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Robin Springall
11-06-2007, 10:53 AM
Just found this delight (I'll try to do the link properly this time!) BBC link (http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/uk/7081038.stm)

As a result of the news, I've noticed the following:

* Politicians seemed unusually "with it" today in the house.
* Large number of boys have started collecting a rare fish that can only be bought in Liverpool.
* The sell-by date stamped on boxes of mince pies is 23 Dec. The consume-by date is 24th.
* Thousands of front doors in Scotland have jammed shut because of wet weather.
* The Police Officers Federation are holding a strike ballot, claiming that helmets attract unwanted attention to their wearers. (I was going to say "to their members" but thought better of it...)
* Scots flee York in droves.
* The Indonesian government issue barbed wire gloves to all boys on their 14th birthday. They quickly revise that to their 12th.
* Mirror sales have... No, don't even go there!
* The divorce rate in Switzerland rockets; queues of angry women seen at launderettes, carrying duvets.
* New craze in Florida: getting married by parachute. (Actually, by a priest, but you follow my drift.)

I think that's quite enough of that!
R

Mike
11-08-2007, 01:29 AM
<<It could be regarded an act of treason to place a postage stamp bearing the British king or queen's image upside-down >>

So how do they prove it isn't just the address that's written upside-down?

dthomsen8
11-14-2007, 04:38 AM
<<It could be regarded an act of treason to place a postage stamp bearing the British king or queen's image upside-down >>


In the United States, it is illegal to print stamps or issue coins with a living person on them. In the United Kingdom, it is required by law to do exactly that.

Mike
11-14-2007, 08:39 AM
But then other countries have to specify the country of origin...

We, of course, don't need to specify the origin - a picture of our Queen is clearly sufficient to inform the rest of the world that they should deliver anything with one of our stamps on it with the utmost speed and diligence.

terrie
11-14-2007, 02:38 PM
mike: a picture of our Queen is clearly sufficient to inform the rest of the world that they should deliver anything with one of our stamps on it with the utmost speed and diligence.LOL!!! '-}}

Terrie

Michael Rowley
11-14-2007, 03:08 PM
Mike:

We, of course, don't need to specify the origin

You don't mention that before postage stamps were invented in the UK, no one else knew of such a thing, but it is relevant.

The US law against having pictures of individuals (I didn't know it existed) seems logical in a country where the president has so much power but can exercise it for (now) only eight years; I should not like to even think of the purposes to which US postage stamps were not the subject of such laws.

Mike
11-15-2007, 01:03 AM
You don't mention that before postage stamps were invented in the UK, no one else knew of such a thing, but it is relevant.

Well, indeed it is, but I prefer to think of British postage stamps being rather like the old blue British passports -- just wave one in front of you and all the natives bow down and offer free passage.

A letter with a British stamp held in a cleft stick should receive exactly the same treatment.;)

dthomsen8
11-15-2007, 04:44 AM
Mike:

You don't mention that before postage stamps were invented in the UK, no one else knew of such a thing, but it is relevant.

The US law against having pictures of individuals (I didn't know it existed) seems logical in a country where the president has so much power but can exercise it for (now) only eight years; I should not like to even think of the purposes to which US postage stamps were not the subject of such laws.

This law is effective for stamps and coins, but not for a variety of "pork" projects, such as dams, courthouses, post office buildings and highways, which are named for members of the congress while they are in office, and paid for by the taxpayers.

I would repeat that deceased individuals, famous or obscure, are frequently placed on stamps. Coins and paper money mostly have presidents or cabinet members, or else the exceptional "founding father" such as the most famous early Philadelphia citizen, Benjamin Franklin.

Steve Rindsberg
11-15-2007, 06:50 AM
Ah but then there's all that saliva on the boots to deal with.

Mike
11-15-2007, 08:51 AM
Ah but then there's all that saliva on the boots to deal with.

Well, I guess having colonies and an empire does have its disadvantages.

Michael Rowley
11-15-2007, 12:50 PM
Steve:

but then there's all that saliva on the boots to deal with

Saliva is better than mud; and anyway, it saves your using your own spit when spit and polish is called for.

Richard Waller
11-16-2007, 11:26 PM
<<< for a variety of "pork" projects, such as dams >>>
I realy do not like naming airports after people. If I want to go to Liverpool I want to go to an airport of that name, not to John Lennon, which might be anywhere.

Michael Rowley
11-17-2007, 06:19 AM
Richard:

I really do not like naming airports after people

Why? Railway stations were often named after people (e.g. Euston), so why not airports, if there are several that serve one place? (If I want to go to Liverpool, I arrive at Lime Street: I shouldn't dream of flying there.)