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View Full Version : Liverwurst, PB&J, what next?


Cristen Gillespie
12-19-2007, 09:45 AM
What do you do with sandwiches if you don't eat them?

LOL. The bread in sandwiches is intended to hold the ingredients. I eat the ingredients. The bread gets consumed as an edible package, but it doesn't have to be bread I'd eat by itself in rapturous pleasure.<G>

Eating bread is bread for eating as it is, nothing to distract from its flavor and texture. At least nothing so overwhelming as PB&J or Liverwurst. A touch of butter or olive oil, no more, and if it's a slice of heaven that way, it's good bread. Thus it can be so full of holes it could never hold the mayo, but still be a perfect bread. Not a sandwich bread. ;-}

Michael Rowley
12-19-2007, 10:54 AM
Cristen:

as PB&J or Liverwurst

Liverwurst is recognizably Leberwurst or liver sausage, but PB&J? Incidentally, bread that's full of holes just has been made with insufficient salt; yeast needs salt something other for nucleation (to form many small bubbles of carbon dioxide).

iamback
12-19-2007, 01:04 PM
Liverwurst is recognizably Leberwurst or liver sausage, but PB&J?Peanut butter and jam.

Not the combination I prefer - I like peanut butter and sambal (or Surinam peanut butter which has the pepper right in it already!) or peanut butter and ground hard Swiss cheese.

Michael Rowley
12-19-2007, 03:49 PM
Marjolein:

Peanut butter and jam

Actually, it's peanut butter and jelly, I think. But I'm with you on the bread for sandwiches: it should be like the other bread one eats (though sandwiches are preferably made from a loaf with square section).

Cristen Gillespie
12-20-2007, 08:03 AM
Cristen:



Liverwurst is recognizably Leberwurst or liver sausage, but PB&J? Incidentally, bread that's full of holes just has been made with insufficient salt; yeast needs salt something other for nucleation (to form many small bubbles of carbon dioxide).

PB&J is normally translated to Peanut Butter & Jelly, but Jam, as Marjolean said, will do. I don't care for it, prefering peanut butter and tomato.

As for holes, no, insufficient salt isn't the only reason for holes. But you probably need to read The Bread Baker's Apprentice or something similarly technical to know the many reasons for holes in bread. Coarse texture could be a better description for the intended variety. Anyone who bakes bread knows that they can arise both on purpose, and through careless technique.

Michael Rowley
12-20-2007, 11:17 AM
Cristen:

But you probably need to read The Bread Baker's Apprentice or something similarly technical to know the many reasons for holes in bread

Yes, I expect that there are other reasons than too little salt for holes in bread. Perhaps I was too impressed by the demonstration of what happens with too little salt at the (British) Army School of Catering in 1950. I have to confess that I haven't studied bread-baking since then.

Is all jam called jelly in the USA? I've always wondered. Here, we only use the term for preserves made from juice (e.g quince jelly), i.e. those that contain no solid matter.

ElyseC
12-20-2007, 03:10 PM
I've always wondered. Here, we only use the term for preserves made from juice (e.g quince jelly), i.e. those that contain no solid matter.It's the same here in the States, yes, but whether one uses jam or jelly with the PB, most people refer to the sandwich as PB and jelly.

Michael Rowley
12-21-2007, 07:09 AM
Elyse:

most people refer to the sandwich as PB and jelly

Ah! Thanks. I couldn't imagine such a concoction, so didn't instantly recognize 'PB&J'. I like peanut butter on bread or toast, but never in a sandwich and never with jam (just salt).

Cristen Gillespie
12-21-2007, 08:52 AM
Michael: I like peanut butter on bread or toast, but never in a sandwich and never with jam (just salt).

You add salt to your peanut butter and bread? Isn't your PB already salty enough?

I like butter and PB toasted under the broiler, but don't make toast, then put the PB on it. But my favorite use of peanut butter is in a saté (sometimes I've seen spelled satay). A peanut butter sauce with chicken is one of the best ways to eat peanut butter.

Well, that and good peanut butter cookies. <BG>

ktinkel
12-21-2007, 08:59 AM
A peanut butter sauce with chicken is one of the best ways to eat peanut butter.Satay is nice, but I like peanut butter even better in Strange Taste Chicken. The recipe calls for sesame butter, but it is difficult to find a non-rancid bottle of that, so I use peanut butter.

The sauce also includes Sichuan pepper, chili sauce, garlic, and soy, etc. This is a fabulous dish.

You can also use the sauce to dress noodles, skipping the chicken (or have both). Some seeded and cut-up cucumber is nice to have on the side.

dthomsen8
12-21-2007, 09:48 AM
Satay is nice, but I like peanut butter even better in Strange Taste Chicken. The recipe calls for sesame butter, but it is difficult to find a non-rancid bottle of that, so I use peanut butter.

The sauce also includes Sichuan pepper, chili sauce, garlic, and soy, etc. This is a fabulous dish.

You can also use the sauce to dress noodles, skipping the chicken (or have both). Some seeded and cut-up cucumber is nice to have on the side.

I must say that reading this thread, and some earlier ones in here, that our forum members like a really big variety of foods, and some a bit strange.

Having said that, I must say that my Chinese wife eats canned creamed corn in her Vanilla ice cream. I restrict myself to some nutmeg or cinnamon on mine.

ktinkel
12-21-2007, 12:54 PM
I must say that reading this thread, and some earlier ones in here, that our forum members like a really big variety of foods, and some a bit strange.

Having said that, I must say that my Chinese wife eats canned creamed corn in her Vanilla ice cream. I restrict myself to some nutmeg or cinnamon on mine.Just as you said — some a bit strange! ;)

Cristen Gillespie
12-22-2007, 10:29 AM
KT: Strange Taste Chicken. The recipe calls for sesame butter, but it is difficult to find a non-rancid bottle of that, so I use peanut butter.

That sounds like a recipe I could like. Available on Cooks? I have to be careful now because many recipes, especially Thai, call for using a fish sauce, and all the bottles I've read contain shrimp<sigh>

ktinkel
12-22-2007, 12:36 PM
That sounds like a recipe I could like. Available on Cooks? I have to be careful now because many recipes, especially Thai, call for using a fish sauce, and all the bottles I've read contain shrimp<sigh>I have never encountered a Chinese recipe that calls for fish sauce, which is widely used in other Asian cuisines. The Chinese do like dried shrimp, which can appear in some dishes, but not all that many.

Not on Cooks, but I can give you my recipe. The dish is close to one called bon-bon (or bong-bong) chicken, which is close to one we used to call hacked chicken. And the sauce is similar to the ones often used for cold Sichuan noodles.

But this one has tons of character, and it satisfies the Sichuan fondness for “a bizarre but deeply satisfying combination of salty, sweet, sour, nutty, hot, and numbing flavors,” to quote Fuchsia Dunlop, whose wonderful book Land of Plenty is more or less the source of what is now my favorite version.

* * *
Strange-Taste Chicken
guai wei ji si

1 lb cooked, cooled chicken (commercial roast chickens work fine)
6 to 8 scallions, white mostly
1 cucumber (optional)
1 tablespoon white sugar
salt
1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon Chinkiang or black Chinese vinegar (or use balsamic)
3 tablespoons Chinese sesame paste (or use good peanut butter)
1 tablespoon Asian sesame oil
2 tablespoons Chinese chile sauce
1 teaspoon roasted, ground Sichuan peppercorns
3 teaspoons toasted sesame seeds (or use crushed roasted peanuts)
coriander leaves for garnish (optional)

Cut the chicken into shreds about 1/2 inch by 2 inches.

Cut the scallions into 2-inch sections and then slice them lengthwise into fine slivers. Refresh them in a bowl of cold water (they will curl a bit).

Peel the cucumber, cut it in quarters the long way, cut off (or spoon out) the seeds, and slice into small crescents. Salt it lightly, and place in a sieve to drain for at least 15 minutes.

Blend together the sugar, salt, soy sauce, and vinegar. Stir the sesame paste or peanut butter (to blend in the oil), then stir it into the soy sauce/vinegar mixture. Add the sesame oil, chili sauce, and the ground Sichuan pepper, and mix well. (I often use my immersion blender for this.)

Just before serving, drain the scallions and mound them in the middle of a serving platter. Arrange the optional cucumber bits around the outside. Place the chicken slivers on top of the scallions, and pour the sauce over the top. Sprinkle the sesame seeds or crushed peanuts over the top, garnish with the optional coriander leaves, and serve.

The same sauce (with or without shreds of chicken) works well as a dressing for cold noodles; I like to use it on Japanese buckwheat noodles.

Adapted from Land of Plenty: Authentic Sichuan recipes personally gathered in the Chinese province of Sichuan, by Fuchsia Dunlop.

dthomsen8
12-22-2007, 01:57 PM
I have never encountered a Chinese recipe that calls for fish sauce, which is widely used in other Asian cuisines. The Chinese do like dried shrimp, which can appear in some dishes, but not all that many.
...


The ancient Romans liked fish sauce, too. The Asian supermarkets in Philadelphia stock a wide variety of fish sauces, and other sauces, for that matter, including some spicy sauces which are Mexican in origin.

My Chinese wife likes to eat shrimp, but she is allergic to them, and scratches like mad when she does eat them.

Michael Rowley
12-22-2007, 03:12 PM
Dave:

The ancient Romans liked fish sauce

Modern Britons too (at least, this one does: I always make sure we've got Worcester Sauce).

iamback
12-23-2007, 08:57 AM
The ancient Romans liked fish sauce, too. The Asian supermarkets in Philadelphia stock a wide variety of fish sauces, and other sauces, for that matter, including some spicy sauces which are Mexican in origin.I first encountered fish sauce in Viet Nam - but I have never found a store here that carries it, only Thai fish sauce, which has a "stronger" taste.

Writing that, though, I suddenly get an idea - lately I've been buying my noodles from a Vietnamese woman on my neighborhood market (Vietnamese "instant" noodles!): I could ask her, maybe she knows a store or can (or already does!) import it herself. I much prefer Vietnamese fish sauce over Thai fish sauce. I use it only because I can't find what I really want... :(

ElyseC
12-23-2007, 08:58 AM
Yes, PB&J is a major kid favorite. A popular, related combo is PB and banana or (my fave) PB and apple. In both cases you slice the fruit very thinly.

Then there's "ants on a log" where you fill celery chunks with PB and dot the PB with raisins. YUM! It's a guaranteed way to get something green into almost any kid! :)

Cristen Gillespie
12-24-2007, 09:21 AM
KT: But this one has tons of character,

It sure sounds like it. Got it saved, thanks. Even in this town, we now have a large enough Asian contingent our groceries are carrying lots more than just Kikkoman's soy sauce<G>

Cristen Gillespie
12-24-2007, 09:26 AM
dthomsen8: My Chinese wife likes to eat shrimp, but she is allergic to them

Tell her to be careful, then. When I finally had a reaction to shrimp, it was so strong the doctor said next time could easily be an anaphylactic response. Allergies very often increase in severity as exposure to the source increases. In fact, if I were you, I'd consult a doctor about keeping an epi pen on hand if she's going to insist on eating something that causes a rash/hives.

ktinkel
12-24-2007, 10:38 AM
It sure sounds like it. Got it saved, thanks. Even in this town, we now have a large enough Asian contingent our groceries are carrying lots more than just Kikkoman's soy sauce<G>Our supermarkets do too, but a lot of it is rubbish. The Asian markets have the good stuff.

Even in our section of New England we have two Chinese and two Indian grocery stores. And in NYC, about an hour and some away, there are many, a few of them gigantic.

Cristen Gillespie
12-27-2007, 07:07 AM
KT: And in NYC, about an hour and some away, there are many, a few of them gigantic.

I'm sure LA also has many, some gigantic, but it's hardly worth getting through the traffic. What ought to be little more than an hour is more often 3. Fortunately, cooking ingredients in America is no longer the province of a few national companies and we can get variety even in rather backwater, provincial towns.