PDA

View Full Version : Well, well, well . . .


iamback
01-09-2008, 10:11 AM
Or just install a hand pump, of course, like in the good old days.

Michael Rowley
01-09-2008, 10:50 AM
Marjolein:

Or just install a hand pump

Or use bucket on a rope (and, preferably, winding gear); then you're independent of atmospheric pressure.

ElyseC
01-09-2008, 12:17 PM
Or just install a hand pump, of course, like in the good old days.There apparently is some kind of hand pump out there in the yard, but I'll be darned if I'm going out there to pump water and haul it into the house when I can just fill the tubs! A lot easier on the back, neck and shoulders (which have sustained too many whiplash injuries in the past 18 years).

ElyseC
01-09-2008, 12:19 PM
Or use bucket on a rope (and, preferably, winding gear); then you're independent of atmospheric pressure.Nah, that's an wishing well, not a modern well 1,500 feet deep. No way to get a bucket down ours, not unless it's a rather skinny or tiny one!

Michael Rowley
01-09-2008, 01:01 PM
Elyse:

that's an wishing well, not a modern well 1,500 feet deepYou can't use a suction pump to raise water from more than about 10 m; you'd have to have an immersion pump pushing the water up, or lift it by stages. Of course, if it's an artesian well there's no problem: you don't need a pump. There's no limit to the depth of a well emptied by a bucket on a rope: the same system is used in mines.

annc
01-09-2008, 06:19 PM
Elyse:

You can't use a suction pump to raise water from more than about 10 m; you'd have to have an immersion pump pushing the water up, or lift it by stages. Of course, if it's an artesian well there's no problem: you don't need a pump. There's no limit to the depth of a well emptied by a bucket on a rope: the same system is used in mines.I think Elyse's well is what we call a bore. Mine is only six inches wide...

Not all artesian wells are under pressure. Most here require windmills (http://www.southcross.com.au/windmills) to pump the water up.

ElyseC
01-09-2008, 06:32 PM
I think Elyse's well is what we call a bore. Mine is only six inches wide...

Not all artesian wells are under pressure. Most here require windmills (http://www.southcross.com.au/windmills) to pump the water up.Six to eight inches is what it looks like (from here -- I'm not in the mood to run out in the dark and cold to measure it, you see :)).

Mike
01-10-2008, 01:21 AM
I think Elyse's well is what we call a bore. Mine is only six inches wide...

Not all artesian wells are under pressure. Most here require windmills (http://www.southcross.com.au/windmills) to pump the water up.

Similar to ours. It's about 50m deep.

Shortly after being bored it turned artesian -- which doesn't mean we don't still have to pump it. It just means the water seeped out and filled the inspection chamber till they fitted a different style of well head.

Michael Rowley
01-10-2008, 06:38 AM
Ann:

Not all artesian wells are under pressure
They must: the water is forced up; but the pressure may not be sufficient for the water to reach the surface. As to the bore of the well, it must be just enough to allow whatever means is chosen to raise the water to the surface.

dthomsen8
01-11-2008, 12:41 PM
After all the discussions of water and sewage problems in the countryside, I should count city water and city sewerage services as one of my blessings.

ElyseC
01-13-2008, 04:27 PM
After all the discussions of water and sewage problems in the countryside, I should count city water and city sewerage services as one of my blessings.At the moment, only during power outages is there concern over water and a well-maintained septic system is no problem.

It's nice to not have monthly water and sewer bills to pay.