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annc
06-22-2005, 02:49 PM
Only two days after the shortest day of the year, we're having the coldest day of the year so far, and there's a brush wattlebird obviously building a nest somewhere nearby.

With the wisteria on the pergola outside my window sporting only a few brown-tipped leaflets from last spring, the wattlebird is happily plundering the nests built by the spotted turtle doves during the spring and summer. Goodness knows what precarious site the turtle doves, who breed year-round, have chosen this time.

Anyway, while that's interesting to watch, what is totally fascinating is the way the wattlebird is collecting spider's web to glue its nest together. Directly outside the window (actually attached to the window frame in one spot) is one of those loopy webs built by some sort of garden spider. It's one of those that look like holey. droopy circus safety nets.

The wattle bird perches on the carport gutter, then flies into the web, grabs a strand, and half-turns in mid-air, flying away sideways to drag a strand out without getting tangled up in the web itself.

Fascinating. I'm getting no work done.

djb
06-22-2005, 03:18 PM
One day after the longest day of the year, we're once again on a severe thuunderstorm watch. An incredible boomer rolled though about 1:30 am, with rain so hard visibility was under 20 meters. We're finally getting some heat after a cool and damp spring (which is good for keeping the grasshoppers under control -- not insignifcant in farm country) and the most amazing thing in the last few days in the number of butterflies! They're EVERYWHERE!
That and the fact that I'm sure I can hear my lawn growing...

annc
06-22-2005, 03:47 PM
One day after the longest day of the year, we're once again on a severe thuunderstorm watch. An incredible boomer rolled though about 1:30 am, with rain so hard visibility was under 20 meters. We're finally getting some heat after a cool and damp spring (which is good for keeping the grasshoppers under control -- not insignifcant in farm country) and the most amazing thing in the last few days in the number of butterflies! They're EVERYWHERE!
That and the fact that I'm sure I can hear my lawn growing...No hail, I hope. We had a severe hailstorm only about three weeks ago - almost unheard of here in winter, although we get them routinely in summer.

And so far, winter's been so warm here that my lawn is still growing. Grump. Maybe this cold snap will cause the soil temperature to drop far enough to give me a break.

It was 12 degrees Celsiuswhen i was driving home at 11 p.m. last night. Bloody freezing. ;-)

ktinkel
06-22-2005, 04:11 PM
Only two days after the shortest day of the year, we're having the coldest day of the year so far, and there's a brush wattlebird obviously building a nest somewhere nearby.What’s a wattlebird?

djb
06-22-2005, 04:25 PM
No hail, I hope. We had a severe hailstorm only about three weeks ago - almost unheard of here in winter, although we get them routinely in summer.

And so far, winter's been so warm here that my lawn is still growing. Grump. Maybe this cold snap will cause the soil temperature to drop far enough to give me a break.

It was 12 degrees Celsiuswhen i was driving home at 11 p.m. last night. Bloody freezing. ;-)

We had no hail here, but one of my staff about 5 kms northeast of us did. We had a tree down at work, have to take my chainsaw tomorrow... Alberta and Saskatchewan have been pounded by harsh weather in the last week or so. The river is currently flowing at about 1700 cubic meters per second, the highest in a long, long time. 10 years ago everyone was worried about 1280 cms. Tornadoes, plow winds, floods. After 5 years of drought, no less...

12C would be freezing here, too. In fact, tomorrow the forecast is for storms to roll through in the morning, and the temp to plummet to... 12C. It's 30C right now.

annc
06-22-2005, 05:00 PM
We had no hail here, but one of my staff about 5 kms northeast of us did. We had a tree down at work, have to take my chainsaw tomorrow... Alberta and Saskatchewan have been pounded by harsh weather in the last week or so. The river is currently flowing at about 1700 cubic meters per second, the highest in a long, long time. 10 years ago everyone was worried about 1280 cms. Tornadoes, plow winds, floods. After 5 years of drought, no less...

12C would be freezing here, too. In fact, tomorrow the forecast is for storms to roll through in the morning, and the temp to plummet to... 12C. It's 30C right now.There was a story in our local paper the other day about flooding in Calgary. I wasn't aware that that weather was affecting you as well.

djb
06-22-2005, 05:19 PM
There was a story in our local paper the other day about flooding in Calgary. I wasn't aware that that weather was affecting you as well.

We're about a 7 hour drive northeast from Calgary, and all the water from southern Alberta enters the South Saskatchewan River system. That's the river that flows through Toontown.

Weather in Canada tends to move west to east, and flows from Montana (south of Sask and Alberta ) in a northeasterly direction are common.

In gross terms, draw a line from California to Hudson's Bay across North America. Weather often moves along that line, and we're on it.

;-)

annc
06-22-2005, 05:20 PM
What’s a wattlebird?They're honeyeaters, some with a pendant wattle of skin on the ear.

The brush wattlebird doesn't have visible wattles, but is a very attractive bird. You can see a couple of photos (click to enlarge) on this page (http://photos.rnr.id.au/birds_wattlebird.html). The fact that they're honeyeaters helps to explain the clever flying antics of the bird this morning.

djb
06-22-2005, 05:21 PM
What’s a wattlebird?

<http://photos.rnr.id.au/birds/WattleBird.jpg>

"This 'ere's the wattle, the emblem of our land. You can stick in a bottle or 'old it in yer 'and. Amen!"

djb
06-22-2005, 05:23 PM
And so far, winter's been so warm here that my lawn is still growing. Grump. Maybe this cold snap will cause the soil temperature to drop far enough to give me a break.

I'm off on something of a Python jag today for some reason, so I'll say that here it's "hot enough to boil a monkey's bum."

annc
06-22-2005, 05:24 PM
In gross terms, draw a line from California to Hudson's Bay across North America. Weather often moves along that line, and we're on it.

;-)Well, I hope you get the northern Californian second-hand air, and not the LA smog! ;-)

Mike
06-22-2005, 11:52 PM
There was a story in our local paper the other day about flooding in Calgary.

The other day they forecasted severe weather and floods in mid Wales. In the event either the forecaster or the weather showed some ignorance of geography and the rain and floods occurred in Yorkshire (England) where they had something like 5 inches of rain in a couple of hours (almost unheard of in England) and a house or two was washed away. It was the main item on the BBC news for about a whole day till grunting women tennis players at Wimbledon took over.

annc
06-23-2005, 12:19 AM
The other day they forecasted severe weather and floods in mid Wales. In the event either the forecaster or the weather showed some ignorance of geography and the rain and floods occurred in Yorkshire (England) where they had something like 5 inches of rain in a couple of hours (almost unheard of in England) and a house or two was washed away. It was the main item on the BBC news for about a whole day till grunting women tennis players at Wimbledon took over.Just about everyone I know would kill for five inches of rain in a day here, because it would mean runoff into the dams. But we're geared for that sort of rain, as in better times we would get up to 12 inches in a day, a couple of times a year.

But I can imagine the devastation that must have caused in a country that isn't accustomed to it. Poor people!

60% of Queensland is currently drought-declared, and much of that percentage has been drought-declared for years.

Shane Stanley
06-23-2005, 03:31 AM
Just about everyone I know would kill for five inches of rain in a day here, because it would mean runoff into the dams. But we're geared for that sort of rain

We're not geared for it, but that doesn't mean most people wouldn't welcome it...

Shane

annc
06-23-2005, 01:03 PM
We're not geared for it, but that doesn't mean most people wouldn't welcome it...

ShaneI bet! Hope you get your winter rain this year.

If it's any help, we're starting to have a normal-feeling winter up here.

annc
06-23-2005, 01:04 PM
I'm off on something of a Python jag today for some reason, so I'll say that here it's "hot enough to boil a monkey's bum."And unusually humid, I gather.

ElyseC
06-23-2005, 01:08 PM
Gee, that's a lot more fascinating than my afternoon I'm spending (well, except for this little online break) sucking up spiders and webs with the central vacuum system while staying out of the 94F heat going on outside (which probably topped very near 100F a couple of hours ago).

Last night the three of us stood outside at dusk (about 9:30p) and watched the amazing firefly show in the tall grass of the 1.5+ acres of low lots across our little street. All the grass positively shimmered and twinkled like a silent miniature fireworks show. Even 5 year old Ben was impressed.

annc
06-23-2005, 01:26 PM
Gee, that's a lot more fascinating than my afternoon I'm spending (well, except for this little online break) sucking up spiders and webs with the central vacuum system while staying out of the 94F heat going on outside (which probably topped very near 100F a couple of hours ago).My vacuum cleaner can't reach high enough to get the spiders in here. I have to use a cobweb brush for that.

I thought you people were all screened.

Last night the three of us stood outside at dusk (about 9:30p) and watched the amazing firefly show in the tall grass of the 1.5+ acres of low lots across our little street. All the grass positively shimmered and twinkled like a silent miniature fireworks show. Even 5 year old Ben was impressed.I'd have expected the five year-old to be the most impressed.

djb
06-23-2005, 01:33 PM
And unusually humid, I gather.

Not surprising, what with all the water laying about. Mosquitos are strating to become a bit of an annoyance. Very few grasshoppers, though, one result of a cool and wet spring.

terrie
06-23-2005, 01:36 PM
Kind of looks like a mockingbird...the nest building sounds absolutely fascinating...are you getting any pictures?

Terrie

ktinkel
06-23-2005, 01:39 PM
The brush wattlebird doesn't have visible wattles, but is a very attractive bird.Very pretty bird. We don’t have any, or at least I’ve never seen one or heard about them.

annc
06-23-2005, 02:43 PM
Kind of looks like a mockingbird...the nest building sounds absolutely fascinating...are you getting any pictures?Nope. I grabbed the camera when I saw what it was doing, but the next time it came back, it just went to the old turtledove nests to steal twigs.

annc
06-23-2005, 02:45 PM
Very pretty bird. We don’t have any, or at least I’ve never seen one or heard about them.Yes, they're very attractive. I've got some shots somewhere of one of them having a very splashy bath in the middle of summer.

Shane Stanley
06-23-2005, 04:13 PM
Hope you get your winter rain this year.

We're getting _some_, but still less than normal. Lots of nervous farmers about.

Shane

annc
06-23-2005, 04:45 PM
Lots of nervous farmers about. I can imagine. Another winter without rain would put some of them in dire straits.

ElyseC
06-23-2005, 07:14 PM
My vacuum cleaner can't reach high enough to get the spiders in here. I have to use a cobweb brush for that.

I thought you people were all screened.Yes, but spiders find their way in anyway, no matter what. The babies are tiny little boogers who get inside unnoticed, then build homes and grow to a noticeable size.

I'd have expected the five year-old to be the most impressed.Kids this young usually don't give a hoot about scenery; on family trips, for example, they consider a view fascinating if it contains an amusement park or other kid-friendly attraction. <g> After a minute or two of the firefly show he tried changing the topic of conversation to his current passion, Star Wars, and "what if fireflies were really flying light-sabers" or some such "what if". <g>

Mervyn Long
06-23-2005, 07:35 PM
Ahem! You *are* being watched you know! <g>

Mervyn
Los Angeles

marlene
06-23-2005, 09:59 PM
We had a severe hailstorm only about three weeks ago - almost unheard of here in winter

Uh-oh. "The Last Wave" ...

mxh

annc
06-23-2005, 10:04 PM
Ahem! You *are* being watched you know! <g>

Mervyn
Los AngelesWell, hello stranger!

Don't worry, I don't blame you for the smog. <g>

annc
06-23-2005, 10:11 PM
Uh-oh. "The Last Wave" ...Could easily be. Our weather has been very strange lately. Although that hailstorm did strike at the usual time - going home from work time.

Mike
06-23-2005, 11:30 PM
I bet! Hope you get your winter rain this year.

If it's any help, we're starting to have a normal-feeling winter up here.

Two years ago we had a dry summer and ran out of water as our water supply is a spring. Last year it rained quite a bit but the ground didn't return to normal and much of the water ran off into the rivers rather than soaking into the ground.

This year this seem to have almost returned to normal but it's surprising how long the ground takes to recover from even a short drought.

Of course we're now plagued with midges. Last week we bought a midge-catching machine and so far it's caught about half a kilo of midges. There's still plenty of midges around but disposing of a bag full of dead midges every few days is very satisfying.

Mervyn Long
06-24-2005, 05:45 AM
Anne - Oh, I've been checking in every couple of days, lurking <g> . Need that fix

Mervyn

ktinkel
06-24-2005, 06:29 AM
Anne - Oh, I've been checking in every couple of days, lurking <g> . Need that fixThat’s what I was thinking, only turned around — we’ve been in need of a Mervyn fix! Nice to see you again. How’s the house now?

Mervyn Long
06-24-2005, 06:46 AM
>How’s the house now?

Hi, Kathleen! The usual thing of having done the kitchen, it's made a lot of other areas cry out for work. Trying to ignore the cries.

I was just thinking how sad it is that in SoCal lovely houses with all the charm and character that time and love brings are routinely demolished and replaced with sterile and ostentatious maxicubes. It will be the fate of our home, I'm sure when the time comes to sell it (may that be years away!). Sad!

Mervyn

ktinkel
06-24-2005, 08:18 AM
I was just thinking how sad it is that in SoCal lovely houses with all the charm and character that time and love brings are routinely demolished and replaced with sterile and ostentatious maxicubes.Not only in SoCal — all over New England as well. The new houses are not only vulgarly huge but vulgarly made, of cheap materials and trite visual references (some look as if someone browsed through a history of architecture and chose bits and pieces at random, then faked them as cheaply as possible).

These “McMansions” make once-distinctive towns look all alike, and bland at that. And if I never again see a palladian window with fake lights it will be too soon for me!

As you see, you have lit on a sore point! <g>

marlene
06-24-2005, 09:30 AM
Well, let us know when it starts raining frogs.

mxh

annc
06-24-2005, 11:41 AM
>How’s the house now?

Hi, Kathleen! The usual thing of having done the kitchen, it's made a lot of other areas cry out for work. Trying to ignore the cries.

I was just thinking how sad it is that in SoCal lovely houses with all the charm and character that time and love brings are routinely demolished and replaced with sterile and ostentatious maxicubes. It will be the fate of our home, I'm sure when the time comes to sell it (may that be years away!). Sad!It's all fake Tuscan here at the moment, being built on tiny blocks that they fill, so that people are staring into their neighbours' bedrooms (except where the rooms face west, where they have to keep the blinds drawn all the time because they have no eaves). Acres and acres of them, but people buy them!

Because the older houses were of timber, built high on stumps to catch the breezes, instead of demolishing them, they are cut in half and moved to the fashionable five acre blocks surrounding most towns, where they are joined back together again. We even have a used house lot on the highway just south of here.

The older suburbs of Brisbane are now protected from having the houses removed to other locations, but they are allowing people to move the old Queenslanders to one side of the large blocks, so that the fake Tuscan monstrosities can be built on the other half. With Palladian windows, of course.

annc
06-24-2005, 11:43 AM
Anne - Oh, I've been checking in every couple of days, lurking <g> . Need that fixWell, I'm glad you came out of the cupboard you were lurking in, Mervyn. We need you here and posting. ;-)

ElyseC
06-24-2005, 01:12 PM
I was just thinking how sad it is that in SoCal lovely houses with all the charm and character that time and love brings are routinely demolished and replaced with sterile and ostentatious maxicubes. It will be the fate of our home, I'm sure when the time comes to sell it (may that be years away!). Sad!And here in Iowa the structure is more valuable than the land, so sometimes people buy a house they like on land they don't, buy land they do like, then pick up and move the house to the desired spot. Then again, it's quite affordable to build, so most just find the land, then design and build exactly what they want where they want.

Oh, and in the rural areas you don't have to be bothered with lots of red tape -- the only permit you need to pull for building in an unincorporated area is the one for your septic system. That's it.

"Is this Heaven?" "No, it's Iowa."

:-)

Michael Rowley
06-24-2005, 03:02 PM
Ann:

With Palladian windows

What are 'Palladian' windows? I went to school at Prior Park, Ralph Allen's Palladian house outside Bath (it's built in Bath stone, then a new building material—Allen owned a quarry behind his house, which is prominently visible from the town; advertisement was known in the 18th century too!), but I didn't notice that the windows were peculiar—just run of the mill for the period.

ktinkel
06-24-2005, 03:32 PM
What are 'Palladian' windows? … I didn't notice that the windows were peculiar—just run of the mill for the period.They are arch-topped windows and very popular in today’s pseudo-architecture.

To add insult to injury, they are often made with a frame and a single sheet of glass, and then with a sort of grille overlaid to make it look as if there were several panes of glass.

Revolting. You in England are probably saved from such foolishness (unless, of course, “Keeping Up Appearances” is reality. This is the sort of stuff that Hyacinth would definitely approve of!)

Mervyn Long
06-24-2005, 04:23 PM
Well, I'm glad you came out of the cupboard you were lurking in, Mervyn. We need you here and posting. ;-)
Me? In the closet? Just what do you mean by that? <g>

Talking about homes, houses, living area, we've discovered the upside of having the guv as a neighbour - the canyon road, a simple two-lane, hasn't been repaired in any meaningful way for the last 30 years we've lived here, but after the last rains did some damage (nothing more than usual potholes) the city crews arrived, ground the road down to its bed level and replaced the whole road surface in just a weekend. Mustn't jolt the guv's Hummers. must we? <g>

Mervyn

Franca
06-24-2005, 04:47 PM
Mustn't jolt the guv's Hummers. must we? <g>Sheesh. Well, whatever the reason for it, I guess a new road is a Good Thing.

(I don't know why anyone would want even a single Hummer, much less plural ones....)

Susie
06-24-2005, 05:42 PM
What is a midge?

Susie

Susie
06-24-2005, 05:47 PM
Here it Texas it seems as if more and more developers are taking lots approximately the size of one house lot, then putting three or four McMansions on them. The houses are so close, not only can you see into your neighbor's bedroom, you can literally reach out and touch it. It's really disturbing. Not only that, we are losing all the trees in order to build these monstrosities.

Susie

Mike
06-25-2005, 12:47 AM
What is a midge?

Susie

A small fly that breeds in its millions and bites. Take a look at:

http://www.scotweb.co.uk/environment/midges/whatisamidge.html

Richard Hunt
06-25-2005, 05:36 AM
You in England are probably saved from such foolishness (unless, of course, “Keeping Up Appearances” is reality. This is the sort of stuff that Hyacinth would definitely approve of!)

Yes and no. Most of the replacement window firms offer double-glazed uPVC window units with pseudo-lead strips to imitate proper leaded lights. I doubt Hyacinth would approve - but her slob brother would.

Richard

Mervyn Long
06-25-2005, 06:21 AM
Sheesh. Well, whatever the reason for it, I guess a new road is a Good Thing.

(I don't know why anyone would want even a single Hummer, much less plural ones....)
Franca - gotta confess I cringe at the thought of even being *seen* in one. Kathleen used a good term for the maxicube building style - 'vulgar' - and I think that sums up the Hummer pretty well, too. When I try to imagine the reasons for anyone to buy one I can only come up with personal insecurity. But then, I drive my wife's Subaru most of the time <g>

Mervyn

Michael Rowley
06-25-2005, 08:18 AM
KT:

They are arch-topped windows and very popular in today’s pseudo-architecture

I've never associated round-topped windows with Palladio, but possibly that's just my ignorance. Most English Palladian-style buildings (there aren't very many) have rectangular windows. Of course, 'Georgian' houses are very popular in England, which doesn't go in much for modern domestic architecture, and it's no surprise to me that America and Australia haven't much better taste.

In defence of people living in houses of doubtful taste, I should say that the occupants of a house don't see their it from the outside, so the interior matters most to them. And in that respect, I imagine that American houses are better planned than English ones.

Susie
06-26-2005, 04:21 PM
A small fly that breeds in its millions and bites. Take a look at:

http://www.scotweb.co.uk/environment/midges/whatisamidge.html

Sort of like a gnat?

Susie

annc
06-27-2005, 01:26 AM
Two years ago we had a dry summer and ran out of water as our water supply is a spring. Last year it rained quite a bit but the ground didn't return to normal and much of the water ran off into the rivers rather than soaking into the ground.

This year this seem to have almost returned to normal but it's surprising how long the ground takes to recover from even a short drought.

Of course we're now plagued with midges. Last week we bought a midge-catching machine and so far it's caught about half a kilo of midges. There's still plenty of midges around but disposing of a bag full of dead midges every few days is very satisfying.Half your luck, having a short drought. The dams here are way down below 40% full.

Don't you hate midges? We call them sandflies here, and they come through the insect screens. Not that that makes any difference to me, not having screens. I'm semi-allergic to their bites, so have to be a bit careful not to come up in weals that are about six inches across.

Mike
06-28-2005, 07:24 AM
Yes and no. Most of the replacement window firms offer double-glazed uPVC window units

Fortunately we still have some craftsmen around. At this very moment a local craftsman is fitting proper wooden cottage-style windows to our house to replace the ones that his wife's uncle fitted in the 1970s when picture windows were considered trendy.

I just hope the paint dries sufficiently before we go to bed as they've forecast severe thunder storms for tonight.

Molly/CA
06-28-2005, 04:38 PM
The interiors of the chipboard chalets I've been in are horrible --to my taste. Big slabs of tile in the --I suppose it's called an "atrium" --place where you come in, big open spaces for no purpose whatever, dinky kitchens, no good place for books. But then, here, most people probably never see half the insides of their houses as most of the year they leave for their commute in the dark and come home in the dark. If they eat it must be TV dinners. I have a suspicion it's out of the car (inside garage) to TV room to bed.

Molly/CA
06-28-2005, 04:44 PM
Those gnasty gnats that chew the horses raw are, so far as I can figure, "midges" in British-speaking countries. The ones we have are called Buffalo Gnats because of sort of a hump on their backs. Before I found out about homeopathic sting-stop I used to get blisters from riding into a cloud of them. Ugly little #$%^& and so's.

Mervyn Long
06-28-2005, 05:00 PM
The interiors of the chipboard chalets I've been in are horrible --to my taste. Big slabs of tile in the --I suppose it's called an "atrium" --place where you come in, big open spaces for no purpose whatever, dinky kitchens, no good place for books. But then, here, most people probably never see half the insides of their houses as most of the year they leave for their commute in the dark and come home in the dark. If they eat it must be TV dinners. I have a suspicion it's out of the car (inside garage) to TV room to bed.
I suppose it's an outgrowth of developments in the past where streets of identical, modest house were built on modest lots for sale at modest prices. What's changed is that the lots are even more modest, the buildings are far from modest and the prices are astronomical. With only feet between one house and the next, no gardens and communal social facilities, they are more people storage places than homes.

I hope I am never called upon to live in a house where I must check the number on the mailbox to make sure it's the one I live in.

Mervyn

ktinkel
06-28-2005, 05:14 PM
I hope I am never called upon to live in a house where I must check the number on the mailbox to make sure it's the one I live in.
Me, too. One of the things I like about where we live now is the variety of houses. In Westport (Beverly Hills East!), the efforts of realtors to make houses easier to sell than to live in is to homogenize a once-interesting town and make it uniform.

It hasn’t happened here (yet), and I really like it.

Unfortunately, the handwriting is on the wall. A once-modest house like ours — because it is on the water — probably has a higher value than we would pay. And I see many perfectly nice places here being torn down and replaced with huge but tacky castles.

Pity. (Why didn’t we ever listen to Malthus?)

Anne Wright
06-28-2005, 08:22 PM
I hope I am never called upon to live in a house where I must check the number on the mailbox to make sure it's the one I live in.
Mervyn, When I was a kid we had a book about a boy (if I remember correctly) named Henry. Henry lived in a subdivision in which all the houses were identical - except the original Victorian style monstrosity. All the houses had been built from pre-fabricated kits to save time and money.

Everyone could find their house by its relationship to the Victorian house in the middle of the subdivision. But the woman who lived in that house was jealous of how easy the prefab houses were to care for and how cheap they were to heat. So as a surprise during a town wide celebration, she had her house torn down and a prefab put up in its place.

No one could find their own house after that.... When the song about the "ticky tacky houses all in a row became popular in the 1960s, I always thought about that story.

(I think this is the same book in which Henry's dog tangled with a skunk and they had to wash him with tomato juice. And due to the dog getting into the delivery truck, the delivery service was forever after known as "Untied Parcels").

Anne

Mervyn Long
06-29-2005, 08:03 AM
>And I see many perfectly nice places here being torn down and replaced with huge but tacky castles.<

It's said of Brentwood (where I live) that it's absolute proof that it's never a bad time to remodel. In CA we have a property tax control measure, know as Prop 13, which limits the amount of annual property tax increase a homeowner is liable for during the live-in ownership of a property. This came about during a time of soaring property values when it was not uncommon for people to have to leave their homes due to soaring property tax burdens. Now when you buy a property, the tax rate is linked to the price you pay for the house and only goes up by a small percentage each year. You pay the piper when you sell, through capital gains of course.

In the meantime when a property owner wants to build a new house on the land s/he owns, the trick is to leave enough of the original house standing so that it won't be revalued as a new property, but merely 'improvements' on the old. Some people are flying *very* close to the line by leaving a single wall standing from the original and it's going to be interesting to see what happens when they inevitably get contested.

Mervyn

Mervyn Long
06-29-2005, 08:06 AM
<g>

Mervyn

ElyseC
06-29-2005, 02:15 PM
You pay the piper when you sell, through capital gains of course.Unless you've lived in that house more than five years. We were in our CA house 19.5 years, so when we sold last September we had no capital gains issue.