PDA

View Full Version : Critique My Cover Designs


Ronald
03-16-2009, 09:15 PM
I've designed a visitors guide and am working on a fold-out map. I'm happy with the guide cover but am not sure how to approach the map. I was thinking both should share some elements to tie together (the old versions do this also). I had a slight variation of the guide cover for the map, but then I made a totally new one. I like this new idea, but it doesn't feel complete as-is. Left-hand is the visitors guide; right-hand is the map.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v402/batmanytb/guidecover.jpg http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v402/batmanytb/mapcover.jpg


In case they don't show:
Guide Cover (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v402/batmanytb/guidecover.jpg)
Map Cover (http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v402/batmanytb/mapcover.jpg)

Maps of Manchester, Delaware County, and the Lake Delhi Area are all included on the fold-out map sheet, hence their typographic inclusion. I like the personality this offers. My biggest frustration is that the aerial photo is used the same way in both covers, but it's very practical for both. The map cover is also less intricate and full compared to the guide. It feels somewhat incomplete.

LoisWakeman
03-17-2009, 02:50 AM
Hi Ronald - I think you have put your finger on some of the things I thought too - though not sure I have any very useful suggestions. The guide looks as I would conventionally expect one to be (worthy but not very exciting) - but the map cover - though a fine example of typography as design, is a bit 'unformed' somehow - and to someone like me who doesn't know the area (your target audience?), it takes longer to decipher what it covers than I might wish - especially the Lake Delhi Area: clever design, but indecipherable.

Out of interest - why don't you want to use a common design for the two? Or are you coming up with a new common design using these two as starting points?

Ronald
03-17-2009, 09:19 PM
Out of interest - why don't you want to use a common design for the two? Or are you coming up with a new common design using these two as starting points?First off, thank you for the comments, Lois. As for a common design, I initially wanted to base the map cover off the guide cover - modifying some colors and altering text. But, for the sake of distinction, variety, and challenging myself as a designer, thought it would be better if I could make a fresh design that shares characteristics of the guide cover (colors, fonts, etc).

I agree that the guide cover is not spectacular and an overall pretty standard design, but at my age I'm content with it. I also think it looks better than the old guide which was created by a printing company and used basic Photoshop bevel & emboss effects that look tossed together quickly. Plus the two county guides from this area that I was given as example are so poor they'd make you want to scratch your eyes out.

LoisWakeman
03-18-2009, 02:41 AM
About the guide cover - I didn't mean to be as disparaging as it came out! It is a professional looking design and exactly as I would expect one to be (which is good - tourists probably like to feel comfortable in selecting these things) - the map is a more exciting design but not as usable.

dogmandouglas
03-19-2009, 10:55 AM
Hi Ronald

Looking at your design for the map leaflet, it seems to me to be "top heavy". The font also reminds me of Chinese writing, especially with the words reading down and across.

Why not change the image to greyscale (or single colour) to fade it into the background, incorporate some traffic signs.

Make it a bit more mappy.

ElyseC
03-19-2009, 01:36 PM
My biggest frustration is that the aerial photo is used the same way in both covers, but it's very practical for both. The map cover is also less intricate and full compared to the guide. It feels somewhat incomplete.Is there any more to the image widthwise? I guess the thing I think might be confusing is that Manchester is shown prominently in both when the maps brochure covers more than just the city. If there's more to the image on the left and right, maybe you can reduce it a bit and shift it off center to show more of the lake and countryside and not feature the city so directly. You could also do something like dogmandouglas suggests and see what the image looks like as a duotone. You could also use the same curving, top banner as the brochure for the city, but make it a different color. The brochures would be consistent in look, but different enough to distinguish them.

These kinds of brochures usually sit in racks and volunteers in tourism offices will point people to them by saying "grab the one with the green top for information on____."

Just a few thoughts from a fellow Iowan. :)

Ronald
03-22-2009, 12:38 AM
Below are two new designs that I like better. I took dogmandouglas' advice by working off the shape of a road sign for the primary designs; although, I'm not sure if I prefer the "Maps Inside" gimmick or the vertical "Maps" text. I also like the actual map lines (used at the top) and am playing around with the aerial photo as ElyseC suggested. Thanks to both of you.

I like the very top design on the left-hand cover but almost more as a logo than how it stands on the cover in such narrow dimensions. As a whole cover design, the right-hand version might be superior. It's also tricky finding an appropriate transparency for the aerial photo.

http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v402/batmanytb/MapAlts.jpg

dogmandouglas
03-22-2009, 09:48 AM
Hi Ronald

Much prefer your latest design. I agree that the left hand design could be used as a logo.

Cheers Doug

Hugh Wyn Griffith
03-22-2009, 01:53 PM
Having lived where mail from time to time reached me via New Hampshire with "Try England" on it, should the State not appear anywhere?

Tourists might even take .org as standing for Oregon ..... <s>

Seriously, I had to quite a bit of Googling to find out which Manchester it is.

Michael Rowley
03-22-2009, 02:46 PM
Hugh:
Having lived where mail from time to time reached me via New Hampshire with "Try England" on it, should the State not appear anywhere?I thought Americans always specify the state, even if the original town, Manchester, is quite well known. However, the map cover on the right gave us a clue. But you are right: there probably a lot of Manchesters in the USA and possibly Canada or Australia.

Steve Rindsberg
03-22-2009, 04:01 PM
Hugh:
I thought Americans always specify the state, even if the original town, Manchester, is quite well known. However, the map cover on the right gave us a clue. But you are right: there probably a lot of Manchesters in the USA and possibly Canada or Australia.
Michael,

Only 30 or 40. In the US, anyhow.

In fact, I'd guess there are nearly that many towns named after every town of size in England/Ireland/Scotland.

Then there are the Lincolns and Washingtons.

And heaven help us, the biblical names. Shiloh ... something like 60 of 'em.
Last time I looked, Alabama had three or four and Texas seven.

Appending the state name isn't enough ... we need to supply the postal code as well <g>

Michael Rowley
03-22-2009, 04:47 PM
Steve:
I'd guess there are nearly that many towns named after every town of size in England/Ireland/ScotlandYes, of course. But it's is surprising that Manchester should be a popular name in the United States, since although Manchester had a pretty old beginning as a Roman castrum (like all -chesters), it wasn't more than a market town until the late eighteenth century. But by the middle of the nineteenth it had become a city, and eventually it became the centre of a large conurbation.

Then there are the Lincolns and WashingtonsYou'd expect Lincoln, the old city that lends its name to Lincolnshire, to be popular, but I suppose the Washingtons are named after the prominent rebel of that name rather than the after a smallish village in, I think, Co. Durham.

Ronald
03-22-2009, 05:30 PM
Well it looks like people favor these new designs better, so if you folks choose one over the other, I'll probably go with that.

As for the ambiguous city name, I'd think having "manchesteriowa.org" would be informing enough that it's in Iowa. Worth considering though. Speaking of which, the visitors guide I designed includes a legend regarding the Manchester, Iowa name:

Manchester was originally platted out as Burrington, but in the 1850s the postal department refused to recognize that name as it was considered to be too similar to Burlington. The story goes that the founders of the community were meeting in one of the downtown stores one evening trying to come up with a new name for the community when Judge Dyer, founder of Dyersville and one of Manchester’s co-developers, suggested that it be named after his partner and the co-developer, Chester Mann. It was commonly accepted that Mr. Mann was not well liked and several people objected to this name and left the meeting at a standstill. However, a young store employee, busy sweeping the floor but with one ear cocked to the conversation, spoke up and suggested that the name be turned around into Manchester instead of Chestermann. The rest is history.

...I doubt it's true, but what the heck.

annc
03-23-2009, 01:23 AM
Seriously, I had to quite a bit of Googling to find out which Manchester it is.I've been wondering for days where the rest of the city was in the photo. It was only this evening that I looked at the rest of the 'logo' and saw the word 'county'. The penny finally dropped... :)

Mike
03-23-2009, 01:33 AM
In fact, I'd guess there are nearly that many towns named after every town of size in England/Ireland/Scotland.

Then there are the Lincolns and Washingtons.


I'd always assumed Washington was named after the village of the same name in Northumberland, England. Likewise New York which is a village very close to Washington.

annc
03-23-2009, 01:34 AM
As for the ambiguous city name, I'd think having "manchesteriowa.org" would be informing enough that it's in Iowa.But that text is so small as to be insignificant. I hadn't even read it until I read your last post.

As an Australian over 45, the only Manchester I knew of before reading the last few messages in this thread is the one in England; the one I learnt about in studies of the industrial revolution at school. No Manchesters here at all. So a logo or other printed material, particularly one with a very strong Manchester in the crucial top left position, is going to mean that Manchester until or unless you give me lots of obvious information to indicate otherwise.

Just one point of view, of course, but as it's mine... :)

Steve Rindsberg
03-23-2009, 08:19 AM
>> Yes, of course. But it's is surprising that Manchester should be a popular name in the United States

I'm just speculating but ...

At least in the US Northeast, the towns might have been so named because a few original settlers happened to have come from Manchester. The size of the original town may not have been all that important.

Their descendants may've pushed west and named the places they settled in after their home town in the New England rather than the Merry Olde ...

ktinkel
03-23-2009, 09:14 AM
Who knows? Could be true.

Anyway, the U.S. is full of Manchesters, including these:
Alabama
Connecticut
Georgia
Indiana
Iowa
Kentucky
Maine
Maryland
Massachussetts
Missouri
New Hampshire
Tennessee
Vermont
VirginiaI have no idea how many more there are. (Lots of schools named Manchester too, not necessarily in towns of the same name.)

don Arnoldy
03-23-2009, 09:49 AM
You'd expect Lincoln, the old city that lends its name to Lincolnshire, to be popular...Most of the Lincolns in the US were founded in the last half of the 19th century—more likely to have been named for the assassinated president than for the town in England.

--don

Ronald
03-23-2009, 10:27 AM
Hmm. Despite swerving off topic, this has probably been my most popular thread on here.

I guess I just assumed the visitors guide and map would be given out very close to or within Manchester, Iowa, so noting Iowa didn't seem significant. But if people are coming from other states or other counties, it probably should be added. Hopefully enough people would understand the postal abbreviation "IA." I think having that, in addition to "manchesteriowa.org" should suffice. The inside contents also name Iowa on the specific map labels.

I'll also add it to the cover of the visitors guide. I was hoping not having "visitors guide" on the cover would be fine; people could assume it's a local promotional brochure of some sort with the illustrative photos and such.

sky4forums
03-23-2009, 12:59 PM
Most of the Lincolns in the US were founded in the last half of the 19th century—more likely to have been named for the assassinated president than for the town in England.

--don
I suspect he knew that and was gently pulling someone's leg. (-:

Steve Rindsberg
03-23-2009, 01:23 PM
Apologies for the thread hijacking. But it does happen around here from time to time, and it's one of the charms of the place.

Thanks for taking it in good humor. Or humour. Depending on which Manchester we're in today.

annc
03-23-2009, 01:50 PM
But if people are coming from other states or other counties, it probably should be added. Hopefully enough people would understand the postal abbreviation "IA."Sorry, but most people outside the US have trouble remembering the names of all the states. The abbreviations, apart from the few well-known or obvious ones, are a mystery to us. I know IA is Iowa, but only because Elyse lives there. It could be Idaho, after all. If asked to give you the abbreviation for Iowa, I'd have to think hard before I answered. And as for those of the states starting with 'M', I am hopelessly lost for all of them.

But don't worry, I won't ask you to tell me how many states and territories Australia has, or their abbreviations. :)

Hugh Wyn Griffith
03-23-2009, 03:00 PM
The one I remember started its journey in Australia ......

Hugh Wyn Griffith
03-23-2009, 03:05 PM
I was driving back from Myrtle Beach to Greenville SC once using the "inland roads" and not the interstates and in the middle of nowhere (literally) I spotted a historic marker and stopped to look at it. It refered to the fact that the town of Manchester was once located here .....

Hugh Wyn Griffith
03-23-2009, 03:10 PM
<< As an Australian over 45, the only Manchester I knew >>

That explains that letter then! See my explanation <g>

Michael Rowley
03-23-2009, 05:49 PM
Ronald:

I just assumed the visitors guide and map would be given out very close to or within Manchester, Iowa
I should think it not politic for anyone involved in the promotion of Manchester, Iowa, to suggest that someone from another US state or another country would not be interested in the town. So write out Iowa in full, rather than using its postcode address.

You're rather bound by the format to be adopted, but Manchester, Iowa, in all capitals is certain to take a lot of space. Have you considered l.c.? It might be just as readable. And you should appreciate not having to promote Sault Sainte Marie, Michigan!

Steve Rindsberg
03-24-2009, 07:53 AM
I was driving back from Myrtle Beach to Greenville SC once using the "inland roads" and not the interstates and in the middle of nowhere (literally) I spotted a historic marker and stopped to look at it. It refered to the fact that the town of Manchester was once located here .....
... but didn't like the mosquitos and moved back to England.