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ElyseC
07-05-2007, 10:39 AM
..."Podunk, IA" as examples.Watch it there, bud! ;)

Steve Rindsberg
07-05-2007, 06:21 PM
Quite right. Bad geography. Bad. Send it to sit in the corner.

There's a Podunk in Connecticut, another in Vermont, New York, Michigan, and even in Belarus, but sorry. None in Iowa.

ElyseC
07-06-2007, 08:13 AM
There's a Podunk in Connecticut, another in Vermont, New York, Michigan, and even in Belarus, but sorry. None in Iowa.And presumably none in Ohio. :)

Steve Rindsberg
07-06-2007, 08:19 PM
And presumably none in Ohio. :)
Nary a one. But you have to wonder what got between the ears of some of the folks that name these places.

Upper Sandusky, which is a good 50 miles *south* of Sandusky.
Big Island, which is nowhere near any detectable water.

ElyseC
07-07-2007, 05:28 AM
Nary a one. But you have to wonder what got between the ears of some of the folks that name these places.Yes, there must be a decent story about them somewhere.

About half an hour from here is Coralville. This is the middle of the continent, but someone named it Coralville. Had me scratching my head for decades until a couple of years back I read the reason why. Here is Wikipedia's entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coralville,_Iowa) for Coralville.

iamback
07-07-2007, 09:02 AM
Upper Sandusky, which is a good 50 miles *south* of Sandusky.Well, in many languages and place names, "upper" can indicate both "northern" and "higher" (on higher ground). And then there's the even more mysterious difference between "uptown" and "downtown". :twisted:

iamback
07-07-2007, 09:07 AM
About half an hour from here is Coralville. This is the middle of the continent, but someone named it Coralville. Had me scratching my head for decades until a couple of years back I read the reason why.Your statement made me think immediately of Tibet, where a lot of blood coral is found locally - yes, old sea bottom, but pushed up endlessly...

Here is Wikipedia's entry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Coralville,_Iowa) for Coralville.Ha! So I guessed right immediately:The city's name came from the coral samples that were found in limestone

Geology is fun! Stuff ends up in such unexpected places... I have a few blood coral things I brought from Tibet (a necklace and a silver ring with its "stone" made of coral) - very cheap because it's so abundant there!

Steve Rindsberg
07-07-2007, 02:06 PM
Very old coral indeed. We have lots of it hereabouts as well (also in fossil form)

Steve Rindsberg
07-07-2007, 02:11 PM
Well, in many languages and place names, "upper" can indicate both "northern" and "higher" (on higher ground). And then there's the even more mysterious difference between "uptown" and "downtown". :twisted:
True, but usually you'd expect the "higher ground" upper-named place to be within a reasonable distance of the "lower" one. Close enough for there to be some reason for naming them relative to one another, so to speak.

These are just short of 100km apart.

Don't get me started on uptown. Some collection of harmless lunatics has decided that the area where I live is now Uptown. True, it's at a higher altitude than the downtown area, but so are all the nearby neighborhoods. There are hills in practically all directions from downtown. Why us?

Don't try to answer that. It takes a harmless lunatic to understand these things. I don't want you to hurt yourself. ;-)

annc
07-07-2007, 05:32 PM
Upper Sandusky, which is a good 50 miles *south* of Sandusky. So why does 'Upper' have to be north? Here it usually relates to the upper reaches of a river or creek, so we have Upper Caboolture south-west of Caboolture, but in the upper reaches of the Caboolture River.

ElyseC
07-07-2007, 07:29 PM
Very old coral indeed. We have lots of it hereabouts as well (also in fossil form)Truly amazing to think that we're living on ancient ocean floor. Puts to shame those Egyptian mummies we saw last month at the Field Museum in Chicago. Being able to look upon a face that once felt the winds and sands along the Nile, and walked among the pyramids when they were shiny and new is still pretty amazing, but all that happened barely a blink ago compared to when that coral was alive.

Mind boggling.

ElyseC
07-07-2007, 07:38 PM
Heh! When I was a kid I thought it was so named, because so many buildings and signs were painted a pale coral color. But that was the reasoning of a child surrounded by left over (and fading) color schemes of the 1950s, probably especially popular because of the city name.

Interestingly (to me who knew it then and now), Coralville used to be a little nothing place, kind of the homely, ungraceful sibling of shining star Iowa City. Sometime after 1978, however, something changed in a big way and now it's the tony place to live, the high rent district, very popular with the doctors and professors of University of Iowa.

iamback
07-08-2007, 12:23 AM
Aha, a very good case for "upper" being a good distance away from un-qualified or "lower" ... rivers can be quite a bit longer than 100Km!

Steve Rindsberg
07-08-2007, 08:37 AM
Yes, but you're upside down. ;-)

And I had to rule out upper reaches of a river/creek because there seems to be none (though it's possible, just barely, that some tiny little creek that eventually becomes the Sandusky River is involved.)