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In conthext
10-05-2008, 06:20 AM
Hi there,

I am putting together a university magazine using In-Design. While I have always been interested in things 'print', I have never designed anything that has had to be printed professionally. Anyway, charged with my first ever DTP project that will meet the press, I went to the university publisher, and in a foreign language, I was told that my budget would be enough for a '4-colored cover and blended colored printing for the inside pages'.

My burning questions right now are how do those color options impact on my design choices? Presumably a 4-color cover pretty much means full color. Is that right? And does 'blended' mean 2 colors?

I hope some of my questioning makes some sense to someone...somewhere.

Thanks a bunch.

Mike

ktinkel
10-05-2008, 08:56 AM
It sounds as if he will print the cover in 4-color offset. That means photos or other continuous-tone artwork rendered in halftones of cyan, magenta, yellow, and black inks (CMYK). That is normal.

“Blended color printing” is a bit more puzzling. It might mean that the interior pages will be printed on a toner-based device — not on offset press — but one that can display mixed CMY colors. In that case you can use many colors, but need to create them by mixing them in the computer. You cannot see the results on your monitor, so will need to test.

I suggest that you return to the printer with queries and a to-do list:

Find out what process will be used to print both color and interior pages (offset printing with ink; digital printing and if the latter, what sort?).
Look at examples of jobs similar to yours.
Look at examples of the blended colors and ask what proportions of which base colors were used for the effects you like.
Look at samples of covers as well, and ask if you can print full color on the insides as well as the outsides.
Look at paper samples available.
Check on what page size prints most economically and ask about bleed (whether you can color or images to flow off the edges of the page).
Ask for advice on the technical aspects of how best to produce files for printing your job: how to set up pages, allow for trimming and binding (i.e., margins), allow for bleed. What kind of file does he prefer (PDF, most likely; then how should it be set up?)

You can work with any system, but you do need to know its limitations and pitfalls.

Do let us know how you are progressing and whether you have more questions. The job sounds like fun.

In conthext
10-05-2008, 10:00 PM
ktinkel, I really appreciate your comments/advice.

Yes, indeed, the project feels like fun. And it feels like I am going to learn a lot about DTP, which is the really fun part.

Armed with checklist, I plan head to the press as soon as I can.

I have another question: if I were to just use black and white for the inside pages, would that ease my burden a little, especially considering my 'newbishness'?

Cheers.

ktinkel
10-06-2008, 08:16 AM
I have another question: if I were to just use black and white for the inside pages, would that ease my burden a little, especially considering my 'newbishness'?Makes some sense, at least for the first couple of issues. But you will still need to confer with your printer on other issues, and adding color should not be difficult once you know all the “rules.”

By the way, when you talk to your printer ask how you should provide photos or other images. It is always good practice to scale photos to fit the layout in a program like Photoshop before placing them in the layout. But the printer should be able to advise you on resolution (the optimum halftone dot size, in particular), as that lets you know how to scan or modify the image for printing.

None of these questions will make you look foolish — we all need information from the printer because he has (and controls) all the equipment that will actually produce your magazine. You have to synchronize with him in order to do a good job.

annc
10-06-2008, 01:03 PM
By the way, when you talk to your printer ask how you should provide photos or other images. It is always good practice to scale photos to fit the layout in a program like Photoshop before placing them in the layout.Yes, it's a good idea to discuss this with the printer. These days, I find that printers will all accept (and usually prefer) PDFs.

Regarding the practice of scaling photos in Photoshop, I've been following Shane's advice since this thread in 2005 (http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/showthread.php?p=4003) and have never had a problem with jobs not printing or giving nasty surprises.

In conthext
10-06-2008, 07:34 PM
ktinkel and annc, I appreciate the positive advice.

OK. Got the checklist printed, including question about photos. Seeing the printer in about half an hour.

It's going to be an interesting conversation...in Thai!

I'll report back with my findings...

OK, repeat, none of these questions will make you look foolish — we all need information from the printer... none of these questions will make you look foolish — we all need information from the printer ...

In conthext
10-10-2008, 01:12 AM
Came back from the printer's with a bit more confidence, and quite a few of the checklist boxes ticked.

And of the things that have confused/baffled me since then, I have tried to overcome by hitting the books/online tutes/posts etc.

Right now, my main issue is font. I learned at university that sans-serif titles and headings work well with serif typefaces in the body text. Should this principle be applied to text in a light weight entertainment magazine?

Cheers,

Mike

ktinkel
10-10-2008, 08:23 AM
Came back from the printer's with a bit more confidence, and quite a few of the checklist boxes ticked.Great!

Right now, my main issue is font. I learned at university that sans-serif titles and headings work well with serif typefaces in the body text. Should this principle be applied to text in a light weight entertainment magazine?Some sans faces work well with some serifs, some don’t. The practice of mixing is relatively new (dating to the late 19th, earth 20th century). Before that, pages of type were set in serif, period. Hardly even used bold.

However, you might consider it for a contemporary entertainment magazine. I would consider, instead, a slab serif — like PMN Caecelia (http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/pmn-caecilia/), say, which comes in a wide range of weights — for both purposes.

I mention Caecelia because it is extremely legible in text sizes, say 9 to 11 point (though it does better on uncoated stock than coated), gives a nice recessive “color” to the page (which is desirable if you have a lot of pictures and/or ads — they should be allowed to pop out at the reader).

At the same time, when used large for heads (or medium large for callouts), the characters are attractive. And if you want to use italics (for captions or callouts, say), even the italics are pretty and readable.

If you really think you need a sans for heads — if you want the pages to look edgy and hard-nosed rather than relaxed — look for a type family with several weights and widths (like ITC Franklin Gothic (http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/adobe/itc-franklin-gothic/)), which is especially useful for its condensed widths. At large headline sizes, the Demi Compressed can be very useful in narrow magazine columns. With that I would use a Scotch Roman (or even better, Miller) for the text.

terrie
10-11-2008, 05:01 PM
kt: like PMN Caecelia (http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/pmn-caecilia/),I like that font! Not too pricey either...

Terrie

In conthext
10-22-2008, 01:13 AM
...you might consider it for a contemporary entertainment magazine. I would consider, instead, a slab serif — like PMN Caecelia (http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/pmn-caecilia/), say, which comes in a wide range of weights — for both purposes.


Appreciate the suggestion ktinkel. So many font 'type' questions have been embossed on the brain. Love it.

So effectively it would be PMN Caecelia, at various weights and sizes etc., for all text in the magazine?

Is the use of one font typical for contemporary entertainment magazines?

Finally, after speaking to the 'boss', it was suggested that a sans for the magazine text might provide a better feel. I took a look at Miller (that's really, really nice actually) but found it just a tad too formal for our project. Are there any fonts that you or anyone else can suggest?

Thanks.

ktinkel
10-22-2008, 07:19 AM
Text should be formal, or plain, or whatever — it must be readable. Display (heads, and so on) can be more expressive, but you probably still want your readers to be able to read them.

As for what’s typical in an entertainment magazine, hard to say — they vary more than most. But any magazine that takes ads will need to keep the editorial matter subdued enough to separate it from paid advertising.

If you decide to consider sans serif heads, look for a type family that has a good range of weights and widths. FontBureau has many of such faces. I especially like Truth FB (http://www.fontbureau.com/magazine/fonts/display/TruthFB), but you can cycle through a large collection from that page using the arrows at top left. Check out Scout (used in Entertainment Weekly) magazine and Stainless (used in Premiere), among others (I like Roxy and Titling Gothic as well).

In conthext
10-22-2008, 11:34 PM
Yes, very promising link.