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ktinkel
02-03-2008, 07:25 PM
There have been Super Bowls since the year Jack and I got married. I have never had more than a passing interest in the game.

But for some reason it caught my eye this year — and my team won!

I actually sort of kind of understand what sports fans get so excited about.

And boy — wish I had bet money on the Giants! <g> (Though I am not a betting woman.)

ElyseC
02-03-2008, 07:31 PM
There have been Super Bowls since the year Jack and I got married. I have never had more than a passing interest in the game.

But for some reason it caught my eye this year — and my team won!

I actually sort of kind of understand what sports fans get so excited about.

And boy — wish I had bet money on the Giants! <g> (Though I am not a betting woman.)Yay, Giants! That's who we were rooting for in this house, too.

I was sort of watching, but really only to see good commercials. I didn't see them all, but I don't think this was a great year for clever or otherwise memorable commercials. Some years have been spectacular, but this one was underwhelming. Darn.

ktinkel
02-03-2008, 08:02 PM
… underwhelming. Darn.I’ll say.

Some were downright tawdry. Pity.

We need an advertising Super Bowl!

ElyseC
02-03-2008, 08:26 PM
We need an advertising Super Bowl!Hear hear!

This (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SmgLtg1Izw) from several Superbowls ago is one of my all time favorite commercials.

From last year (or was it two years ago?) I got a big kick out of the "magic fridg (http://youtube.com/watch?v=FxR9y4clSog)e." Not sure why, but that one tickled me no end.

dthomsen8
02-04-2008, 11:53 AM
Yay, Giants! That's who we were rooting for in this house, too.

I was sort of watching, but really only to see good commercials. I didn't see them all, but I don't think this was a great year for clever or otherwise memorable commercials. Some years have been spectacular, but this one was underwhelming. Darn.

Many of the Superbowl commercials are available online. I have seen links on TV and in the Wall Street Journal. I liked the one where the Charlie Brown balloon hugged the CocaCola bottle.

ElyseC
02-04-2008, 03:18 PM
Many of the Superbowl commercials are available online. I have seen links on TV and in the Wall Street Journal. I liked the one where the Charlie Brown balloon hugged the CocaCola bottle.My son and I liked that one, too. Son cried gleefully, "Charlie Brown got it!" having many times lamented poor ol' Charlie's continual rotten luck.

Yes, indeed, the commercials are available on line, along with sites to rate them. YouTube has a bunch of the old ones, too, including the Xerox monk and Apple's "1984". The actor who played the monk was the Xerox in-booth celeb at trade shows, maybe even as recently as 15 years ago. He was there at one of the last Gutenberg Festivals in Long Beach, CA that I attended.

marlene
02-05-2008, 11:01 PM
ROFL! I'd never seen the cat commercial. It's hilarious. I love the part where the guy is using the lint roller.

mxh

marlene
02-05-2008, 11:05 PM
I've never watched a football game, Super or regular. Mr. E went out to watch it with friends, and when he got back, he asked me (knowing full well I would not have watched the actual game) if I had watched the Superbowl commercials. <LOL>

I hadn't -- I figured I could see 'em on Youtube. <g>

mxh

Michael Rowley
02-06-2008, 09:23 AM
Marlene:

I've never watched a football game

Now you given the game away! I though KT was talking about the Ladies Bowling team. Why 'Super Bowls'?

marlene
02-06-2008, 11:56 AM
Why 'Super Bowls'?

"Bowls" refers to the stadiums and/or the important games played therein. No tenpins, duckpins, ninepins, skittles, skeeball or bocce.

mxh

ktinkel
02-06-2008, 12:25 PM
Hear hear!

This (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1SmgLtg1Izw) from several Superbowls ago is one of my all time favorite commercials.

From last year (or was it two years ago?) I got a big kick out of the "magic fridg (http://youtube.com/watch?v=FxR9y4clSog)e." Not sure why, but that one tickled me no end.Good ones.

I remember the Magic Fridge, had missed the cat-herding one.

Michael Rowley
02-06-2008, 04:08 PM
Marlene:

No tenpins, duckpins, ninepins, skittles, skeeball or bocce

I should think not! Bowls is played on a bowling green in England, or at worst, in a hall, in which case it may be televised. Obviously, North American allusions go right over our heads. Your American term 'ball-park figures' (now frequently used in England), for instance, was only vaguely connected in my mind with attendance at some sort of ball game, and it was only recently I found out what a ball park was.

ElyseC
02-06-2008, 08:07 PM
ROFL! I'd never seen the cat commercial. It's hilarious. I love the part where the guy is using the lint roller.The "living a dream" bit always cracks me up.

ElyseC
02-06-2008, 08:20 PM
Obviously, North American allusions go right over our heads. Your American term 'ball-park figures' (now frequently used in England), for instance, was only vaguely connected in my mind with attendance at some sort of ball game, and it was only recently I found out what a ball park was.Yes, sports references are so much a part of North American English. I didn't realize how much a part they are until I began working with a global company and got puzzled silence during phone calls and requests for explanations in email. When I realized why, I began paying close attention to the expressions I was using and had to work at omitting all sports terms and expressions.

It wouldn't be such an issue were the terms and expressions from soccer, but seems to me the majority come from football and baseball, predominantly North American games.

If Brits and related others used, say, cricket terms and expressions, I'm sure it would be my turn to be bewildered.

dthomsen8
02-07-2008, 04:29 AM
Yes, sports references are so much a part of North American English. I didn't realize how much a part they are until I began working with a global company and got puzzled silence during phone calls and requests for explanations in email. When I realized why, I began paying close attention to the expressions I was using and had to work at omitting all sports terms and expressions.

It wouldn't be such an issue were the terms and expressions from soccer, but seems to me the majority come from football and baseball, predominantly North American games.

If Brits and related others used, say, cricket terms and expressions, I'm sure it would be my turn to be bewildered.

Sticky wicket?

ElyseC
02-07-2008, 07:57 AM
Sticky wicket?OK, I do understand that one. Didn't know it came from cricket, thought it came from croquet.

dthomsen8
02-07-2008, 10:06 AM
"Bowls" refers to the stadiums and/or the important games played therein. No tenpins, duckpins, ninepins, skittles, skeeball or bocce.

mxh
The Rose Bowl (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bowl_games)was the first college bowl to start, in 1902. Apparently the name was taken from the Yale Bowl, the stadium of the Ivy League Yale University football stadium. In the early years, bowl games were all college games, until the NFL started using the term for its post-season Pro Bowl, and later for the final game of the playoffs as the SuperBowl.

I am guessing that the term "ballpark" as in "I want a ballpark figure," when asking for a rough estimate, comes from the fact that major league baseball parks and their playing fields have widely varying sizes, and therefore the size of the park can be questioned. American football fields are all the same size, but of course the stands vary considerably. Canadian football fields have a standard size, different from the American standard.

Steve Rindsberg
02-07-2008, 11:56 AM
And here I thought it was a Spoonerism for "wicky sticket".

Of course, I have no idea what *that* means.

iamback
02-07-2008, 11:57 AM
me neither!

Howard Allen
02-07-2008, 02:39 PM
I didn't think "ballpark" had anything to do with varying sizes of different ballparks, but rather "anywhere within the bounds of the ballpark". To say you hit the ball "in the ballpark" isn't giving a precise location (or figure), but somewhere within reasonable bounds (a rough, but constrained estimate) as opposed to "outside the park" which could be anywhere.

I recently learned--to my surprise--that "hat trick" (3 goals in a game)--a hockey term, originally comes from cricket.

ElyseC
02-10-2008, 02:40 PM
I recently learned--to my surprise--that "hat trick" (3 goals in a game)--a hockey term, originally comes from cricket.And in the 1982 movie Chariots of Fire, it was used in reference to track event wins by one of the main characters.

cdanddvdpublisher
02-10-2008, 04:46 PM
I enjoyed reading the threads in this post for some reason. The different perspectives between genders and UK/US particpants are interesting. "Wicky Sticket" made me laugh - ha ha. Funny one.

I was surprised that no one mentioned the Mannings. How rare it is that two brothers playing the same position win back-to-back games, let alone the game of games. It will be a long time, I think, before that record is broken.

ktinkel
02-10-2008, 06:54 PM
I was surprised that no one mentioned the Mannings. How rare it is that two brothers playing the same position win back-to-back games, let alone the game of games. It will be a long time, I think, before that record is broken.True enough. Especially as the local (i.e., NYC-area) press had been unrelenting toward Eli.

And then suddenly, a turnaround, and it was all as expected.

What can you say: sports pundits are as unreasonable as political ones!