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View Full Version : How to Include Web Design in Physical Portfolio


Ronald
11-18-2009, 04:59 PM
I'm getting ready to print a couple things to add to my physical printed portfolio, but I'm not sure how to present a web design. Should I PDF the full layout as it was made in Illustrator (with text/photos included in the body of course), or should I go as far as printing with a browser window and taskbar to give its true appearance on a computer screen? The latter would obviously prevent one from seeing the entire page layout but be an arguably 'truer' appearance. Of course I'll convert to CMYK before printing; I think the RGB colors were based on the same solid to process swatches used to print the visitors guide.

I intend on printing at least two layouts, the intro page design and the actual homepage design used throughout the site. I'm not sure it would be worth printing any others, but I suppose they could further demonstrate how body copy & photo collages are used in the page layout.

By the way, I did a few Google searches on this topic before posting on here, but sure enough, all the links focused on web portfolios, not physical ones.

donmcc
11-19-2009, 06:57 AM
I would go with a true print of the site, possibly even the prototype from Illustrator or Photoshop (if the resolution is enough). You don't want something printing at screen resolution of 72 or 96 ppi, even though that is the web standard.

If the prototype was changed dramatically in the development process, so that it no longer matches the reality of the site, I would make enough screen captures to get the entire image, and then stitch them together in Photoshop. Print out the page at a reduced size so that it is at least 150 ppi (perhaps both pages will fit on one sheet of paper).

Steve Rindsberg
11-19-2009, 09:14 AM
1) I'd include the url so that anyone who's interested can view the real thing

2) If you're on PC, at least some screen capture apps (SnagIt by TechSmith is one) can do a "scrolling capture", which allows you to grab an image of the entire web page, not just the visible portion.

3) Test before converting to CMYK if you're printing to a desktop printer rather than a printing press. While inkjets and the like may print in CMYK, their device drivers usually present themselves to Windows as RGB devices (Mac too? Not sure). If you've already converted to CMYK, the app will have to convert back to RGB again, then the printer will convert that back to CMYK. You might get equally good results by printing from the RGB version in the first place. Or not. But it's easy to test. ;-)

Ronald
11-25-2009, 05:34 PM
Test before converting to CMYK if you're printing to a desktop printer rather than a printing press. While inkjets and the like may print in CMYK, their device drivers usually present themselves to Windows as RGB devices (Mac too? Not sure). If you've already converted to CMYK, the app will have to convert back to RGB again, then the printer will convert that back to CMYK. You might get equally good results by printing from the RGB version in the first place. Or not. But it's easy to test. ;-)I intended on printing any portfolio items at the local printshop, with the idea that their printer would produce a higher quality than my desktop printer. Maybe I should just try my desktop printer first.

And yes, I do intend on including the URL.

Thanks a lot for the advice, guys.