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ktinkel
08-04-2005, 09:01 AM
My recent Veer catalog also includes a bunch of scripts, many of them designed (or co-designed) by Alejandro Paul.

I have rarely had much use for scripts in my work, but always love to look at them. Of the scripts shown in the booklet, I am drawn especially to these:
Koziupack (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000143) (by Alejandro Paul & Koziupa)
Milk Script (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000060) (by Paul & Graziani)
Ministry Script (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000149) (by Paul; includes swashes, alternates, contextual ligatures)
Mr Sheffield (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000111) (by Bluemlein & Paul)
Incognito (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=FOT0000074) (a set of 10 related scripts by Fountain Type)
Gizmo (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=GTT0000006) (by G-Type)
These are but a drop in the bucket. Veer shows 19 pages of script thumbnails (http://www.veer.com/search/results.aspx?keyword=script&producttype=TYP) in case these are not enough.

ElyseC
08-04-2005, 10:10 AM
Koziupack (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000143) (by Alejandro Paul & Koziupa)
Ministry Script (http://www.veer.com/products/typedetail.aspx?image=UMT0000149) (by Paul; includes swashes, alternates, contextual ligatures)
Those two are my favorites from your list, Ministry Script wooing me the most of the two. It is very appealing.

These are but a drop in the bucket. Veer shows 19 pages of script thumbnails (http://www.veer.com/search/results.aspx?keyword=script&producttype=TYP) in case these are not enough.Nifty roll-over samples there.

terrie
08-04-2005, 11:12 AM
Ohhhhh...those are *really* nice!!! You know what a script fontholic I am...'-}}

Terrie

ktinkel
08-04-2005, 02:01 PM
Ohhhhh...those are *really* nice!!! You know what a script fontholic I am...'-}}I do, I do. Ashamed of myself, really, for tempting you all the time. :-)

terrie
08-05-2005, 11:55 AM
ROFL!!!

Terrie

annc
08-05-2005, 02:24 PM
Those two are my favorites from your list, Ministry Script wooing me the most of the two. It is very appealing.

Nifty roll-over samples there.Yean, I'm lusting after Ministry Script too. No possible use for it, mind you.

ElyseC
08-05-2005, 03:32 PM
Yean, I'm lusting after Ministry Script too. No possible use for it, mind you.No current need for it, but it would've be very nice for several projects of the past.

annc
08-05-2005, 03:46 PM
No current need for it, but it would've be very nice for several projects of the past.maybe you could con the clients into paying for a redesign. <ggg>

ElyseC
08-05-2005, 04:37 PM
maybe you could con the clients into paying for a redesign. <ggg>I wish. <g>

tphinney
08-06-2005, 11:29 AM
I like Ministry Script. It also has a lot of OpenType contextual features going on, which is cool. However, at first blush the feature programming needs a little work.

ktinkel
08-06-2005, 11:52 AM
I like Ministry Script. It also has a lot of OpenType contextual features going on, which is cool. However, at first blush the feature programming needs a little work.How can you tell?

I haven’t actually seen the font — I was responding to its appearance, of course. But how does one evaluate the feature programming — from the description?

tphinney
08-06-2005, 12:54 PM
You can't - you have to actually work with it, or open it in a font editor.

I'm doing a talk/showing on contextual fonts at the St Bride conference in October, and I just helped with a workshop on the topic at TypeCon, so I've been studying a number of typefaces lately....

Regards,

T

ktinkel
08-06-2005, 01:37 PM
You can't - you have to actually work with it, or open it in a font editor.That’s what I figured.

It is amazing to read type critiques of the past, many of them based on specimens (or, better, in use). Of course, the technologies were less tricky, but I marvel at the ability to focus on the intricacies of type without actually working with it. All you can judge, for sure, are the strengths and weaknesses of the characters.

Nowadays, of course, you would have a tough time sorting out how well the font works out of the box (so to speak) from the way it has been set — I would hate to slam (or praise) something per se when any problems (or virtues) had been created by the user.

Life used to be nice and simple. Or so they tell me.