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Cristen Gillespie
03-18-2006, 06:14 PM
A friend has sent me a file with some letters from a font that she is trying to identify. She has looked in a number of places, but keeps finding a slight difference in one letter or another.

Can anyone help?

Norbert
03-19-2006, 10:37 AM
Can anyone help?

Sorry, Cristen... gotta run to a baby's first birthday party.
There are some unique aspects to the face, like the lower case "t" that doesn't "jive" with standard Cheltenham, but the Font Bureau looks closer.

It also reminds me of some of the newspaper display faces that Jim Parkinson designs (http://www.typedesign.com/fontlist01.html). Maybe I can revisit Monday. Good luck.

ktinkel
03-19-2006, 11:59 AM
A friend has sent me a file with some letters from a font that she is trying to identify. She has looked in a number of places, but keeps finding a slight difference in one letter or another.

Can anyone help?Not me. The closest thing I can find is OLContact Classic Bold Condensed (http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/ortizlopez/ol-contact-classic/bold-cond/), and that is not this face. It has something of the width and blackness, but that’s about it.

Maybe Norbert will know.

iamback
03-19-2006, 01:13 PM
Sorry, Cristen... gotta run to a baby's first birthday party.
There are some unique aspects to the face, like the lower case "t" that doesn't "jive" with standard Cheltenham, but the Font Bureau looks closer.Funny you should mention that - I don't know Cheltenham but I did notice that - to my eyes - that 't' just didn't seem to fit in! Could it actually have come from a different font?

Cristen Gillespie
03-20-2006, 08:13 AM
Sorry, Cristen... gotta run to a baby's first birthday party.
There are some unique aspects to the face, like the lower case "t" that doesn't "jive" with standard Cheltenham, but the Font Bureau looks closer.

It also reminds me of some of the newspaper display faces that Jim Parkinson designs (http://www.typedesign.com/fontlist01.html). Maybe I can revisit Monday. Good luck.

I hope the baby had fun. '-) I'll send her the link to Jim Parkinson--fellow must be a Bay Area resident, judging from his font names. Thanks.

Cristen Gillespie
03-20-2006, 08:20 AM
Not me. The closest thing I can find is OLContact Classic Bold Condensed (http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/ortizlopez/ol-contact-classic/bold-cond/), and that is not this face. It has something of the width and blackness, but that’s about it.


I can see it's not quite OLContact... She only has a couple of words to go by, and it's possible it goes back to pre-digital days. It may remain a mystery and her client will have to make do with close but no cigar.

Thanks.

Cristen Gillespie
03-20-2006, 08:28 AM
Funny you should mention that - I don't know Cheltenham but I did notice that - to my eyes - that 't' just didn't seem to fit in! Could it actually have come from a different font?

I gather probably not, but that's not to say the whole thing wasn't created as a one-off just for the words that were going to be used. Her client's request would indicate that the client thinks the font was once generally available, but it's possible that is an assumption, not what really happened.

And with all the fonts in the world, it could just be one that never was popular, based on something that was, and we'd not find it. I'm fairly certain that if KT doesn't recognize it, it was never much of a font, or like you said, it's been messed with in some way.<G>

ktinkel
03-20-2006, 08:50 AM
I hope the baby had fun. '-) I'll send her the link to Jim Parkinson--fellow must be a Bay Area resident, judging from his font names. Thanks.Parkinson definitely does work of that style, and he is a very down-to-earth and funny guy. (I got to interview him once for Aldus or Adobe magazine.)

Among his more light-hearted work, he made a font called Mojo that tried to emulate some of the lettering of 1960s rock posters. (I hasten to add that most of his work is more serious. He reworked Metro for heads at the Chronicle, and worked with Sumner Stone on the itals for ITC Bodoni.)

Cristen Gillespie
03-21-2006, 09:05 AM
That's a great 60s font! I took a peek myself at his site. He has a lot of really nice typefaces.

My friend told me late yesterday that she took to heart no one quite coming up with a matching font, and decided on advice to see if she could manually manipulate Cheltenham (since that seemed to be the closest) easily enough to achieve that strange set of characters, and she thinks that is what must have happened. It's more likely someone took a regular font like that and distorted it than that no one can find a font that matches, and she found it wasn't very difficult to "redesign" the typeface.

Since she rather deplores doing that to a typeface, she has advised her client that she believes it has been manipulated, and they might want to rethink the project, and sends her thanks to all of you for helping her look.

Norbert
03-21-2006, 09:54 AM
That's a great 60s font!

FYI -- It's actually an early 1900s design by Alfred Roller (Vienna 1903) for an exhibition poster, which inspired Victor Moscoso to emulate in his cool Jefferson Airplane posters of the 60s, which inspired Jim Parkinson to create "Mojo".

I gave the folks at Typophile a mini-history on 60s Rock Poster.
Check out the posters I posted (http://typophile.com/node/16146) :-)

terrie
03-21-2006, 12:57 PM
norbert: It's actually an early 1900s design by Alfred Roller (Vienna 1903)Checked out your Typophile posting...the Roller poster is wonderful...

Terrie

Ian Blair
03-22-2006, 03:50 AM
A friend has sent me a file with some letters from a font that she is trying to identify. She has looked in a number of places, but keeps finding a slight difference in one letter or another.

Can anyone help?

Fascinating… It looks like a cross between Cheltenham Bold Condensed and Cheltenham Extra Bold Condensed, but it's been made bolder and some letters have been changed slightly. It could even be a 'squashed' Cheltenham Condensed Ultra.

See;
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/urw/cheltenham/d-bold-extra-condensed/
and other Cheltenham pages on this site.

Cristen Gillespie
03-22-2006, 07:30 AM
Fascinating… It looks like a cross between Cheltenham Bold Condensed and Cheltenham Extra Bold Condensed, but it's been made bolder and some letters have been changed slightly. It could even be a 'squashed' Cheltenham Condensed Ultra.

See;
http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/urw/cheltenham/d-bold-extra-condensed/
and other Cheltenham pages on this site.

That's exactly what she now thinks happened. She found the Condensed Ultra, squashed it and it very nearly matched. The remaining oddities were easy to mangle, easy enough it made sense to her that the original designer had done that. Thanks for looking, and confirming that she was on the right track.

Cristen Gillespie
03-22-2006, 07:42 AM
FYI -- It's actually an early 1900s design by Alfred Roller (Vienna 1903) for an exhibition poster, which inspired Victor Moscoso to emulate in his cool Jefferson Airplane posters of the 60s, which inspired Jim Parkinson to create "Mojo".

I gave the folks at Typophile a mini-history on 60s Rock Poster.
Check out the posters I posted (http://typophile.com/node/16146) :-)

Would the origins be the Art Nouveau era? I seem to associate that lettering (before it met Wavy Gravy<G>), with Mucha's posters. His type, though, didn't go nearly as far as your Alfred Roller Poster, which is much more interlocking, and, as you say, practically THE design for the 60s.