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Old 03-29-2006, 01:18 AM   #1
Richard Waller
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Default English Slang

http://www.bbcamerica.com/britain/dictionary.jsp
is a useful dictionary of English/British words used in TV programs now often shown in the US. Like Little Britain for example. Did you know what 'on the pull' means for example?

   
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Old 03-29-2006, 01:42 AM   #2
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Waller
Did you know what 'on the pull' means for example?
Of course. Pretty obvious, I'd have thought, and no, I'm not British or even English.

   
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Old 03-29-2006, 03:54 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Waller
http://www.bbcamerica.com/britain/dictionary.jsp
is a useful dictionary of English/British words
Thanks - bookmarked for my collection!

   
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Old 03-30-2006, 05:40 AM   #4
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Waller
Did you know what 'on the pull' means for example?
My guess was the same as "On the Take" over here. How very wrong.

(For those who did not look it up, it means "looking for a date")

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Old 03-30-2006, 12:25 PM   #5
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Don:

My guess was the same as "On the Take" over here

How very comforting for one whose youngest daughter is a resident of Toronto!

   
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Old 03-31-2006, 01:04 PM   #6
Hugh Wyn Griffith
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Richard Waller
http://www.bbcamerica.com/britain/dictionary.jsp
is a useful dictionary of English/British words used in TV programs now often shown in the US. Like Little Britain for example. Did you know what 'on the pull' means for example?
Doesn't begin very well if you filter down to WELSH and find the first entry:
Lechyd da.





a popular toast meaning Good Health.

Pronounced yacky dah.

commonly used in Wales
submitted by BBC America

when it should be Iechyd da

Even MSN can get it right!

http://encarta.msn.com/dictionary_56...iechyd_da.html

   
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Old 03-31-2006, 03:13 PM   #7
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hugh Wyn Griffith
Doesn't begin very well if you filter down to WELSH and find the first entry:
Lechyd da.
(...)
Pronounced yacky dah.
(...)
when it should be Iechyd da
Given the imitated pronunciation (assuming that is more or less correct) that would make more sense as well ;-)

   
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Old 04-01-2006, 09:32 AM   #8
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Quote:
Originally Posted by iamback
Given the imitated pronunciation (assuming that is more or less correct) that would make more sense as well ;-)
It's close enough .....

   
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