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View Full Version : Avant Garde Rookie Card is out


donmcc
05-10-2005, 06:41 PM
I don't know how many trading card collectors there are in the forum, but I wanted to make sure everyone is aware of the Fonts.com series of trading cards based on common fonts. You can get PDFs of each (they are well over a dozen now) at http://www.fonts.com/AboutFonts/Articles/TypeTradingCards/index.htm.

(Avant Garde is among this month's releases, to explain the thread title.)

Don McCahill

ktinkel
05-11-2005, 06:17 AM
I don't know how many trading card collectors there are in the forum, but I wanted to make sure everyone is aware of the Fonts.com series of trading cards based on common fonts. You can get PDFs of each (they are well over a dozen now) …It is always great to get good information in an amusing package! Thanks.

Michael Rowley
06-09-2005, 06:46 AM
Don:

I protest at your condescending term 'rookie card'. A rookie is in England a raw recruit in the army etc., and I suggest that the word is seldom used these there days; in North America, I understand a rookie is used similarly with reference to sport. But the cards are valuable for the information they give about the distinctive features of typefaces, and although you and many others can, no doubt, recite them at the drop of a hat, there are many others that are less knowledgeable without being 'rookies'.

I myself confess to being a raw recruit.

don Arnoldy
06-09-2005, 09:18 AM
there are many others that are less knowledgeable without being 'rookies'.In this case, "rookie card" does stem from sports--or more specifically sports card trading. It refers to the card issued in the first year of a player's professional career. It is a "card about a rookie" not a "card for rookies".

Not sure that Avant Garde still qualifies as a rookie--but the intent of the referrence was "the first card issued on the subject."

--the other don

Michael Rowley
06-09-2005, 10:51 AM
Don:

It refers to the card issued in the first year of a player's professional career

And that explanation is just puzzling! But I must say the official name ('type trading cards') is not self-explanatory either, but possibly they're kind of cigarette card for grown-ups. Anyway, they're useful.

Perhaps someone will write a short account of North American mores for non-Americans that join the forum. (And in exchange, Ann or one of her colleagues from down under will write an account of the rules of cricket.)

donmcc
06-12-2005, 04:52 AM
To expand on what Don A. said: A rookie card is actually the most valuable of all cards, in most cases. It is the first card issued for a baseball player, and generally a rookie (the term in NA means first year player) is not well known. Thus the run for the card will be less than for a star.

If the rookie turns out to be a big star, then his rookie card will be worth much more than the cards issued when he is at the peak of his career, because by that time, many more cards are available.

For instance, a Mickey Mantle rookie card (I think it is the most prized of the bubble-gum trading cards) is worth many times more than the ones from later in his career.

The term was not intended to be condescending in any way. I apologize if it seemed to be.

Don McCahill

don Arnoldy
06-12-2005, 07:48 AM
possibly they're kind of cigarette card for grown-ups.Close... the very common cards with baseball players (and much after my childhood, players from other sports) were sold in chewing gum packages.