worried about "a" left at the end of a line myself!
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Old 11-17-2006, 06:52 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by kazik View Post
I'm polish, and I'm just starting my DTP career, recently i got a client which claims that also in english DTP editing you shall move letter "a" from an end of a line to the beginning of the next line.

Is this a rule in engish?
Hi, Kazik,

It is not a rule in English. More important — because this has to do with typesetting, not language usage — it is also not a rule in English-language typography.

The important thing in setting type is to make the text look even, without gaps or crowded areas. That is the most important rule.

I hope this helps.



   
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Old 11-18-2006, 04:41 AM   #4
Dave Saunders
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I agree that it is not a rule, but I might force an a to the next line in ragged-right text if it stuck out like a sore thumb. In justified text, I'd never even notice.

Dave
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Old 11-18-2006, 07:35 AM   #5
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Originally Posted by Dave Saunders View Post
I agree that it is not a rule, but I might force an a to the next line in ragged-right text if it stuck out like a sore thumb. In justified text, I'd never even notice.
Sure. And even in justified text with a stack of weak right line endings — an a, a two-letter hyphenation with skinny letters (li-, say), a bunch of commas, periods, or semicolons — even in justified text I might fiddle with it.

But it is no rule, or even common practice (alas).

   
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Old 11-18-2006, 04:29 PM   #6
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Kazik
There are very few real rules in the English language that the ordainary English person worries about- and I have never heard of the rule that u have mentioned. There are common sense rules when you go over to another page - but u really make them up . What none of us like in any language is when u justify the column and you have very large word spaces. Other wise go for it What u can do on this site is post the pages (if u can) and lots of people would like to help u
Peter
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Old 11-20-2006, 12:16 AM   #7
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Thanks Everyone!!! I feel safer now. Unfortunetly I got one more question (if I may) What about (I think this is the word) dividing words at the end of a line - but not any but these that have "-" inside.
Example: Al-Aqsa, well-documented, quarter-page

Is it allowed to divide the or nor? Shall it look like this?:


My name is Kazik. History of my life is well-doumen-
ted
. I studied math for several years.

or

My name is Kazik. History of my life is
well-documented. I studied math for several years.

I hope You got what I'm worried about. May I divide word conatining "-". I the first version correct or not? Thank You for You help.
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Old 11-20-2006, 01:50 AM   #8
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This is a tricky issue that has lots of different rules. A Google on "hyphenation" turns up lots of conflicting advice! You might find this page helpful:

http://www.melbpc.org.au/pcupdate/9100/9112article4.htm

- it suggests #2 is better - though of course in fully-justified text, it might cause too much spacing to open up. In this case, I would personally edit the copy to improve the appearance. People often forget that one of the skills of the typographer is to change the words if necessary to stop the physical appearance of the text detracting from the meaning!
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Old 11-20-2006, 01:50 PM   #9
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Lois
the problem was when typesetting you couldnt make that descsion - perhaps now you can
Peter
I hate justification with large word breaks - I
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Old 11-20-2006, 02:26 PM   #10
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Quote:
Originally Posted by LoisWakeman View Post
In this case, I would personally edit the copy to improve the appearance. People often forget that one of the skills of the typographer is to change the words if necessary to stop the physical appearance of the text detracting from the meaning!
It may be one of the skills of some (though not all) typographers but many clients will not allow any alteration of the text.

   
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