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Robin Springall
02-28-2010, 06:47 AM
Is there a way to protect a Word document from being edited? I can set a password for opening the thing, but I'm looking for a something that gives unrestricted opening but no editing. So far, the only way I've found is to convert it to a PDF.

It's not for me, as I stay well away from Word, but the Boss would like her charity reports to be protected.

Steve Rindsberg
02-28-2010, 07:43 AM
None of this applies to Mac versions, but depending on the Windows version you have, you can set various restrictions. In Word 2003, choose File, Save As and then click Tools, Security to see the options. You can set the document so that it needs a password to modify it but that allows it to be opened for viewing only w/o password.

The password protection isn't terribly secure and I'm pretty sure it can be easily bypassed by anyone with Word 2007 and a bit of techno-savvy.

So back to you and da Boss: HOW secure must these things be and what's wrong with PDF anyhow? ;-)

Michael Rowley
02-28-2010, 08:47 AM
Robin:
Is there a way to protect a Word document from being edited?Making a particular document read-only prevents it from being edited, but unfortunately does not prevent it from being copied and saved with a different name. Making the document PDF is safest, and one doesn't have to have Acrobat for that.

Michael Beloved
02-28-2010, 01:03 PM
If you have Word 2007, you could click in Prepare after clicking the Start Button. There are two options as Restrict Permission and Mark as Final.

Mark as Final makes the document a read only file.

Robin Springall
02-28-2010, 03:00 PM
Mark as Final makes the document a read only file.Thanks, Michael. I reckon that's the best option for her because she just wants to prevent people from inadvertently making changes.

Michael Beloved
02-28-2010, 03:09 PM
One other thing is that if you make a file read only. You can convert it back to an editable document by doing a Save As and selecting .doc or .docx.

One related issue I used to have with Word .docx files was conversion to Adobe PDF. Sometimes images used to jump to different positions or pages, and sometimes text would jump. If you are doing a large file for a book, say, that is no fun, because you have to go through the entire printed proof and search for these errors.

By accidentally I found a solution, which is to download the free PDF maker add-on from Microsoft Downloads Website. Since I have used that I never had any image or anything jump or move.

There is one thing with that, which is that Word cannot open those PDFs. It can make them but cannot open them. They open with Adobe Reader or Adobe Acrobat or any bother generic PDF reader.

I am mentioning this because I endured months and sleepless night with large book files trying to upload them on Print On Demand equipment. Eventually I discovered these solutions. If I can save someone else the headache, that would be great.

Steve Rindsberg
02-28-2010, 03:09 PM
If you have Word 2007, you could click in Prepare after clicking the Start Button. There are two options as Restrict Permission and Mark as Final.

Mark as Final makes the document a read only file.
Not really. All the user has to do is repeat the same process to toggle Mark as Final back off, then edit away.

Michael Rowley
02-28-2010, 04:23 PM
Michael B.:
Accidentally I found a solution, which is to download the free PDF maker add-on from Microsoft Downloads WebsiteDo you mean the additional 'Save as PDF' file, the file that Adobe insisted on instead of Microsoft's incorporating it in the Word 2007 program? I ask, because Adobe also supplies PDF makers with Acrobat, which also work well.

Michael Beloved
02-28-2010, 04:30 PM
No, it is a Microsoft product, the Adobe add on is something else.

Here is a link to it:

http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyID=4d951911-3e7e-4ae6-b059-a2e79ed87041&displaylang=en

Robin Springall
03-01-2010, 05:53 AM
Thank you Michael. Have to say I'm not dead keen on docx or xlsx either.

Michael Rowley
03-01-2010, 08:59 AM
Michael:
'2007 Microsoft Office Add-in: Microsoft Save as PDF'That's the one I asked you about. It does not seem necessary for Word 2010, which is the only version I've used it in (because the Adobe add-in for Word 2007 doesn't work in Word 2010).

Michael Beloved
03-01-2010, 09:36 AM
Michael R.

So how do you pdf with Word 2010?

The main problem with pdfs is images mixed in with text, like illustrations scattered in a book, especially if there are labels added or markers.

When they are pdf across programs like from Word to Adobe, sometimes the images keep jumping. At least that was my experience.

Question is does Word 2010 have a built-in pdf?

Seems that in some instances, these companies are like Democrats Versus Republicans in Congress.

Michael Rowley
03-01-2010, 11:11 AM
Michael:
So how do you pdf with Word 2010?Word 2010 beta has 'Save as PDF built in (but so had Word 2007 beta, I think). But using it has a snag if any font in the Word doc or docx is not a TrueType font: some TTF is subsituted in the PDF; if the PDF is made by the Adobe add-in, you get a true reproduction of the Word document.

PDF is an ISO standard, but if an Acrobat copyright is infringed, Adobe will demand its pound of flesh.

In going from Word formatting to PDF formatting you may occasionally get reflow, and then images may appear where they should not. There was once a tip from Adobe that if you made the PDF while Adobe PDF was your default printer, reflow didn't occur. I have always kept to this, only changing the printer at the last minute; I don't get reflow, but whether or not it's just superstition is something I can't say.

Steve Rindsberg
03-01-2010, 12:17 PM
Michael,

If you've applied SP2 for Office 2007, the Save As XPS/PDF add-in was installed along with the service pack. Pre-SP2, you'd have needed to download and install the add-in Michael's mentioned.

Michael Beloved
03-01-2010, 12:44 PM
In Word 2007, Pdf also shows up if you install Adobe Acrobat in your computer. It would automatically fuse into Word and into similar applications as per their behind-the-scenes arrangements.
And you will know since Adobe will be tagged with their name or icon.

If you look at the image below you will also see a second listing of pdf. That is the one which is from Microsoft itself. That is their add-in.
I would be interested to know if the icon in 2010 Word is Adobe.
Because if it is, then it may mean that it is there because you have Acrobat in your computer, unless Microsoft signed another agreement to use Adobe Pdf as standard fare.

Here is the image:




http://meditationtime.googlegroups.com/web/trash-pdf.PNG?gsc=dBUbjAsAAAA6Gwdi75cpSVE21SJcposy

Michael Beloved
03-01-2010, 12:54 PM
And this page shows that 2010 has Microsoft's pdf system:


http://www.tech-recipes.com/rx/5036/office-2010-create-pdf-documents-from-word-excel-and-powerpoint/

Michael Beloved
03-01-2010, 12:57 PM
If the image was missing, please use this:

http://meditationtime.googlegroups.com/web/trash-pdf.PNG?gsc=hCJ8DgsAAAA15TjR1jtWkVKo8HgdbOpE

Michael Rowley
03-01-2010, 03:52 PM
Steve:
If you've applied SP2 for Office 2007, the Save As XPS/PDF add-in was installed along with the service pack. Pre-SP2, you'd have needed to download and install the add-in Michael's mentionedI wasn't conscious of any change brought about by SP2, for I was an early adopter of Word 2007 (but not Office 2007) and got the Microsoft add-in right away. But as I was already using the Adobe add-in (and still do use it), I didn't need the Word 'Save as . . .' (and haven't felt the urge to save as XPS).

I haven't tried the Office 2010 beta yet, but I tried (and liked) the version I did try, for which Adobe had not yet produced an add-in that worked.

Steve Rindsberg
03-01-2010, 06:47 PM
Steve:
I wasn't conscious of any change brought about by SP2, for I was an early adopter of Word 2007 (but not Office 2007) and got the Microsoft add-in right away. But as I was already using the Adobe add-in (and still do use it), I didn't need the Word 'Save as . . .' (and haven't felt the urge to save as XPS).

I haven't tried the Office 2010 beta yet, but I tried (and liked) the version I did try, for which Adobe had not yet produced an add-in that worked.
Michael:

If you'd already installed the MS add-in, you wouldn't have noticed any changes in that department as the result of installing SP2.

However you got it, it's worth giving it a try if you haven't already. It doesn't offer nearly the amount of control/features that Adobe's add-in + AdobePDF driver + Distiller do, but (at least on the documents I've worked with) it's far faster than Adobe's.

As PDF seems to be quite alive, well and kicking strongly I haven't thus far felt the pull of XPS (MS' ahem "PDF Killer" format) either.

Benwiggy
03-02-2010, 02:02 AM
Far from 'forcing PDF on MS', Adobe was originally quite reluctant to licence PDF to MS, because of its history of Embrace, Extend, Extinguish.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend_and_extinguish
However, if you bought Acrobat, part of the software was a PDFMaker plug-in for Office.

But since PDF has become a completely open standard, MS can implement it themselves.

Getting back on topic, both 'protected' Office and PDF documents can have their security undone fairly easily. Once you send a document to someone else, essentially, they can do what they like with it.

Cristen Gillespie
03-02-2010, 06:47 AM
Benwiggy: Getting back on topic, both 'protected' Office and PDF documents can have their security undone fairly easily. Once you send a document to someone else, essentially, they can do what they like with it.

Are you talking about hacks to get around the security? Because I receive protected PDFs all the time, and without the password, I can't do anything I like with it. If it has a watermark, I can't just go to Watermark and say remove it. If it says no printing, I can't just print because I have Acrobat Pro. And if it says can't open without a password, I can't do that either. Not in the the normal way of working with Acrobat Pro.

I know it's not unbreakable security, but it seems able to stop people who don't know anything about breaking security, so users on no ill intent, like Robin's sweetheart is concerned about, won't be able to change anything accidentally.

Benwiggy
03-02-2010, 08:30 AM
Obviously, Acrobat doesn't have tools to remove PDF security.

However, some third-party PDF readers or utilities either ignore the password requirement and any controls on printing or copying; or allow its removal. (Indeed, until recently, Apple's own ColorSync Utility, which was bundled with OS X, would accidentally remove security whenever it re-saved PDFs.)

As ever, a quick Google will reveal several tools to help you with "that password which you forgot".

Watermarks are much better for "security" than passwords. If it's only a few pages, then you can remove the wm on each page in Illustrator, but for a lengthy document, if you can't automate this, you're in for a long night.

You're right though that most document security provides 'casual' security so that people know the limits of what they're supposed to do. (In the same way as a cardboard front door.;) )

Michael Rowley
03-02-2010, 09:08 AM
Steve:
If you'd already installed the MS add-in, you wouldn't have noticed any changes in that department as the result of installing SP2Exactly: that was my point. But I accept all Microsoft's updates, patches, etc., assuming that their intention is benign, although accepting that the path to hell is paved with good intentions.

However you got it, it's worth giving it a try if you haven't already. It doesn't offer nearly the amount of control/features that Adobe's add-in + AdobePDF driver + Distiller do, but (at least on the documents I've worked with) it's far faster than Adobe's.I have tried it, and confirmed that it is faster than Adobe's add-ins (though it should be said that they have got much faster; I think the first was with Acrobat 6, but the version with Acrobat 9 is much more sophisticated). But the real challenge is with OTF fonts, which can't be embedded in anything Microsoft is involved in; Adobe's add-in doesn't turn a hair at OTF (naturally), so I can use the fonts I choose, which are not necessarily the fonts approved of by Microsoft.

Steve Rindsberg
03-02-2010, 10:26 AM
Far from 'forcing PDF on MS', Adobe was originally quite reluctant to licence PDF to MS, because of its history of Embrace, Extend, Extinguish.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Embrace,_extend_and_extinguish
However, if you bought Acrobat, part of the software was a PDFMaker plug-in for Office.

But since PDF has become a completely open standard, MS can implement it themselves.

Getting back on topic, both 'protected' Office and PDF documents can have their security undone fairly easily. Once you send a document to someone else, essentially, they can do what they like with it.
Re Adobe's reluctance: In fact, the original plan was to release Office 2007 with the ability to make PDFs built-in. MS removed it and made it an optional download only because Adobe objected (and IIRC, threatened lawsuit over it).

Why they later folded the add-in back into SP2, I don't know.

Steve Rindsberg
03-02-2010, 10:28 AM
Steve:
Exactly: that was my point. But I accept all Microsoft's updates, patches, etc., assuming that their intention is benign, although accepting that the path to hell is paved with good intentions.

I have tried it, and confirmed that it is faster than Adobe's add-ins (though it should be said that they have got much faster; I think the first was with Acrobat 6, but the version with Acrobat 9 is much more sophisticated). But the real challenge is with OTF fonts, which can't be embedded in anything Microsoft is involved in; Adobe's add-in doesn't turn a hair at OTF (naturally), so I can use the fonts I choose, which are not necessarily the fonts approved of by Microsoft.
Michael:

I didn't know of the limitation re embedding OTFs. It's a good thing to know. Thanks.

sky4forums
03-02-2010, 01:53 PM
I see no image in either of your messages.

Benwiggy
03-02-2010, 01:55 PM
But the real challenge is with OTF fonts, which can't be embedded in anything Microsoft is involved in.
:confused:
Opentype is a registered trademark of Microsoft! Why would MS not support OTF fonts?

Michael Beloved
03-02-2010, 02:00 PM
If this is the image you are looking for sky4, here it is:

shows the pdf add-ins for Adobe and for Microsoft in Word 2007





http://meditationtime.googlegroups.com/web/trash-pdf.PNG?gda=T-6T4kAAAAAw5Ok-qlgd2jGMQb4cMnRVXuu6pl0Wq0JeZh0a-HE_Fs7dZYPxkRLOPbwEa4xh9XdtxVPdW1gYotyj7-X7wDON&gsc=9BeoJwsAAADONczmf9j7ainzWyHBZJci

Michael Rowley
03-02-2010, 04:29 PM
Ben:
Opentype is a registered trademark of Microsoft! Why would MS not support OTF fonts?There's OpenType with TrueType profiles and there's OpenType with CFF, and both recent Windows and recent Mac OS (recent: since 2000) support either, but for some reason if a font file contains a CFF table, Word will not embed it. All OTF files contain a CFF table in practice. I don't know if Type 1 files are easily distinguished from OTF files, although OTF files contain embedding information and Type 1 files don't.

Cristen Gillespie
03-03-2010, 06:37 AM
Benwiggy: You're right though that most document security provides 'casual' security so that people know the limits of what they're supposed to do. (In the same way as a cardboard front door.;) )

Yes, not good enough for government work, but primarily aimed at those who aren't intent on doing anything with the PDF they oughtn't. A lot of people still seem to think everything on the web is free for them to use as they want, or they're the type that can't leave a library book alone and must copyedit and comment on it for everyone else's benefit, and a few obstacles sometimes clears up that notion for them.

Obviously, those who insist that everything out there is free for them to do with as they wish will be familiar with all the hack and crack sites.

dthomsen8
12-08-2010, 07:06 AM
One other thing is that if you make a file read only. You can convert it back to an editable document by doing a Save As and selecting .doc or .docx.



Thank you, just what I wanted to know, and could not find in the Word Help files.