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Franca
07-07-2005, 11:41 AM
I have just now read of the bombing attacks this morning in London and wanted to express my shock and sympathy. Beyond that I don't quite know what to say - I am still processing the news. :(

Reuters article (http://today.reuters.com/business/newsarticle.aspx?type=tnBusinessNews&storyID=nL07181350&imageid=top-news-view-2005-07-07-143722-eRPPISA%5B26%5D.jpg&cap=A%20casualty%20is%20taken%20away%20on%20a%20st retcher%20at%20London%27s%20King%20Cross%20station .%20A%20casualty%20is%20taken%20away%20on%20a%20st retcher%20at%20London%27s%20King%20Cross%20station %20in%20London%20July%207,%202005.%20A%20series%20 of%20explosions%20ripped%20through%20London%27s%20 underground%20system%20on%20Thursday%20morning,%20 killing%20dozens%20of%20people,%20in%20what%20appe ared%20to%20be%20co-ordinated%20attacks%20to%20coincide%20with%20the%2 0start%20of%20a%20G8%20summit%20in%20Scotland.%20R EUTERS/David%20Parry)

Hugh Wyn Griffith
07-07-2005, 12:33 PM
Many thanks from a dual in Florida.

Thanks to email I had an "all OK" message back from my son who works in London.

Franca
07-07-2005, 01:02 PM
I'm so glad your son is safe. Hooray for e-mail. Long distance phone service can be interrupted for extended periods during any type of disaster - I know, having been through the Loma Prieta earthquake in 1989. There were plenty of unhappy long distance phone service customers. AT&T was out, but my Sprint service was going strong and I was able to let my east coast family know I was OK. I didn't have e-mail (or even a computer at my house) back then!

Robin Springall
07-07-2005, 01:13 PM
Thanks for your thoughts, darling xx

Hugh Wyn Griffith
07-07-2005, 02:59 PM
Glad to hear you are OK too.

<< I work in W10 duplicating CDs and DVDs. >>

Outside the Scrubs I hope <gdr>

ktinkel
07-07-2005, 04:18 PM
Glad to hear you are OK too.

<< I work in W10 duplicating CDs and DVDs. >>

Outside the Scrubs I hope <gdr>I am glad you’re all okay.

Although, from what we have learned from the aftermath of the World Trade Center bombings, the whole city of London will go through a sort of post-traumatic stress crisis over the next few months. (That is even though the response from the public was amazing!)

Mike
07-07-2005, 11:18 PM
Many thanks.

The main newscasts now seem to have settled into 'we new our turn would come and now it has'. A sort of fatalistic attitude that it had to happen but at least we've now got it over. Maybe that attitude will prove helpful if nothing else happens for a while.

I guess a lot of people will feel very nervous about using public transport for a while though. Unfortunately most of them don't have any choice as it's their only way of getting to work.

BigJohnD
07-30-2005, 06:22 AM
Yes, apart from the bizarre killing of Jean Charles de Menezes, our Police have been wonderful.
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/in_depth/uk/2005/london_explosions/default.stm

Use of the Underground and numbers of tourists have decreased though. Ironically, it could be good time to visit as it'll not be crowded, and possibly a bit cheaper. No, delete that last remark. London is never cheap.
http://www.guardian.co.uk/attackonlondon/story/0,16132,1539115,00.html

Meanwhile I'm off to France next week for almost three weeks. We're visiting Alsace, Épernay and Beaune. Any connection with the French wine industry is entirely coincidental…

ktinkel
07-30-2005, 09:19 AM
Meanwhile I'm off to France next week for almost three weeks. We're visiting Alsace, Épernay and Beaune. Any connection with the French wine industry is entirely coincidental…Oooh. Lucky you.

You probably know where you’re going in Alsace, assuming you just might be willing to give up some time to pursuit of wine, but just in case not:

We went to Alsace on our last trip to France, in part because we had never been to that part of the country, but mostly to visit a wine maker, Schatzel in Ammerschwihr near Colmar. His wines are excellent (a giant step up from Trimbach and the other “factory” Alsatian wines that we had known before). I can’t find his address, but it is near, within view, of the town’s major hotel, which has a very good restaurant.

Since coming home, we have found another small maker whose wines we like even more, Gerard Schueller (http://www.gauntley-wine.co.uk/latestoffers/1999_alsace.html#gerard_schueller) of Husseren-les-Châteaux. His gewurtz is slightly viscous, golden, and gloriously voluptuous. (Sorry — just thinking of them makes me overwrought! <g>.)

The rieslings are slightly more restrained, as appropriate, and very good; and we have yet to taste the Edelzwicker Bildstoeckle 2000 — we have a bottle of that one, so your mention of Alsace made me run out to set it to chill for this evening. (The link above is to an English wine site that mentions Schueller. The writer likes the wines as well as we do, evidently.)

In Beaune we generally visit wine shops, and have decent luck. Any advice? We usually stop there, going to or from Saint-Rémy-de-Provence.

I hope you have a wonderful, fruitful trip.

Franca
07-30-2005, 01:14 PM
Meanwhile I'm off to France next week for almost three weeks. We're visiting Alsace, Épernay and Beaune. Any connection with the French wine industry is entirely coincidental…Have a fabulous time!!! We had a blast there in June, even though only one of the three weeks was vacation.

Mike
07-31-2005, 12:51 AM
Meanwhile I'm off to France next week for almost three weeks. We're visiting Alsace, Épernay and Beaune. Any connection with the French wine industry is entirely coincidental…

Hope it's drier there than it is in Wales (weatherwise that is). Have a good time.

BigJohnD
08-01-2005, 12:33 PM
Hope it's drier there than it is in Wales
He he he! Personally I prefer cool and damp to hot and dry. It's not been too bad here on the east bank of the Afon Dyfrdwy ( http://cy.wikipedia.org/wiki/Afon_Dyfrdwy ) being sheltered by Snowdonia and the Clwydians. But then you must be near soggy Penycarreg, from where the English steal the world's best water!

Thanks for the link, Kathleen, to Gauntleys of Nottingham. They look like the DB's of vin d'Alsace. So much so I clould nip over there, buy a few cases of Grand Cru and Crémant and convince everyone they were personal imports! Think of the ££££s I could save.

I've been to Alsace a few times before, but never stayed longer enough to savour the local culture in depth. We're staying in Saint-Dié and then Kaysersberg. I've done some researching on the 'Net but as usual I end up reading Michelin's excellent "Guide Vert", this time of Alsace, Lorraine and Champagne - with full details of the 180Km La Route des Vins (*** - Highly recommneded!) from Marlenheim to Thann. Hopefully there'll be time for a tour of the Vosges Mountains too.

Earlier this year I went to one of Jones the Vine's winetastings at Cranage Hall in nearby Cheshire. I've never drink so much nor so many differing wines!! Get along to one if you can - http://www.wineontheweb.co.uk/ I was lucky - we got in for half price.

We're leaving for La France on Friday, but meanwhile we're having a spot of both set of wheels. The ECU warning light on SWMBO's Ford is permanently on and the dealer can't sort it despite a new Lambda sensor and coils. It's going in again tomorrow. A gearbox mounting on my trusty Fiat has decided to die, and the replacement won't be here from Italy til Thursday, when the repair will be done. So we're not sure which motor we're going in yet! I love a challenge.

We're crossing the water to France with SpeedFerries for about £65 return:
http://www.ferry-site.dk/picture/ferry/9161560j.jpg
It looks like something from James Bond's Die Another Day.
We had a blast there in June
Great! The Rhine Valley is along way from the Pacific - and very different. I did a flying pass of Monterey once while driving south from Seattle to deepest Disney in Long Beach.

And just to show we're till on thread - http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Charles_de_Menezes - is pretty good impartial summary, recognising the confusion and putting both sides of the case clearly.

ktinkel
08-01-2005, 03:52 PM
He he he! Personally I prefer cool and damp to hot and dry.Me, too. Though cool and breezy (not damp) trumps all!

Thanks for the link, Kathleen, to Gauntleys of Nottingham. They look like the DB's of vin d'Alsace. So much so I clould nip over there, buy a few cases of Grand Cru and Crémant and convince everyone they were personal imports! Think of the ££££s I could save.Yeah, but it wouldn’t be as much fun as cruising around Alsace. (But it sure does look like a good wine place.)

Earlier this year I went to one of Jones the Vine's winetastings at Cranage Hall in nearby Cheshire. I've never drink so much nor so many differing wines!! Get along to one if you can - http://www.wineontheweb.co.uk/ I was lucky - we got in for half price.I would like to try. Maybe someday.

Have a wonderful trip. Let me know if you find some wonderful wines! <g>

ktinkel
08-01-2005, 04:08 PM
A gearbox mounting on my trusty Fiat has decided to die, and the replacement won't be here from Italy til Thursday, when the repair will be done.What Fiat?

Have to ask. Jack and I used to have a small fleet of Fiat Stradas (American name, I’d bet) — that is, two of them — and loved the cars. I crashed mine; he drove his into the ground. But they were, as Jack put it, GTIs with soul.

Unfortunately, Fiat abandoned the U.S. when we wore out those cars, or we would probably be driving some Fiat or another today.

BigJohnD
08-01-2005, 11:25 PM
Hi, Kathleen,

The Fiat Strada was common place in the UK and Europe at one time, though IIRC was prone to rust. I have an early Punto, from 98, arguably the best model, the 16 valve 85ELX. It's just had its 3rd 36,000 mile service at 108,000 miles and is still good. One reason I still have it is the engine, which is just superb. It still spins right round the clock to the rev limiter at 6.5K and returns a fraction under 10miles/litre or about 45miles/UK gallon. Everything works as new, and apart from a few things wearing out (clutch, rear wheel bearings plus the usual of Michelin tyres, battery, wiper blades) it's never broken down.

http://bigjohnd.250free.com/pmwin/r688map.jpg

It's getting on now, and probably next to worthless, so I'm looking at its successor. It'll be a diesel for certain, a Citroën C4 (http://www.citroen.co.uk/c4/homepage.asp?pagetype=c4) or a Golf TDi (http://www.vw.co.uk/new_cars/new_golf_hatch) are the front runners. Diesels haven't caught on in the USA, but when the price of fuel bites, they will. Something like a third of new car sales are now diesels, and with big cars like BMW and Mercs, up to 60% of their sales are diesels. They are so good, it's almost impossible to tell which engine is in a car. I'll be looking for 50-60mpg as my daily average.

"In Europe, in fact, the increasing prevalence of diesel technology has the potential to make a dent in the output of global warming gases on its own, because the fuel efficiency of a diesel is on average 20% better than a petrol engine of similar performance, and fuel efficiency is directly related to CO2 output. Nearly half all the new cars sold in the EU now are diesels, and the UK is catching up rapidly. Last year a fifth of new UK cars were diesels and by the end of this year the proportion will be nearly a third.

But diesels have one major environmental problem: they emit more of the smog-causing nitrogen oxides and hydrocarbons than other cars. But from January next year (2005) that will have to change, with the introduction of a new EU law that will force the dirtier diesels to include particulate traps in the exhausts.

Despite this new technology the US and Japanese markets are set to remain resolutely anti-diesel, in part because in both countries smog is considered a significant environmental issue. There is a practical problem, too: the quality of diesel fuel in both countries lags behind that in Europe, meaning the latest generation of diesels aren't suitable and simply cannot be driven on the roads of the US and Japan."

http://www.guardian.co.uk/cars/story/0,15383,1357773,00.html
27th November 04