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ktinkel
01-13-2006, 05:53 AM
Phil Gaskill has sent me the snippet attached to see if I can identify it. No luck so far, so I figured I would ask the rest of you.

Norbert
01-13-2006, 07:39 PM
Phil Gaskill has sent me the snippet attached to see if I can identify it. No luck so far, so I figured I would ask the rest of you.

This one is hard because to really ID it, you need a full character set showing of a small point size metal face.

From what I can see, it has some characteristics of a Century Extended or Century Schoolbook - from early cuts in hot metal. The smaller the point size, the wider some faces got, and shapes differed slightly as well. Plus, if this is a small point size metal impression, ink spread might be a factor in making it look heavier. The numeral one (1) throws me off since I can't spot a small sample anywhere.

http://www.acmedigital.net/images/CentSchBld.png

So what I'm guessing is that it might be an early hot metal cut of Century Schoolbook Bold or Extended Bold at a small point size therefore optically scaled (which might account for width and subtle differences). But to me it kinda "feels" right.

ktinkel
01-14-2006, 07:26 AM
So what I'm guessing is that it might be an early hot metal cut of Century Schoolbook Bold or Extended Bold at a small point size therefore optically scaled (which might account for width and subtle differences). I thought of a wide Century, too, and figured it was foundry type. But that 1 isn’t in any examples I can find, even in small sizes.

I think it is an example from France, and if it is old enough, identifying the literal face may be tricky.

Phil says he can provide a larger sample — I just asked him for that, and to specify the size of the original, if he knows.

Thanks.

rakman4
01-14-2006, 04:36 PM
The type looks just like the markings you find all over scores of Debussy and Ravel published by Editions Durand, many of which are now in the public domain (in the USA) and thus available in Dover editions. The marking in question was likely cut in the 1880s or 1890s. Not that that will be so helpful. I got some strange hybrid between Latin Wide and Century Schoolbook, but don't quote me (too late). I've been teaching Debussy's "Syrinx" (a solo flute piece) for many years now, and this font is, of course, very familiar to me now. You might find more examples in the Dover edition of the Debussy Preludes (or Préludes, if the diacritics show up correctly here).

ktinkel
01-14-2006, 05:21 PM
The type looks just like the markings you find all over scores of Debussy and Ravel published by Editions Durand, many of which are now in the public domain (in the USA) and thus available in Dover editions. The marking in question was likely cut in the 1880s or 1890s. Thanks. It was from a Durand score; Phil conducts a small orchestra in NYC. He is also a typographer, so may be trying to reproduce something from the score for a performance (I didn’t think to ask him, actually).

If you don’t mind, I will tell him about your experience. Maybe he will pop up and discuss it further — who knows. Meanwhile, I have attached another specimen.

Thanks.