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Michael Rowley
01-23-2006, 03:25 PM
'The yogh, a letter not found on modern keyboards. The letter, encoded in Unicode at 021C for upper case and 012D for lower case is included in the Windows Vista version of Times New Roman, Arial and the UI fonts, so maybe we'll see a yogh renaissance?'

This short piece, taken from Microsoft's typography pages, was occasioned by the recent prominence of Sir Menzies ('Ming') Campbell in the UK news. There is a link to the BBC's article on the yogh, which occurs in the Scottish name Menzies disguised as a z. (You all know that, don't you?)

John Spragens
01-24-2006, 05:29 PM
Can you link to the article?

Howard White
01-25-2006, 11:40 AM
Can you link to the article?

I can:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/magazine/4595228.stm

HW

Michael Rowley
01-25-2006, 02:11 PM
John:

'Can you link to the article?'

I see you've been given the link to the article, but a more general link is this:

http://www.microsoft.com/typography/default.mspx

Just follow the link to 'Links, news, . . .' and you'll see all the links that Microsoft has gathered. The snippets are always bang up to date, and go back quite far.

John Spragens
02-01-2006, 05:14 PM
Thanks. And thanks to Michael for the tip on the MS page.

Glad I don't have to pronounce those languages of the isles. Have a friend in Wales ... and no clue how to pronounce the place names I see in her address.

Michael Rowley
02-02-2006, 09:05 AM
John:

'Glad I don't have to pronounce those languages of the isles'

There are one or two Scots words and the odd name (such as Menzies) in which the 'z' has been substituted for the obsolete yogh, but generally the yogh is used only in Anglo-saxon etc. The yogh became 'news' because Sir Menzies Campbell was in the UK news recently, and he is known to acquaintences as Ming. I don't suppose his name made much of a splash in US news!

dthomsen8
02-15-2006, 05:44 AM
Glad I don't have to pronounce those languages of the isles. Have a friend in Wales ... and no clue how to pronounce the place names I see in her address.

Land developers in the 19th century took place names from Wales for places in the Philadelphia suburbs, leaving modern visitors puzzling over Bryn Mawr, Bala Cynwyd, Llanarch, and the like today. There is one I cannot say, either, but I don't quite remember how to spell it. Maybe I can find it on a map, though.

Michael Rowley
02-15-2006, 11:46 AM
'Land developers in the 19th century took place names from Wales for places in the Philadelphia suburbs'

The only name I recognize (but don't know how to pronounce) is Brynmawr (one word), but I can help myself by consulting the BBC Pronouncing Dictionary of British Names, which costs very little and can help public speakers' and others' suffering embarassment. I don't know whether there's an American equivalent, but there should be, because the American pronunciation of French, Spanish, Red Indian, etc. names can be difficult too.