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View Full Version : Brad and...how many million Harry Potter??


ElyseC
07-31-2007, 06:39 AM
Well, the series is now complete and our own Brad Walrod was the typesetter for books 3-7. Don't believe me? Look in the back of the book in the colophon. :)

Oh, and some here might remember the first time years ago that a forum member discovered that Brad was doing the HP typesetting. I don't recall who it was, but they posted a message about it titled something like "Brad and 8 million...." Hence the title of this post. :)

Congrats, Brad!

Franca
07-31-2007, 09:45 AM
Yep, Ann had me check the colophon in my Deluxe edition, and there he is. :)

terrie
07-31-2007, 12:22 PM
That was the first thing I looked at when I got my book home! I was hoping Brad might pop in and say hi...

Terrie

ElyseC
07-31-2007, 03:48 PM
That was the first thing I looked at when I got my book home! I was hoping Brad might pop in and say hi...I have a hunch he will soon. ;)

terrie
08-01-2007, 11:14 AM
elyse: I have a hunch he will soon. ;)Oh good! I always love his stories about the books...

Terrie

BradW
08-04-2007, 02:39 PM
Well, unlike the person who sent me a message 42 hours after the book's release, with the subject "Done" (and who started this thread), I just finished reading it an hour ago.

I guess I've been avoiding all discussion about the book for fear of spoilers (intended or accidental), even those about its production.

To answer the question in the thread title, the three numbers I know are: 12 million first-print press run, 8.3 million U.S.-edition copies sold in the first 24 hours, and 15 million sold worldwide in the same time span.

My biggest kick was seeing the book opened and being read on the cover of this week's Entertainment Weekly magazine, followed closely by the article inside in which the illistrator, continuity editor, and publisher were pictured and interviewed.

One minor point to clarify: I started working on the series at book 4, Goblet of Fire, the one for which the title wasn't known until a week before the pub date.

Brad

BradW
08-04-2007, 02:49 PM
Isn't that deluxe edition amazing? I've shown the unfolded dust jacket to a few friends so they could see the panoramic poster, and I love the black binding with the diamond design theme embossed on it.

Now that I'm finished reading my regular edition copy (the one I bought from Amazon so I could have it on the 21st!) I'm going to leaf through the full-page images of the chapter-opening art that make up the last signature and a quarter of the deluxe edition.

Granted, I looked at them a bit when I set the pages, trying to get the positioning just right, but they were just placed images at the time.

Brad

BradW
08-04-2007, 02:53 PM
Ugh: That colophon is the single most annoying page to typeset in all the books. Trying to get the diamond shape to look right in that point size, leading, and page size is a pain in the butt.

And remember, I had to set it x number of times due to the number of printers involved. But at least this time I was able to keep my name on one line. ;-)

Brad

annc
08-04-2007, 03:05 PM
Yep, Ann had me check the colophon in my Deluxe edition, and there he is. :)Lucky you! Our edition had no colophon at all, and when I grabbed a library copy to see if there was one this time, the borrower accused me of wanting to know the ending... :)

We have 20 copies, and at one stage there were 56 holds. Now it is down to 45, and I see that most copies are with their second readers.

Michael Rowley
08-04-2007, 03:23 PM
Ann:

Our edition had no colophon at all

Isn't 'your' edition the UK edition? (Or, rather, aren't they?) That's the way the publishers usually work. And I think a colophon is unusual—the one that's meant—in Britain.

annc
08-04-2007, 05:32 PM
Isn't 'your' edition the UK edition? (Or, rather, aren't they?) That's the way the publishers usually work. And I think a colophon is unusual—the one that's meant—in Britain.For Harry Potter, that is correct. But our market was opened up some years ago, thank goodness, and we now get North American editions of some titles.

When I heard from our supplier that they would have the Harry Potters in time to catalogue and process them for us by the release date, it occurred to me that we could be getting the North American edition, which is why I looked for the colophon.

Michael Rowley
08-05-2007, 05:14 AM
Ann:

we now get North American editions of some titles

I read, not very long ago (in The Author, I think), that publishers are no longer dividing book rights into Britain & the former British Empire and North America, but they are splitting the world up into much smaller markets for books in English. Of course, the Potter books now are a special case: any part of the market is worth considering, even if 'only' half a million copies are sold there.

terrie
08-05-2007, 01:59 PM
Brad: Ugh: That colophon is the single most annoying page to typeset in all the books. Trying to get the diamond shape to look right in that point size, leading, and page size is a pain in the butt.LOL!!! I have wondered about that...'-}}

I really enjoyed this one and I didn't know they had a deluxe edition...I wasn't going to buy a copy as I figured I could borrow it from someone but I was in Costco that saturday and there was a huge stack of them and I'd had a trying morning so I bought a copy for myself--my truck's battery was dead, had to wait over an hour for AAA and then they said the battery was too dead to jump so I had to buy a new battery and fortunately they had one for my truck in their serivce truck...

Are you sad to be done with the books?

Terrie

BradW
08-05-2007, 03:08 PM
Are you sad to be done with the books?

Terrie

Well, I finished the job about three months ago, so if I was, I'm over it. I'm certainly sad to be done *reading* the books, tho.

Last night I watched the Dateline NBC from last Sunday that had an hour-long interview with Jo Rowling. While the interview was great, I have to admit enjoying the graphics a lot, as they kept flipping through the book and stopping at various pages I set.

They really lingered on the serpentine shape of the dedication, something I worked on for a while.

Brad

terrie
08-06-2007, 01:23 PM
brad: I'm certainly sad to be done *reading* the books, tho.Me too...


>>While the interview was great, I have to admit enjoying the graphics a lot, as they kept flipping through the book and stopping at various pages I set.

That must have been cool to see your work on TV...


>>They really lingered on the serpentine shape of the dedication, something I worked on for a while.

It's really quite beautifully done...

Terrie

ElyseC
08-10-2007, 03:50 PM
Ah, sorry to get that wrong about which book you started with.

Sorry for the delay in replying. We were traveling. Tis that time of year here. :)

So I'm hoping you have one or two interesting production notes to share. Or by this last book was it all down to a science?

BradW
08-12-2007, 07:24 AM
Actually, with this book I had to start over from scratch. We switched the production to InDesign, so I rebuilt the template and style sheets and produced sample pages utilizing various H&J settings that the art director had to choose between. (He didn't pick my first choice, which I quickly learned was wise for this type of work.)

All my old translation tables had been written in Torquemada but because they set me up on an Intel Mac I needed to recreate them, this time writing a PERL script. It was mostly simple search and replaces, but I had some use for character masks and if-then statements.

While doing the castoff I kept a record (on a PostIt) of which letters were used as the first character of each chapter so that I could make sure my script would take care of the necessary kerning around the drop caps.

Brad

ElyseC
08-12-2007, 12:41 PM
Actually, with this book I had to start over from scratch. We switched the production to InDesign, so I rebuilt the template and style sheets and produced sample pages utilizing various H&J settings that the art director had to choose between. (He didn't pick my first choice, which I quickly learned was wise for this type of work.)Wait...was it your first choice or the fact that he didn't pick it that was wise?

PERL, huh? Better you than me! ;)

Any other unusual or otherwise interesting production tidbits?

Franca
08-12-2007, 11:51 PM
Missed this message somehow ... Yes! The deluxe edition is quite lovely. And when I found my first copy suffered from the missing pages phenomenon I debated whether or not to get another deluxe edition to replace it ... and in the end I did, for a decent price on eBay. So now I have two - one with the binding error and one without. Just finished reading yesterday and am very sorry the saga is over!

ElyseC
08-15-2007, 06:41 PM
Missed this message somehow ... Yes! The deluxe edition is quite lovely. And when I found my first copy suffered from the missing pages phenomenon I debated whether or not to get another deluxe edition to replace it ... and in the end I did, for a decent price on eBay. So now I have two - one with the binding error and one without. Just finished reading yesterday and am very sorry the saga is over!But you notice there was a little crack left open, just in case...

Franca
08-15-2007, 08:46 PM
Well, there is almost always a way to continue a saga if one really wants to.... ;)

BradW
08-17-2007, 08:09 AM
My first choices for H&J settings were what I used on books with large paragraphs (college textbooks, encyclopedias). On the smaller paragraphs of this book those settings would have been too severe.

My PERL scripting sounds fancier than it was. Ben Ko gave me the shell of a script (the start and end) and I've cobbled together some literal-character and character mask translations (using GREP) in the script. I continued to use XPress Tags coding, importing the files with Xtags for InDesign.

Unless you have specific production questions, you'll have to wait until I write my article on this subject for the next InDesign Magazine. At the moment I'm in writer's denial: I only want to think about it peripherally until it bursts out of me one day in the form of a finished article!

Brad

ElyseC
08-17-2007, 11:12 AM
Yeah, I remember writer's denial all too well!

I read it so fast that I'm not remembering right now, but were there any special challenges like when you set the OWL exam results?

I don't recall any special art like written signatures in this one.

BradW
08-19-2007, 06:24 AM
Then you definitely read too fast. Off the top of my head, I can think of:

—James and Lily Potter's headstones (which were not intended to be side-by-side, but I thought they looked better that way);

—the handwritten notes of encouragement to Harry on the monument in Godric's Hollow;

—Arthur Weasley's file at the Ministry of Magic (in which Harry finds himself designated "Undesirable No. 1"); and,

—Lily's signature on her note to Snape.

BTW, did you recognize Mafalda Hopkirk's name from a previous book?

Brad

ElyseC
08-19-2007, 04:00 PM
Then you definitely read too fast. Off the top of my head, I can think of:

—James and Lily Potter's headstones (which were not intended to be side-by-side, but I thought they looked better that way);Oh, um, well, duh. Yes, now of course I do remember. I guess Molly's and Percy's letters several books ago and multiple ones of Dumbledore throughout that stuck in my mind strongest. Oh, and Hagrid's with tear splotches.

Absolutely the two headstones' text needed to be side by side. It would be bizarre to see them set otherwise!

—the handwritten notes of encouragement to Harry on the monument in Godric's Hollow;OK, you just got me totally sidetracked searching through all my handwriting fonts to find those three only to find that, whatever they are, I don't have them. What are they??

—Arthur Weasley's file at the Ministry of Magic (in which Harry finds himself designated "Undesirable No. 1"); and,So that formatting decision was given to you, too?

—Lily's signature on her note to Snape.OK, who did that one? Do you know?

BTW, did you recognize Mafalda Hopkirk's name from a previous book?I did, but can't remember which book or what the previous mention was about. A little hint or the answer, pretty please?

BradW
08-24-2007, 01:00 PM
Sorry to take so long to reply. I wanted to look something up and that took longer than I expected.

I don't remember which handwriting fonts we used for the monument at Godric's Hollow. I imagine sometime down the road I'll be able to get that info and I'll try to get back to you.

There wasn't anything all that challenging about Arthur Weasley's file, but as I recall I took a stab at it and the art director suggested some tweaks. If I'm not mistaken, the fact that it was bound to break across (or between) spreads influenced the design somewhat.

Yes, I know who signed Lily's name. No, I can't tell you.

Mafalda Hopkirk's signature was on the letter that Harry received after using his powers outside of Hogwarts; I believe that was in Chamber of Secrets. And I can't tell you who signed for her, either. ;-)

Brad

ElyseC
08-24-2007, 07:04 PM
Yes, I know who signed Lily's name. No, I can't tell you.

Mafalda Hopkirk's signature was on the letter that Harry received after using his powers outside of Hogwarts; I believe that was in Chamber of Secrets. And I can't tell you who signed for her, either. ;-)Party pooper Percy! Well, neither Mafalda's nor Lily's look like your handwriting, so that eliminates you. ;)

Cpatchy
09-05-2007, 06:59 AM
Because I've only learned typesetting in the past seven months, I've never paid attention to who typeset the HPs before. Now, like a true nerd, I was excited to find the typesetter's name after finishing the Deathly Hallows, and even more excited to find this forum.

What I'd like to know, Brad, and my apologies if these questions have already been asked, did you log your hours on how long HP7, and any of the others, took you to typeset? Or at least do you have a rough estimation?

And how did you end up getting the job? Did they no longer like the typesetter for the first few books?

Did I understand correctly that you don't get your comp copies before the release date? So you had to order one from Amazon to get it on the 21st? That seems odd to me. I work for only a small publishing company, but with the few books I've done I've always gotten my comp copies at least a couple weeks before it's released. Please explain :)

ktinkel
09-05-2007, 08:04 AM
Hi, Cpatchy — welcome to the forum.

This is a great place to discuss type and typography (if we do say so ourselves). :)

Michael Rowley
09-05-2007, 08:59 AM
Did they no longer like the typesetter for the first few books?

A lot of the sort of novels I read that are written in the USA are reprinted in England unchanged. The sort of resettimg that Brad undertook would be justified only if the sales warranted the expense, and it may not have been clear that the earliest books by Ms Rawling would ever become so popular.

Cpatchy
09-06-2007, 07:44 AM
Thank you! I'm glad to be here.

BradW
09-06-2007, 11:33 AM
In any given "HP year" (as I tend to call them) I can be reminded of the number of days I spent working on the job by reviewing my (really expensive) parking receipts from a certain garage in Soho. With the latest book, I also spent some time at home working on a new translation table and developing the template for the move over to InDesign.

Although I'm not willing to state how many hours/days I worked on this or any of the other HP books, I can say that I work very fast and that using a couple of third-party Word utilities and InDesign plug-ins, in addition to a well-written and -maintained translation table, allowed me to avoid a lot of tedious (and slow) manual formatting.

The U.S. versions of the first three books came out after they were published in the U.K. With the fourth book (known to the world as "the fourth book" until a week before it came out), Scholastic and Bloomesbury agreed to publish simultaneously. To meet the very strict (and tight) schedule and to minimize the number of folks handling the manuscript, they approached me to do it. (They already knew me from work I did for their reference division over the years.)

No one gets comp copies of HP books before the pub date. As I recall, this time I received my comps of both the regular and deluxe editions the following week. But I knew I'd end up buying one for my Mom, so I've just gotten into the habit of reading the one I bought, sending her the comp of the regular edition, and showing off the deluxe one every change I get. ;-)

Brad

Michael Rowley
09-06-2007, 12:27 PM
Brad:

Scholastic and Bloomsbury agreed to publish simultaneouslyHave you any idea of the typeface for the UK edition? I'm not at all able to recognize faces at a glance, but it could have been Minion.

There is no UK luxury edition, of course, and the 'children's edition' and 'adults' edition' differ only in the cover.

BradW
09-06-2007, 03:19 PM
I'd heard about the different covers. I'm afraid I've never looked inside the U.K. edition; by the time I came on-board, my references were the first three U.S. versions.

Brad

John Barber
09-17-2007, 09:25 PM
BradW
I don't remember which handwriting fonts we used for the monument at Godric's Hollow. I imagine sometime down the road I'll be able to get that info and I'll try to get back to you.This is my first post here and the reason I signed up so please be kind.

Quite a few people including myself and I think, ElyseC have a great interest in the "inside" story of the Harry Potter books and particularly the fonts, layout and graphics used and how they were chosen.
I have managed to track down some of these fonts and would hope that BradW could fill in the gaps that are left. (or wait for the book?)
Here is the list so far:-

HP 7 Chapter 16 Page 328
"The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death"
Centaur MT Swash Capitals

HP 7 Chapter 17 Page 333
"Good luck, Harry, wherever you are."
Unknown at this time.
"If you read this, Harry, we're all behind you!"
Zemke Hand ITC
"Long live Harry Potter."
Wordy Diva-Regular

HP 7 Chapter 20 Page 398
"THE QUIBBLER. EDITOR: X. LOVEGOOD
PICK YOUR OWN MISTLETOE
KEEP OFF THE DIRIGIBLE PLUMS"
Unknown at this time.

So that's 3 out of the 5 new fonts in The Deathly Hallows.

Just a personal opinion but I particularly like the Swash Capitals, a lovely contrast to the plain text side by side headstone titles, joins the Potters together.
Also the Unknown 1st graffiti messages H, is unusual with a left extended bar and upward angle. Rather swish.

Comments and especially more information please.

John.

terrie
09-18-2007, 01:17 PM
Hi John...welcome to the forum...thanks for that info...very interesting...

Terrie

BradW
09-30-2007, 04:49 PM
I will try to post the info on the fonts once I have access to it. Can't say when that will be, tho!

Brad

John Barber
10-13-2007, 01:38 AM
I will try to post the info on the fonts once I have access to it. Can't say when that will be, tho!

Brad

When you are ready and have time now your InDesign Magazine #20 (http://www.indesignmag.com/backissues.php) article has been published.
In the meantime the font everyone has been trying to identify for 2 years, Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix, Chapter 12 Page 222 GALLONS OF GALLEONS now identified by fontologist as Cathodelic.

Getting back to the Deathly Hallows, I have some more identified (I think). Only 2 left to ID.
Here is the current list:-

1) HP7 Chapter 2 Page 16
"by Elphias Doge"
Franklin Gothic (ITC) Std-Book

2) HP7 Chapter 11 Page 217
"by Rita Skeeter"
Franklin Gothic (ITC) Std-Book

3) HP7 Chapter 11 Page 249
"MUDBLOODS
and the Dangers They Pose to
a Peaceful Pure-Blood Society"
University Roman LET Plain

4) HP7 Chapter 16 Page 325
"Where your treasure is, there will your heart be also."
Unknown at this time but very similar to Centaur MT Swash Capitals
Elements of P22 Avocet Light Regular, Jenson Classico Italic, Augusta Cancellaresca
See here for image:-
http://www.geocities.com/tatesha/HarryPotterAF.html

5) HP 7 Chapter 16 Page 328
"The last enemy that shall be destroyed is death."
Centaur MT Swash Capitals

6) HP7 Chapter 17 Page 332
"On this spot, on the night of 31 October 1981, ...."
Optima LT Std

7) HP 7 Chapter 17 Page 333
First line of graffiti
"Good luck, Harry, wherever you are."
FultonsHand-Regular (or Dakota Regular)

8) HP 7 Chapter 17 Page 333
Second line of graffiti
"If you read this, Harry, we're all behind you!"
Zemke Hand ITC

9) HP 7 Chapter 17 Page 333
Third line of graffiti
"Long live Harry Potter."
Wordy Diva-Regular

10) HP 7 Chapter 18 Page 353
"Albus Dumbledore, shortly after his mother's death,
with his friend Gellert Grindelwald"
Franklin Gothic (ITC) LT Com Book Condensed

11) HP 7 Chapter 20 Page 398
"THE QUIBBLER. EDITOR: X. LOVEGOOD
PICK YOUR OWN MISTLETOE
KEEP OFF THE DIRIGIBLE PLUMS"
Unknown at this time
See here for image:-
http://www.geocities.com/tatesha/HarryPotterAF.html

12) HP 7 Chapter 24 Page 481
"HERE LIES DOBBY, A FREE ELF."
Herculanum

I'm hoping I have guessed right with Franklin Gothic (ITC) Std-Book and Optima LT Std as Arial style fonts are hard to tell apart.

------------------------------------------------------
(New addition, put it here just to keep everything together.)

ERROR LIST HP7 (Subject to Change)

Ch7 P116
(indent? doesn't read correctly to me. ___ represents indent)
___"Ron!" Hermione was just behind him, slightly out of breath.
___There was a strained silence, then Ginny said in a flat little voice,
"Well, happy birthday anyway, Harry."

CH22 P428
(space missing before 'said')
___"Why not?" said Harry ...........

-----------------------------------------------------

John Barber.