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ktinkel
03-16-2006, 01:56 PM
Describing the fonts as “proof of concept,” SIL International (http://software.newsforge.com/software/06/03/09/2140223.shtml?tid=132&tid=130) has released two new free fonts: Charis, similar to Bitstream Charter, in the standard four styles; and Doulos, “compatible with” Times Roman, in one weight only.

Unlike SIL’s earlier Gentium, these new fonts have more than 2400 charaacters, with support for Latin, Cyrillic, and linguistic uses. They are “smart” — if you use them in an application that understands OpenType, Apple Advanced Typography, or SIL’s Graphite, ligatures and diacritics are automatically substituted.

These are not earth-shattering designs but they seem to be of decent quality, and they are text rather than display fonts, so usable in cases where you need to distribute fonts to many readers without need of additional licenses. If you could persuade your visitors to download the fonts, they could even be used on web sites.

Anyway, I have attached a couple of samples of the basic character set, the Charter-like Charis on the left, Doulos on the right.

ktinkel
03-16-2006, 02:41 PM
For the sake of completeness, here are images of other open source, freely distributable fonts meant mainly for on-screen use. They can be copied or modified, so long as you change the name; and can be distributed over a network or throughout a business.

I find the Sans is very similar to Verdana (which is a little wider), so I include a sample of Verdana for comparison in the first screen shot.

Bitstream Vera Sans, Vera Sans Mono, and Vera Serif (http://www.bitstream.com/font_rendering/products/dev_fonts/vera.html).

You need to go to the GNOME site to download the Vera fonts (http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/GNOME/sources/ttf-bitstream-vera/1.10/).

ktinkel
03-16-2006, 02:46 PM
And here is the last open source font for the screen, released first by its designer, Victor Gaultney, and later transferred to the SIL open source organization: Gentium (http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&item_id=Gentium), which was mentioned in the first message in this thread.

Does anyone know of any others?

iamback
03-16-2006, 03:27 PM
Describing the fonts as “proof of concept,” SIL International (http://software.newsforge.com/software/06/03/09/2140223.shtml?tid=132&tid=130) has released two new free fonts: Charis, similar to Bitstream Charter, in the standard four styles; and Doulos, “compatible with” Times Roman, in one weight only.Nice - especially with the good Unicode support. Downloaded already.

What about the Bitstream fonts - Open Source but not free? Or am I missing something? (Another "IQ test"?)

Michael Rowley
03-16-2006, 04:01 PM
KT:

Does anyone know of any others?

There's David Perry's Cardo, also free.

ktinkel
03-16-2006, 05:05 PM
What about the Bitstream fonts - Open Source but not free? Or am I missing something? Sorry — yes, free. Utterly.

ktinkel
03-16-2006, 05:11 PM
There's David Perry's Cardo, also free.Interesting, and what I would call semi-free. Not an open source license, in any event. (Scholars can use it freely but publishers cannot. And it isn’t clear what sort of online use it can have.)

I downloaded it though, and will take a look. He says it is Bembo-like, which might be lovely.

Thanks. I had not heard of it.

iamback
03-16-2006, 09:45 PM
Sorry — yes, free. Utterly.OK - another IQ test then. I didn't see any download link. I did see a "Contact sales" link. Any hints for my poor tired brain?

iamback
03-16-2006, 09:57 PM
There's David Perry's Cardo, also free.On http://scholarsfonts.net/ I read: "11/01/05 Cardo 1.01 will be posted by the end of the month!" - I can only find Cardo 0.98 though, released November 2004.

ktinkel
03-17-2006, 05:26 AM
On http://scholarsfonts.net/ I read: "11/01/05 Cardo 1.01 will be posted by the end of the month!" - I can only find Cardo 0.98 though, released November 2004.Same here. Not sure, but maybe this is a part-time endeavor.

ktinkel
03-17-2006, 05:31 AM
OK - another IQ test then. I didn't see any download link. I did see a "Contact sales" link. Any hints for my poor tired brain?I think I had a lapse of clear thinking. You do need to go to the GNOME site to download the Vera fonts (http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/GNOME/sources/ttf-bitstream-vera/1.10/).

Mea culpa.

Michael Rowley
03-17-2006, 08:15 AM
KT:

I would call semi-free

As you mention it, I took a look at the 'Embedding' tab in Properties (Windows only, I am afraid), and it says 'Editable embedding allowed'. However, Cardo 71 is a TTF font, but not OpenType.

ktinkel
03-17-2006, 08:32 AM
As you mention it, I took a look at the 'Embedding' tab in Properties (Windows only, I am afraid), and it says 'Editable embedding allowed'. However, Cardo 71 is a TTF font, but not OpenType.Not sure what those have to do with whether it is free or not. The other “open source” fonts are completely free and may be modified and redistributed.

It also makes no claims of being OpenType, but it is Unicode based, with nearly 3,000 characters, including some Greek and other scholarly scripts.

Here is what the Terms of Use say:This font is free for personal, non-commercial, or non-profit use. It may also be used to prepare camera-ready copy for papers that will appear in academic journals, even if the author of the paper receives remuneration for article. Any other commercial use (including the printing of books to be sold at a profit) requires the purchase of an appropriate license.

Michael Rowley
03-17-2006, 11:35 AM
KT:

Not sure what those have to do with whether it is free or not

No, the embedding information only gives the standard information included in the font file itself, which all OTF and TTF fonts have (in Type 1 fonts it is lacking. I believe this standard is recognized by all the leading font manufacturers, and it is certainly followed by Adobe & Microsoft. In Windows, the embedding information is provided by the properties extensions, as well as ten other categories of information, such as the OpenType tables that the font covers.

The difficulty about the licensor's terms of use is that the user of the font can have no idea what they are once the font is on his computer. It is standard for font licensor's to grant licences for up to five computers, but that condition is virtually unenforceable; what the licensor can do is restrict embedding.

Embedding terms are briefly summarized (the actual terms are generally a little longer) as (a) no embedding allowed, (b) embedding for previewing and printing allowed, (c) editable embedding allowed, and (d) installable embedding allowed. Usually the most severe condition used by wise licensors is (b), since (a) would allow only the purchaser to see the results of using the font.

Incidentally, I don't know how to extract a font (if allowed) from a document I have acquired; but presumably if you're clever enough you can.

iamback
03-17-2006, 04:04 PM
I think I had a lapse of clear thinking. You do need to go to the GNOME site to download the Vera fonts (http://ftp.gnome.org/pub/GNOME/sources/ttf-bitstream-vera/1.10/).Ah, thanks. Got it!

Gerry Kowarsky
03-17-2006, 04:51 PM
And here is the last open source font for the screen, released first by its designer, Victor Gaultney, and later transferred to the SIL open source organization: Gentium (http://scripts.sil.org/cms/scripts/page.php?site_id=nrsi&item_id=Gentium), which was mentioned in the first message in this thread.

Does anyone know of any others?
There's Junicode (http://junicode.sourceforge.net/), which is described in the documentation as
a family of fonts designed especially for use by scholars who work with western medieval languages. However, since it aims to include all Unicode Latin script characters, it is useful to scholars and others working with a wide variety of languages. Junicode is based on a typeface used at the Clarendon Press in the seventeenth and early eighteenth centuries: more specifically, the basic characters in the regular style are taken from George Hickes, Linguarum vett. septentrionalium thesaurus grammatico-criticus et archaeologicus (1703-05); additional characters are designed to be consistent with those in Hickes. The italic style is a new design inspired partly by the italics in Hickes.
In the Private Use Area, Junicode contains a number of characters that are of particular interest to medievalists. The fonts partially implements the Medieval Unicode Font Initiative standard (http://gandalf.aksis.uib.no/mufi/); a future release will implement the standard completely. Junicode is made available under the Gnu General Public License. This means that you can obtain the source code for Junicode and that you are free to adapt it for your own purposes and even distribute your adapted version to others, as long as you allow them the same freedom to adapt your font that you have with Junicode.
Junicode has small caps in the same part of the private use area as Adobe's OpenType Pro Fonts.

ktinkel
03-17-2006, 05:50 PM
There's Junicode (http://junicode.sourceforge.net/) … Junicode has small caps in the same part of the private use area as Adobe's OpenType Pro Fonts.Thanks — very interesting. I just got it, and maybe tomorrow will add a specimen to this thread. May as well be complete (after all, these threads last forever!)

Why, you could use this to illustrate The Lord of the Rings! <g>

Gerry Kowarsky
03-18-2006, 07:48 AM
Why, you could use this to illustrate The Lord of the Rings! <g>

The original (pre-Unicode) Old English Font Pack (http://www.engl.virginia.edu/OE/Fonts.About.html) from the same source might be even better for LOTR illustration. Lots of interesting letter forms.

What do you think of the capital T in Junicode? I think it is the most unusual character.

ktinkel
03-18-2006, 08:32 AM
The original (pre-Unicode) Old English Font Pack (http://www.engl.virginia.edu/OE/Fonts.About.html) from the same source might be even better for LOTR illustration. Lots of interesting letter forms.

What do you think of the capital T in Junicode? I think it is the most unusual character.The Old English Font Pack is allergic to my system, both the Windows TT and the Mac Type 1 version. (Or maybe StuffIt Expander is allergic to the archives.)

I did make a specimen of Junicode (just the basic characters; not sure how to find the special ones). The capital T is very wide; there are also some odd variations in stem width, especially in the caps. Generally, it reminds me a bit of Sabon.