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View Full Version : Time to get Stoned?


John Spragens
01-27-2005, 05:31 PM
Creativepro had a pointer to a tempting new font from Sumner Stone -- Magma (http://www.stonetypefoundry.com/html_pages/MagmaOverview.html).

While I was looking around on the site, I also found Cycles (http://www.stonetypefoundry.com/html_pages/CyclesOverview.html), which was new to me.

Haven't spent any money (or invented projects that really need either), but they look like they'd be fun to use.

ktinkel
01-27-2005, 06:00 PM
Creativepro had a pointer to a tempting new font from Sumner Stone -- Magma (http://www.stonetypefoundry.com/html_pages/MagmaOverview.html).

While I was looking around on the site, I also found Cycles (http://www.stonetypefoundry.com/html_pages/CyclesOverview.html), which was new to me.

Haven't spent any money (or invented projects that really need either), but they look like they'd be fun to use.
Sumner Stone is one of my favorite designers. He was director of type development in the early days at Adobe.

His Silica is one of my all-time favorite slab serif faces, and ITC Bodoni, which was developed under Sumner’s guidance, is the best Bodoni available today, as it includes bracketed serifs, as in the originals. (Most 20th-century Bodonis pretend there are no brackets, and most are hard to read, in part for that reason.)

Arepo (which as you may notice is Opera spelled backwards) is a lovely face.

Cycles is also superb. He designed it for a book of his wife’s (noted photographer Judy Dater) work.

So is Stone Print, especially if you need to produce a newspaper or newsletter or other narrow-columned publication. This was introduced in Print magazine in the early 1990s; Print has just recently undergone a redo, and abandoned the face — not, I suspect, for the better.

I also really like the original Stone extended family. Stone Sans and Stone Informal were designed especially for the low-res [300 dpi] LaserWriter, but they as well as Stone (serif) are well designed in the classical sense, with obeisance to both calligraphy and oldstyle type design. They work well no matter what resolution.

Magma is new to me, but it looks very useful (especially the set designed for use when knocked out).

I am glad to see that Sumner is still working on type; I thought he had retired.

[BTW: I cloaked your URLs to make the message easier to read. I hope you don’t mind.]

Norman Hathaway
01-28-2005, 05:59 AM
Wow. Hats off for the thread title KT !

ktinkel
01-28-2005, 06:47 AM
Wow. Hats off for the thread title KT !
Thanks, but all credit goes to John Spragens!

John Spragens
01-28-2005, 08:05 AM
Ah, thanks for linking the links. That provoked me to look around a bit and find out how to do it myself. Maybe I'll even remember ...

ktinkel
01-28-2005, 08:46 AM
Ah, thanks for linking the links. That provoked me to look around a bit and find out how to do it myself. Maybe I'll even remember ...
You don’t have to remember, really — just click on the vB Code Is On link and you’ll get a handy-dandy crib sheet. I pull it off to the side, and copy what I need.

I’m active on several PHP boards of different flavors, and they all have slightly different rules, so the crib sheets are a godsend!

fhaber
02-13-2005, 03:46 PM
Wow, Cycles is certainly a knockout onscreen As a Yahoo (g), I'd love to see its text color as set in a 55-wide classic paragraph, at my max res - 1200dpi laser, on indifferent paper from Staples. Stone's fonts have always excelled under abuse (g).

Stone's stuff also usually looks better than the competition on a monitor, as opposed to printed. He's a devil that way, isn't he?

Has anyone ever commented here on the fact that paper amd screem are converging, in the era of LCD flat panel monitors? The hazy glow that CRTs produce onscreen is becoming the exception, rather than the rule, and (for me) screen matches paper much better now. Comments?

ktinkel
02-13-2005, 05:57 PM
Stone's stuff also usually looks better than the competition on a monitor, as opposed to printed. He's a devil that way, isn't he?Maybe. But he is a master in print.

It happens Sumner went to the same college I did (as did Chuck Bigelow and Kris Holmes, of Lucida fame; and Steve Jobs, briefly), which was dominated by the American master of calligraphy, Lloyd Reynolds. More than anything else, I find Stone’s fonts to reflect a calligraphic background.

Anyway, he did develop the Stone family (especially Informal and Sans) to accommodate low-resolution (300 dpi) printers. But he also oversaw ITC Bodoni — a face that really does not appreciate resolution restrictions — and did a masterly job. It is, bar none, the best Bodoni since Bodoni himself (and Bodoni had to create a different design for every size and style, and spent a lifetime doing it).

Has anyone ever commented here on the fact that paper and screen are converging, in the era of LCD flat panel monitors? The hazy glow that CRTs produce onscreen is becoming the exception, rather than the rule, and (for me) screen matches paper much better now. Comments?I don’t know if anyone has made that point. I probably wouldn’t. In fact, I think the luminance of any monitor is enough to make online type really different from print type.

On the other hand (I often play my own devil’s advocate), a good LCD monitor makes text look more like text on paper than anything I have seen before.

But the luminance still makes problems. I would still rather read ink on paper than dots on the screen. Do you really relish the notion of reading a novel on the screen?

ktinkel
02-13-2005, 05:58 PM
Wow, Cycles is certainly a knockout onscreenSumner Stone designed Cycles for his wife, noted photographer Judy Dater. They used it in a book on her work.

Just a note.

fhaber
02-14-2005, 08:01 AM
Were you all together in that college at the same time? Did you appreciate the fact that you were in typographic Valhalla?

(Paper vs. glowing screen): I rarely see anyone make that point in the PC world. It deserves mentioning occasionally, even at the expense of ridiculously over-marketing my point (g). I dimly recall how much more legible the Mac fonts (even bitmap) were in the 9" screen days, so it's probably common wisdom there, right? And don't I remember that IBM did some research on this in the really primitive (character generator, fixed-pitch, 9x14 dots) days?

(Reading novels onscreen): We all do these days, at least in quantity, and it's painful, and that's affected discourse, I think (trying to be measured).

Did anything widely available ever use Stone's Bodoni for a body face? I might look it up at 42nd street, if it hasn't been stolen yet (no g).

Franca
02-14-2005, 10:11 AM
Creativepro had a pointer to a tempting new font from Sumner Stone -- Magma (http://www.stonetypefoundry.com/html_pages/MagmaOverview.html).

While I was looking around on the site, I also found Cycles (http://www.stonetypefoundry.com/html_pages/CyclesOverview.html), which was new to me.Both very handsome, I agree. Hanging around here could be expensive ... keep educating me and exposing me to such lovely fonts and I may find myself buying them whether I have an immediate use for them or not! =:-o

ktinkel
02-14-2005, 11:22 AM
Were you all together in that college at the same time? Did you appreciate the fact that you were in typographic Valhalla?It was Reed College, and it is interesting that the type designers were all there about the same time. Have no idea what they thought about it (only met any of these people after 1985), but everyone who studied with Lloyd Reynolds felt as if they were close to greatness.

I looked in an old alumni directory and see that Sumner Stone, Chuck Bigelow, and Paul Shaw (forgot to mention him earlier) were all in the class of 1967; and Bigelow’s partner Kris Holmes was class of 1972. (I was in the class of 1963, so was long gone before these kids came along.)

I dimly recall how much more legible the Mac fonts (even bitmap) were in the 9" screen days, so it's probably common wisdom there, right? And don't I remember that IBM did some research on this in the really primitive (character generator, fixed-pitch, 9x14 dots) days?It was easy to make dot-matrix fonts for the Mac because every aspect was under control: Everyone used not only the identical screen but we all used the same dot matrix printers as well. The pixels and dots were the same size as the IBM version of typographic points, which helped. Those letters were drawn dot by dot.

They sure were easy to read, especially compared to the descender-less green things we had been dealing with before!

When Apple came out with TrueType, they converted all those early screen fonts (Geneva, Chicago, Monaco, etc.) to digital outlines. Apparently it was tricky, because the early fonts did not exactly fit the pattern for digital fonts, and they wanted the main set of sizes to match the bitmaps exactly.

Did anything widely available ever use Stone's Bodoni for a body face? I might look it up at 42nd street, if it hasn't been stolen yet (no g).I don’t remember, but probably. The ITC Bodoni project had a lot of ballyhoo — presentations at Seybold Seminars, exhibitions at ATypI meetings, articles in magazines, the whole nine yards. But I don’t remember any notable use.

Type designer Dave Farey wrote an article on Bodoni faces (http://www.fonthaus.com/xheight/bodoni.cfm) in general and the pursuit of the “true” Bodoni for xheight magazine. You might like it, even if it doesn’t tell us where to find the ITC fonts in use!