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ktinkel
07-23-2005, 08:03 AM
From the Saturday 23 July issue of the New York Times:
In Search of the Characters of New York

If you are not the sort of person who cares deeply about the Old World subtleties of Fournier, the retro-hipster swirl of Ministry Script or the plain-vanilla, rock-ribbed dependability of Helvetica — nor the sort immediately able to identify the typeface you are reading right now as 8.7-point Imperial — then you were probably not aware that Mayor Michael R. Bloomberg declared this week Type Week in New York City. …

Link to continuation (http://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/23/arts/design/23type.html) (requires free registration to read online)
The short feature promotes the TypeCon2005 conference that is taking place in NYC this weekend. Nice illustrations with the article, showing type in some subway stations, inscribed on buildings, and more.

This gives me an excuse to say something about calligrapher and type designer Paul Shaw, who led the typographic tour discussed in the article. He and Garrett Boge operate a digital type foundry called LetterPerfect (see LetterPerfect fonts (http://www.fontshop.com/?fuseaction=catalog.fonts&searchID=18&searchby=manufacturer) at FontShop). They used to lead the Legacy of Letters typographic tours of Rome (http://www.emodigi.de/emodigi_site/letter_per/letter.html) (the link is to an article about the designers, their work, and the tours).

The fact that both men started out as lettering artists is reflected in their fonts. (Paul, in fact, is yet another type designer who was influenced by Lloyd Reynolds and Robert Palladino at Reed College.)

Included are scripts (the lovely mostly linking Spring is especially well-known); display fonts, including the Bermuda collection; and modern versions of ancient designs, including Florentine (http://www.fontshop.com/?fuseaction=catalog.fontpackage&searchby=manufacturer&displayfontid=LP.104298.0.0), a set of three modulated-stroke inscriptional caps — Beata, Donatello, and Ghiberti — that I especially like.