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Franca
03-05-2005, 08:59 PM
I have been watching BBC America's Mystery Monday programming lately and have been quite entertained by a number of mystery series I've not seen before - Murphy's Law, The Night Detective, and ... I've forgotten the name of the one with the two women detectives .... (Aargh ... it will wake me up in the middle of the night.) The most recent arrival on the scene, The Night Detective, is my current favorite. I've only seen a couple of episodes but so far the stories, characters, and acting have been quite good, striking just the right balance between humor and gravity. And, much as I love the typical PBS mystery fare, these have been a refreshing departure from clever upper class whodunits set in the increasingly distant past.

ktinkel
03-06-2005, 06:22 AM
I have been watching BBC America's Mystery Monday programming lately and have been quite entertained by a number of mystery series I've not seen before - Murphy's Law, The Night Detective, and ... I've forgotten the name of the one with the two women detectives .... (Aargh ... it will wake me up in the middle of the night.) The most recent arrival on the scene, The Night Detective, is my current favorite. I've only seen a couple of episodes but so far the stories, characters, and acting have been quite good, striking just the right balance between humor and gravity. And, much as I love the typical PBS mystery fare, these have been a refreshing departure from clever upper class whodunits set in the increasingly distant past.Have to figure out where we can see BBC America (or whether, since I haven’t looked).

I did enjoy the PBS series about WWII, with the wry sandy-haired guy and his female driver. But it would be on for a while, then off — hard to remember to catch it. PBS here spends so much time fund-raising that it is hard to develop any pattern of viewing.

Richard Hunt
03-06-2005, 12:38 PM
Have to figure out where we can see BBC America (or whether, since I haven’t looked).

I did enjoy the PBS series about WWII, with the wry sandy-haired guy and his female driver. But it would be on for a while, then off — hard to remember to catch it. PBS here spends so much time fund-raising that it is hard to develop any pattern of viewing.

From http://www.bbcamerica.com/about/about.jsp#howget

"BBC AMERICA is available on digital cable systems throughout the U.S. and via satellite on DIRECTV (1-800-531-5000 or www.directv.com) and Echostar's DISH Network (1-800-333-3474 or www.dishnetwork.com).
If BBC AMERICA is not available in your area, please contact your local service provider and request the channel. Our experience shows that the more operators hear from their customers, the more likely they are to add the channel to their system." I have no idea what it costs though.


Interestingly the series you mentioned, Foyle's War, is shown on ITV (national commercial network) and therefore regularly interrupted by commercials... grrr... The girl who play's Foyle's driver - Honeysuckle Weeks - really is a product of a top private girls school (Roedean) and Oxford University.

Richard Hunt, Cultural Ambassador

ktinkel
03-06-2005, 01:34 PM
… BBC AMERICA is available on digital cable systems throughout the U.S.Thanks for the link. Does not appear to be available on my digital cable system, alas. Think I’ll call tomorrow and ask for it. That should be fun (not my favorite company, Cablevision!).

Interestingly the series you mentioned, Foyle's War, is shown on ITV (national commercial network) and therefore regularly interrupted by commercials... grrr... There was a note on the BBC America site that their shows carry advertising in the U.S. as well. If that is any consolation for you.

Here, commercial TV programs seem to have 20 minutes of ads an hour (not sure I am even exaggerating).

PeterArnel
03-06-2005, 02:18 PM
I have been watching BBC America's Mystery Monday programming lately and have been quite entertained by a number of mystery series I've not seen before - Murphy's Law, The Night Detective, and ... I've forgotten the name of the one with the two women detectives .... (Aargh ... it will wake me up in the middle of the night.) The most recent arrival on the scene, The Night Detective, is my current favorite. I've only seen a couple of episodes but so far the stories, characters, and acting have been quite good, striking just the right balance between humor and gravity. And, much as I love the typical PBS mystery fare, these have been a refreshing departure from clever upper class whodunits set in the increasingly distant past.

Being Britsh thats fantastic (never seen them here :-) were the ladies Rosemary and THyme - My favorits here are MORSE , POIROT , Jonathon Creek, and Cadfael if u can watch out for them
Peter

ElyseC
03-06-2005, 02:21 PM
Thanks for the link. Does not appear to be available on my digital cable system, alas. Think I’ll call tomorrow and ask for it. That should be fun (not my favorite company, Cablevision!).Might want to look into DishNetwork. We've been happy satellite customers of theirs for 9-10 years. On the "Dish 500" package you get BBC America and lots more, and we don't get a single for-extra-charge movie channel package and still have access to more good movies than we can possibly find time to watch.

BigJohnD
03-06-2005, 02:34 PM
Murphy's Law with James Nesbitt. http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/drama/murphyslaw/

The Night Detective I think that's called "55 Degrees North" here as it's based in Newcastle 'pon Tyne. http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/crime/55degrees/

I've forgotten the name of the one with the two women detectives "Rosemary and Thyme"? http://www.rosemaryandthyme.tv/main.asp
"Murder in Suburbia" with Ash and Scribbs? I thought that had sunk without trace. http://www.offthetelly.co.uk/reviews/2004/murderinsuburbia.htm

annc
03-06-2005, 03:13 PM
Murphy's Law with James Nesbitt. http://www.bbc.co.uk/northernireland/drama/murphyslaw/

I think that's called "55 Degrees North" here as it's based in Newcastle 'pon Tyne. http://www.bbc.co.uk/drama/crime/55degrees/

"Rosemary and Thyme"? http://www.rosemaryandthyme.tv/main.asp
"Murder in Suburbia" with Ash and Scribbs? I thought that had sunk without trace. http://www.offthetelly.co.uk/reviews/2004/murderinsuburbia.htmRosemary and Thyme started here about six weeks ago, but it's on a commercial station and I keep forgetting to watch it. Felicity Kendal has been a favourite of mine since The Good Life.

Franca
03-06-2005, 07:09 PM
Murder in Suburbia - that was it. Have not seen Rosemary and Thyme.

Interesting that they changed the name of The Night Detective for us ... although I find it a good title for the series given the manner in which the phrase is used in the episodes I have seen. The poor fellow is always being mistaken for a suspect. "That's not a black man, that's the night detective".

A&E (Arts and Entertainment channel) is running MI-5, which also underwent a name change for the American market. I believe it's called Spooks in the U.K. The series is unique here in that there are no opening (or closing) credits. I've been wondering if that is also the case across the Pond? Are the actors, producers, directors completely uncredited there as well? MI-5 reminds me a bit of the old series, The Sandbaggers, which I adored (The final episode just about broke my heart). Featured a much younger Roy Marsden who reappeared years later as Adam Dalgliesh in the P.D. James mysteries.

Franca
03-06-2005, 07:14 PM
I second the DishNetwork recommendation. We dumped cable a few years ago and never looked back. Satellite (for TV) is infinitely better! We chose it over DirecTV on account of the programming, and AFAIK it is still the better choice, at least for the types of shows we watch.

Franca
03-06-2005, 07:22 PM
My favorits here are MORSE , POIROT , Jonathon Creek, and Cadfael if u can watch out for themHave somehow missed Cadfael every time it has run here, but love Morse, and both Poirot and Miss Marple. Somehow they managed to find the quintessential Poirot and Miss Marple in David Suchet and Joan Hickson. Morse is still one of my favorites; I was so sorry to hear of John Thaw's passing. Also enjoy Jonathan Creek though not as much as Morse. :-) Really there have been too many wonderful British TV imports to list! If I get started I will surely leave out a favorite by mistake.

Shane Stanley
03-06-2005, 10:09 PM
I did enjoy the PBS series about WWII, with the wry sandy-haired guy and his female driver. But it would be on for a while, then off — hard to remember to catch it.

Because they're movie length, I think they only make something like four shows to a series, hence the disjointedness. The last of our current series was shown here the week before last, mercifully without ads.

Now we're getting a new Miss Marple, but I fear Joan Hickson will be a hard act to follow.

On a totally different theme, keep an eye out for 'Trevor's World of Sport'. Very funny.

Shane

marlene
03-06-2005, 10:12 PM
I've been addicted to the BBC America's Mystery Monday for quite a while. Mr. E has resigned himself to the fact that I have control of the remote on Monday nights. <g>

I really liked Waking the Dead, although I was really appalled when they killed off Mel.

I also really liked The Vice and McCallum.

If I didn't watch these shows, I wouldn't know what "the filth" meant, or other intriguing UK slang. <g>

mxh

Franca
03-07-2005, 01:05 AM
Oh, yes, forgot about McCallum. Liked him, too. Another "flawed hero". Somehow I missed Waking the Dead and The Vice. My other half has been enjoying Mystery Monday with me of late. I tend to preview the offerings first, recording the ones I think he might like - and it seems I've been doing a good job recently. ;-)

(I always have control of the remote. <BG> I didn't seize it; it was voluntarily given over to me long ago.)

Richard Hunt
03-07-2005, 01:18 AM
There was a note on the BBC America site that their shows carry advertising in the U.S. as well. If that is any consolation for you.

Here, commercial TV programs seem to have 20 minutes of ads an hour (not sure I am even exaggerating).

Watching some programming, it is quite obvious that they have been written and edited with advertising breaks in mind.

The amount of advertising is in theory regulated but the regulatory body seems pretty toothless - it seems to be between 12 and 17 minutes an hour.

No cable here. In the UK, that's limited to some areas of bigger cities. The cables must be buried, not just strung along the utility poles, and so the investment is too high. Satellite TV - and radio - is very popular.

Richard Hunt

Richard Hunt
03-07-2005, 01:32 AM
Interesting that they changed the name of The Night Detective for us ... although I find it a good title for the series given the manner in which the phrase is used in the episodes I have seen. The poor fellow is always being mistaken for a suspect. "That's not a black man, that's the night detective".

A&E (Arts and Entertainment channel) is running MI-5, which also underwent a name change for the American market. I believe it's called Spooks in the U.K. The series is unique here in that there are no opening (or closing) credits. I've been wondering if that is also the case across the Pond? Are the actors, producers, directors completely uncredited there as well?

If they had called it 55 degrrees north in the US, it might have been mistaken for a series about Canadian wildlife <g>.

A&E put up a lot of the money for Spooks, and there aren't conentional titles here either.

Richard

Franca
03-07-2005, 02:12 AM
If they had called it 55 degrrees north in the US, it might have been mistaken for a series about Canadian wildlife <g>.You're probably right there!

A&E put up a lot of the money for Spooks, and there aren't conventional titles here either.Didn't realize that A&E contributed funds; they are, of course uncredited. ;-) I guess the lack of credits is appropriate - the anonymity of the spies must be preserved! (I have recognized a few of the actors, however.) In any case, all of the unnamed spooks involved did a great job. My husband and I haven't missed an episode.

PeterArnel
03-07-2005, 01:10 PM
Have somehow missed Cadfael every time it has run here, but love Morse, and both Poirot and Miss Marple. Somehow they managed to find the quintessential Poirot and Miss Marple in David Suchet and Joan Hickson. Morse is still one of my favorites; I was so sorry to hear of John Thaw's passing. Also enjoy Jonathan Creek though not as much as Morse. :-) Really there have been too many wonderful British TV imports to list! If I get started I will surely leave out a favorite by mistake.
Cadfael is really good he is a Monk played by Derek Jakobi (one of the great British actors ( in Judi Dentch mould) in the period of Maude and Stephen ( about 8 century ) and it has the same style as Morse and Poirot - try and watch just one and I am sure u will be hooked
Peter
We still get Quyincy here

ktinkel
03-07-2005, 01:25 PM
… played by Derek Jakobi (one of the great British actors) …Isn’t he, though! Did you watch “I, Claudius” a decade or two ago? He was brilliant in that.

We see Judi Dench here mostly in an aging English sitcom series: “As Time Goes By.” I could probably take pleasure in having her read the phone book, so I often watch, but we have by now seen every episode at least twice. Geoffrey Palmer is also in that, and he is also very good.

ElyseC
03-07-2005, 02:21 PM
I second the DishNetwork recommendation. We dumped cable a few years ago and never looked back. Satellite (for TV) is infinitely better! We chose it over DirecTV on account of the programming, and AFAIK it is still the better choice, at least for the types of shows we watch.Yes, I have friends and family with DirecTV and am often disappointed when I call them with "Turn on the _____ channel! There's a great show about ______ on right now!" and they don't get that channel at all. Every time it has been a channel that, for us on DN, has been a regular one we've had for ages, nothing exotic yet our family/friends would have to call in to ask their provider to offer, then sit and hope enough others have requested it, too.

Michael Rowley
03-07-2005, 02:23 PM
Peter:

'about 8 century'

Ahem! You're about 400 years out.

BigJohnD
03-07-2005, 02:26 PM
Morse! Now yer talking. Best plod series ever. In fact it's on it's zillionth repeat on ITV3 right now - "Second Time Around".

http://www.radiotimes.com/ListingsServlet?event=10&channelId=1859&programmeId=25916724&jspLocation=/jsp/prog_details.jsp

Not sure if that link will work…

Franca
03-07-2005, 02:28 PM
Indeed. And I've just heard that DirecTV is dropping a channel that a lot of horse folks watch -- RFD-TV. I think they're going to get a lot of phone calls.... DishNetwork has added a bunch of programming since we signed on. The monthly fee has gone up a bit along with, but so far it's been worth it.

Franca
03-07-2005, 02:43 PM
I'm sure Cadfael will be back around again here and now that I can record more easily I will be sure not to miss it this time. Derek Jacobi has always been excellent whenever I've seen him.

No kidding - you get Quincy, M.D., as in Jack Klugman?? I think I've seen every episode a few times over by now. Not sure if any station is running that at the moment but it always comes back as well. The show is pretty dated now, and it suffered a bit from "recurring plot"* syndrome with other prime time network TV detective shows, but I enjoyed it. I was always sorry I didn't see more of Jack Klugman as an actor. In his younger days he was in one of my all-time favorite films, Twelve Angry Men.

*recurring plot syndrome ... for example, nearly every detective show on TV here has had an episode tracing the path of death and destruction of a single handgun, fired, tossed and picked up by a string of different people. At least one episode of Columbo was a remake of one of the the very first in the Columbo series. There are many such recycled plots in American television, and not just in detective series, either. There have been a bunch of plots recycled from The Waltons into other subsequent family TV shows. Only the characters changed. ;-)

Franca
03-07-2005, 02:47 PM
Morse! Now yer talking. Best plod series ever. In fact it's on it's zillionth repeat on ITV3 right now - "Second Time Around".

http://www.radiotimes.com/ListingsServlet?event=10&channelId=1859&programmeId=25916724&jspLocation=/jsp/prog_details.jsp

Not sure if that link will work…I haven't decided if it's the best, but certainly one of the best. I love how the relationship between Morse and Lewis evolved over the years. And I sure did lust after that beautiful red Jag - pained me greatly every time it was dinged up or vandalized.

BigJohnD
03-07-2005, 03:05 PM
I haven't decided if it's the best, but certainly one of the best. I love how the relationship between Morse and Lewis evolved over the years. And I sure did lust after that beautiful red Jag - pained me greatly every time it was dinged up or vandalized.
Well, if you're an unattached educated male of a certain age, like MkII Jags, real ale, opera, crosswords and prefer the cerebral route to catching murderers in Oxfordshire, then it's unbeatable.

BTW, your round, Lewis! I need beer to feed my brain.


http://www.morsemania.co.uk/images/0346.jpg


One of Morse's favourite boozers.

Franca
03-07-2005, 03:27 PM
Well, if you're an unattached educated male of a certain age, like MkII Jags, real ale, opera, crosswords and prefer the cerebral route to catching murderers in Oxfordshire, then it's unbeatable.

BTW, your round, Lewis! I need beer to feed my brain.Apart from the "male" bit I'm most of the above. ;-) Wouldn't mind popping into that lovely pub right about now. I'm afraid I'm a half-pinter, though. Tsk, tsk - shameful, I know.

ElyseC
03-07-2005, 05:08 PM
Indeed. And I've just heard that DirecTV is dropping a channel that a lot of horse folks watch -- RFD-TV. I think they're going to get a lot of phone calls.... DishNetwork has added a bunch of programming since we signed on. The monthly fee has gone up a bit along with, but so far it's been worth it.I'm amazed at how often we stumble on newly added channels. We've seen very few rate increases and they've been (to us) pretty inconsequential. Whenever we discover new channels I check the bill to see if they've increased the charges, but 9 times of 10 they haven't. Very cool.

That RFD channel is one we stumbled on. Haven't watched it for more than a couple of minutes total, but I can understand how useful it is to its viewers.

annc
03-07-2005, 05:43 PM
Isn’t he, though! Did you watch “I, Claudius” a decade or two ago? He was brilliant in that.

We see Judi Dench here mostly in an aging English sitcom series: “As Time Goes By.” I could probably take pleasure in having her read the phone book, so I often watch, but we have by now seen every episode at least twice. Geoffrey Palmer is also in that, and he is also very good.Judi Dench is wonderful. Remember the series where she had a love affair with her husband as the love interest? He was a market gardeneer in the show, but I can't forget the name of it.

And did you see Butterflies with Geoffrey Palmer and Wendy Craig? A great show.

ktinkel
03-07-2005, 05:44 PM
Might want to look into DishNetwork. We've been happy satellite customers of theirs for 9-10 years. On the "Dish 500" package you get BBC America and lots more, and we don't get a single for-extra-charge movie channel package and still have access to more good movies than we can possibly find time to watch.Around here all I here are complaints about DishNetwork. In fact, there is a Dish thingie here on our property, but our neighbors have all gone back to pathetic, annoying Cablevision.

It may have to do with the terrain.

ktinkel
03-07-2005, 05:47 PM
Judi Dench is wonderful. Remember the series where she had a love affair with her husband as the love interest? He was a market gardeneer in the show, but I can't forget the name of it.

And did you see Butterflies with Geoffrey Palmer and Wendy Craig? A great show.I have read about her series with her (late?) husband, but never seen it. Nor the Geoffrey Palmer show.

We are obviously deprived here!

ElyseC
03-07-2005, 07:30 PM
Around here all I here are complaints about DishNetwork. In fact, there is a Dish thingie here on our property, but our neighbors have all gone back to pathetic, annoying Cablevision.

It may have to do with the terrain.How strange! Yes, maybe the terrain doesn't allow the dish to squirt its birds above very well.

Echostar keeps putting up more satellites, so you might check to see if the local complaints are current. With new birds above, perhaps it's easier to get a good signal than it once was.

Here DishNetwork is the overwhelming favorite and any satellite service is far far better than any of the cable companies. My sis has cable, though, because they watch TV only for the news morning and night, and she loves her broadband package they get bundled with the basic cable TV.

annc
03-07-2005, 07:42 PM
I have read about her series with her (late?) husband, but never seen it. Nor the Geoffrey Palmer show.

We are obviously deprived here!You must be! Butterflies was the first series I saw Geoffrey Palmer in, and I thought he was wonderful.

Judi Dench's husband died a couple of years ago, I think. He was very good in that show. Wish I could remember its name.

marlene
03-07-2005, 09:52 PM
A Fine Romance.

She sang the theme song, IIRC.

mxh

marlene
03-07-2005, 09:56 PM
Traditionally, I always had control of the remote, because I paid the cable bill. <g>

Now that we have a joint checking account, the lines are blurred. There's no question that I have the last word on our viewing selections, but sometimes I let Mr. E watch what he wants while I videotape my choice (to watch later).

However, I can't tape BBC America and watch something else, because the digital channels don't let me do that. Might be something that can be got around, but we can't figure it out.

mxh

annc
03-07-2005, 10:18 PM
A Fine Romance.

She sang the theme song, IIRC.

mxhOf course! Thanks. What did you think of it?

ElyseC
03-08-2005, 09:35 AM
However, I can't tape BBC America and watch something else, because the digital channels don't let me do that. Might be something that can be got around, but we can't figure it out.To do that with our DVR satellite box we'd have to have a two-TV ("dual receiver" I think they call it?) box. We'd be able to watch one while recording on another or record two simultaneous events, because that model contains two hard disks, one for each "tuner" or receiver or whatever the term. Could hook up two TVs to it, too, of course.

We didn't spring for that model, although I now kind of wish we had. We moved the old bare bones receiver we had in CA and got the new DVR unit for a mere $5 extra a month on a DishMover special they were running at the time. Of course we had just one TV, so had to run out and buy a new TV for the old box, which we hooked up in the master bedroom. Have never had a real TV in our bedroom (an old, ugly, fuzzy B&W 12"er on rabbit ears the first few years of our marriage doesn't count), so we're living high on the hog now. <g>

BigJohnD
03-08-2005, 10:39 AM
Judi Dench's husband died a couple of years ago, I think. He was very good in that show. Wish I could remember its name.

Michael Williams in "A Fine Romance".
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/1114233.stm

Dame Judy is now M, 007's boss.

Franca
03-08-2005, 11:08 AM
However, I can't tape BBC America and watch something else, because the digital channels don't let me do that. Might be something that can be got around, but we can't figure it out.We get around that with DishNetwork by having two TVs each with a digital video receiver for those times when there are two good programs on at once. It doesn't happen that often, though, because usually at least one of the programs is shown multiple times in a week. I love it when they're rerun at some ungodly hour because I can record them and watch later at leisure.

And while it is not possible to record one live show and watch a different live show at once, it is possible to watch a saved, previously-recorded show while you are recording a new live one. We've worked out a system whereby we almost never have to see commercials. We will watch something we've previously captured while recording the new program.

I had heard about the dual-hard drive receivers Elyse mentions, which would be perfect if you've just got one TV. There might be something out there that would allow you to do the same with digital cable.

annc
03-08-2005, 11:11 AM
Michael Williams in "A Fine Romance".
http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/entertainment/1114233.stm

Dame Judy is now M, 007's boss.Goodness, it was over three years ago!

Thanks for the link, John.

JVegVT
03-08-2005, 07:24 PM
>> Have never had a real TV in our bedroom (an old, ugly, fuzzy B&W 12"er on rabbit ears the first few years of our marriage doesn't count), so we're living high on the hog now. >>

We have two TVs in our bedroom, which isn't very large. We have two so that if we're watching TV lying on our side and we want to roll over to the other side, we can continue watching.<g> They're both little 13-inch TVs, though, nothing grandiose.
--Judy M.

ktinkel
03-09-2005, 05:31 AM
We have two TVs in our bedroom, which isn't very large. We have two so that if we're watching TV lying on our side and we want to roll over to the other side, we can continue watching.We have only one TV in our bedroom, but it faces (slightly obliquely) at the wall of mirrors next to our bed. So if I roll over, I just watch the mirror image.

It is odd, though — aside from the distortion caused by the angle and people suddenly having their hair parted on the other side, the mirrors have a slight magenta tinge to them. Most of the time I find I “watch” TV mostly with my ears, so it really isn’t too peculiar.

Richard Hunt
03-09-2005, 05:45 AM
Here DishNetwork is the overwhelming favorite and any satellite service is far far better than any of the cable companies. My sis has cable, though, because they watch TV only for the news morning and night, and she loves her broadband package they get bundled with the basic cable TV.

Direct-to-home satellite reception can be temperamental at times. Sometimes channels break up in heavy rain or snow, and sometimes the dish might get out of alignment - one degree out is enough.

Richard Hunt

ktinkel
03-09-2005, 05:50 AM
Direct-to-home satellite reception can be temperamental at times. Sometimes channels break up in heavy rain or snow, and sometimes the dish might get out of alignment - one degree out is enough. Around here the complaints are usually weather-related.

I would love to dump cable — our provider must be among the worst in the nation! — but after looking into it, decided not to do it now. Things may change, of course.

Richard Hunt
03-09-2005, 06:02 AM
No kidding - you get Quincy, M.D., as in Jack Klugman??

It rolls round pretty regularly, but seems to be stuck in the 2pm slots midweek. Muder She Wrote and Columbo pop up regularly too, and I occasionally catch an episode of the Rockford Files, which has a great title tune.

Richard

ktinkel
03-09-2005, 06:08 AM
It rolls round pretty regularly, but seems to be stuck in the 2pm slots midweek. Muder She Wrote and Columbo pop up regularly too, and I occasionally catch an episode of the Rockford Files, which has a great title tune.I loved Rockford Files, and even watched it in reruns. But his cars — which were deliberately old at the time the series first aired — are now hysterically so!

Franca
03-09-2005, 11:43 AM
It rolls round pretty regularly, but seems to be stuck in the 2pm slots midweek. Muder She Wrote and Columbo pop up regularly too, and I occasionally catch an episode of the Rockford Files, which has a great title tune.I like Rockford's theme music as well. Another detective theme I liked was the one from McCloud.

BigJohnD
03-09-2005, 01:34 PM
Cable, Satellite… I'm on free digital terresterial. Excellent. http://www.zyra.org.uk/freeview.htm

marlene
03-09-2005, 01:34 PM
I saw a documentary about Morse on public television. Lots of interesting details, including the fact that the guy who did the music (Barrington Pheloung, IIRC) incorporated Morse code into the theme music. Those musical beeping sounds apparently spell out Morse in Morse code.

How cool is that?

mxh

marlene
03-09-2005, 01:37 PM
What did you think of it?

The program, or Judi Dench's singing? <g>

I liked it, but it only was broadcast locally once (that I know of), and I missed most of the episodes.

I have trouble remembering to watch programs I like. I can set reminders on my digital cable thingy, but unless I'm sitting in front of the tube when the reminder pops up, it does me no good.

mxh

marlene
03-09-2005, 01:39 PM
To do that with our DVR satellite box we'd have to have a two-TV ("dual receiver" I think they call it?) box.

Right -- now I remember -- I'd have to rent a second digital cable box and pay for the additional connection. I already spend a truly obscene amount of money on cable each month.

mxh

marlene
03-09-2005, 01:43 PM
BBC America often reruns programs I want to see at ungodly hours, but the problem is that I have to leave the TV on to record them. Including the volume -- to record the sound, it has to be on at a normal level.

Doesn't bother me, but Mr. E complains about the noise.

It's funny that he can fall asleep in the recliner in front of the TV (even while watching something noisy), but when he goes upstairs to sleep, he says the TV's on too loud ...

I bought him a white noise machine at Sharper Image (it makes all sorts of sounds -- babbling brooks, rain, taxi horns, etc.) but he says he ends up listening to the noises and can't fall asleep. <g>

mxh

annc
03-09-2005, 01:47 PM
The program, or Judi Dench's singing? <g>

I liked it, but it only was broadcast locally once (that I know of), and I missed most of the episodes.

I have trouble remembering to watch programs I like. I can set reminders on my digital cable thingy, but unless I'm sitting in front of the tube when the reminder pops up, it does me no good.

mxhThe program.

I forget to watch favourite programs, too. And as I watch very little television at all, it's very easy to miss them. I like to watch the ABC gardening program, which is on at 6.30 p.m. on Saturday, and have a reminder set in both Entourage and my Palm. But when it's light at 6.30 p.m., I'm usually still out in the garden working, and miss it anyway. <g>

BigJohnD
03-09-2005, 02:20 PM
I saw a documentary about Morse on public television. Lots of interesting details, including the fact that the guy who did the music (Barrington Pheloung, IIRC) incorporated Morse code into the theme music. Those musical beeping sounds apparently spell out Morse in Morse code.

How cool is that?

mxh
Barrington Pheloung went further than that - he at least once created rhythms based on spelling the murderer's name in Morse code!

Franca
03-09-2005, 03:00 PM
BBC America often reruns programs I want to see at ungodly hours, but the problem is that I have to leave the TV on to record them. Including the volume -- to record the sound, it has to be on at a normal level.That's the cool thing about satellite TV and its DVR. (Well, one of the many cool things. <g>) Neither the TV nor the sound has to be on.

It's funny that he can fall asleep in the recliner in front of the TV (even while watching something noisy), but when he goes upstairs to sleep, he says the TV's on too loud ...

I bought him a white noise machine at Sharper Image (it makes all sorts of sounds -- babbling brooks, rain, taxi horns, etc.) but he says he ends up listening to the noises and can't fall asleep. <g>I will never understand sleep. It's so different for everybody.

JVegVT
03-09-2005, 08:18 PM
I remembered that the reason we got the second TV wasn't so we could watch no matter what side we were lying on. We had a TV/VCR combo and if we were recording something, the TV had to be tuned to the same channel. It didn't work like a separate VCR that is attached to a TV. My husband's back hurts if he sits in a chair for a long time, so he often lies in bed to watch TV. But if the VCR was recording something and he wanted to watch something else, he couldn't. So we decided to spend less than $90 for another TV so he could watch anything he wanted even when the combo was recording.

The VCR in the combo developed a problem (it was eating tapes), so we no longer use that VCR. The TV is fine, though. We got a separate VCR to replace the broken VCR and the TV doesn't have to be tuned to the same channel that's recording. So we have two TVs that are still useful because we don't have to lie on one side to watch.
--Judy M.

ElyseC
03-09-2005, 08:40 PM
<gg> You should put one on the ceiling, too, so when you're on your back you will get "stereo" sound from the other two!

ElyseC
03-09-2005, 08:43 PM
Direct-to-home satellite reception can be temperamental at times. Sometimes channels break up in heavy rain or snow, and sometimes the dish might get out of alignment - one degree out is enough.Strangely, in southern CA we had more weather related troubles with satellite service and that was only in extremely heavy rain, but here in Iowa -- with snow, rain, sleet, hail, and lots more cloudy-sky days than ever were in the Los Angeles area -- satellite reception has been flawless.

JVegVT
03-09-2005, 08:48 PM
I bet my husband would like a ceiling TV. He likes to lie on his back.
--Judy M.

ElyseC
03-09-2005, 08:52 PM
Well, there you go! Glad to help! No charge for the idea! <g>

marlene
03-10-2005, 02:49 PM
Barrington Pheloung went further than that - he at least once created rhythms based on spelling the murderer's name in Morse code!

Wow. He really is a clever sort.

mxh

marlene
03-10-2005, 02:52 PM
The telly's on almost all the time here. It's not unusual for me to wake up in the morning and toddle downstairs to find Mr. E gone out but the TV still on.

I usually watch TV late at night (when it's quiet -- even the dogs are asleep), starting with the Daily Show at 11 pm. Then maybe Letterman, maybe Craig Ferguson, or a movie. It's bad, though when I start watching a movie at midnight -- I stay up way too late and then can't wake up in the morning.

mxh

marlene
03-10-2005, 02:57 PM
That's the cool thing about satellite TV and its DVR.

We were told at one point that our location would not be good for satellite TV. I don't remember if it had to do with elevation (lack of it) or all the big trees around us.

I will never understand sleep. It's so different for everybody.

I'm a chronic insomniac -- not only do I not understand sleep, I don't understand how to fall into it!

mxh

Shane Stanley
03-10-2005, 04:18 PM
I saw a documentary about Morse on public television. Lots of interesting details, including the fact that the guy who did the music (Barrington Pheloung, IIRC) incorporated Morse code into the theme music. Those musical beeping sounds apparently spell out Morse in Morse code.

How cool is that?

Even cooler -- it doesn't spell out "Morse", it spells out his first name...

Shane