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annc
12-31-2005, 02:50 PM
I'm under doctor's orders to avoid alcohol for two months, and possibly forever. So I need to find something to sip of an evening, and when I go to the pub or a restaurant with friends.

So – what do you suggest I try? Other than the boring orange juice or mineral water. There are some criteria, of course:

non-alcoholic
not sweet
suitable for drinking before/with dinner
suitable for drinking after working hard in the garden or with the horses (i.e. long and thirst-quenching)
non-fattening
not expensive
Of course, you could always suggest two – one as a replacement for that welcome beer after working with the horses or in the garden, and one to replace wine at dinner.

All suggestions welcome.

Candy Jens
12-31-2005, 05:34 PM
Quinine water? Or bitter lemon? Both very cooling . . .

Candy

annc
12-31-2005, 05:44 PM
Quinine water? Or bitter lemon? Both very cooling . . .

CandyQuinine water? What's that?

Shane Stanley
12-31-2005, 09:32 PM
All suggestions welcome.

A second opinion...

Shane

annc
12-31-2005, 10:20 PM
A second opinion...LOL! She admits to also drinking more than the recommended two standard drinks a day, but has suggested I give it up for two months to see if my liver function improves. If it doesn't, then we'll look to something else as the cause. It can't hurt me to abstain for 59 days, and I'll save some money as well as maybe lose some weight ...

Richard Waller
12-31-2005, 11:59 PM
It has got to be tea. Preferably strong with milk. Every hour on the hour.

The doctors all tell me I should drinhg two litres of water each day.

marlene
01-01-2006, 12:45 AM
Is cider out of the question (too sweet)?

I don't drink alcohol at all, so we usually keep bottles of sparkling cider on hand so I'll have something interesting to drink while everyone else is getting plastered.

mxh

Kelvyn
01-01-2006, 01:01 AM
Is cider out of the question (too sweet)?

That's not English cider then? Traditional country drink made from fermented apples, can be sweet or dry, flat or sparkling, and slightly (3-5%) or more (up to 12%) alcoholic. Usually more alcohol content than beers.

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 07:35 AM
I'm under doctor's orders to avoid alcohol for two months, and possibly forever. Some bottled waters have more personality than others. In fact, one of the most common here, Pellagrino from Italy, is really pleasant, especially with a twist of lime.

I suspect that iced tea is as alien to you guys as it is in England, but strongly flavored teas served over ice are refreshing and some of them go well with food. I love iced lapsang souchong (a smoky black Chinese tea) with smoked salmon or, indeed, any smoked food, including ham. Make it strong, and pour it hot over a pile of ice.

Quinine water, which someone else mentioned, is often called tonic here (it is the mixer for gin and tonic). I find it a little sweet, but over enough ice it could be refreshing, especially with some citrus twist to cut the sugary quality.

Really good ginger beer is also good, and it can be fierce enough to distract you from your durance vile. The ones I like best come from Jamaica — they are not much like the ubiquitous ginger ale (though I like that too, sometimes).

Fresh water with a splash of one or another of the Italian syrups — pomegranate, almond, lemon — can be nice too. Don’t make them as heavy as a soft drink, more like a non-alcoholic kir.

There is non-alcoholic beer (and wine, for that matter). I have never tasted them, and would cast a wary eye, but you might check some of them out. Maybe they are less awful than one would think.

Richard Hunt
01-01-2006, 08:01 AM
Quinine water? What's that?

Maybe what we call tonic water?

Richard

Richard Hunt
01-01-2006, 08:05 AM
Umm, cider is usually about 6%, so stronger than most beers.

Richard

Richard Hunt
01-01-2006, 08:17 AM
I find a mix or orange juice, pineapple juice and sparkling mineral water is good. Personally I find juice on its own too sticky. I also quite like lime or peppermit cordial.

Forget nonalcoholic beers - they are dreadful, very bland and gassy.

Richard

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 08:34 AM
It can't hurt me to abstain for 59 days ...That’s two months in Australia, huh? Hereabouts it is 60! <g>

Richard Hunt
01-01-2006, 08:43 AM
January = 31 days, February = 28 days, total 59 days ;-)

Richard

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 10:27 AM
January = 31 days, February = 28 days, total 59 days ;-)Yeah, yeah — kinda splitting hairs, aren’t we? Tsk. ;)

marlene
01-01-2006, 10:38 AM
No, it's not the same as the alcoholic English cider -- it's got no alcohol. I suppose it's just carbonated fruit juice. <g>

Brand name is Martinelli. I think they also make other "sparkling" juice drinks.

mxh

marlene
01-01-2006, 10:41 AM
Stateside, cider is not alcoholic, although it certainly gets that way if you leave it long enough. <g> Sometimes we buy fresh pressed cider from local orchards, and it does get rather tangy when it starts to ferment after a week or so. I think if you leave it long enough, it might turn into vinegar.

Martinelli's bottled sparkling cider has no alcohol content at all -- it's safe for children (and teetotalers like me).

mxh

annc
01-01-2006, 10:50 AM
Maybe what we call tonic water?Ah. I thought the quinine bit sounded familiar. You'e probably right.

annc
01-01-2006, 10:52 AM
Yeah, yeah — kinda splitting hairs, aren’t we? Tsk. ;)I bet if you were told to give up alcohol for two months, you'd count the exact number of days, too! http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/wink.gif

annc
01-01-2006, 10:55 AM
It has got to be tea. Preferably strong with milk. Every hour on the hour.

The doctors all tell me I should drinhg two litres of water each day.I actually drink quite a lot of green tea these days, mostly in the morning. It's very refreshing, but is taken fairly weak and without any milk, of course. I've never been much of a milk drinker (except in iced coffee!) and found that I was using less and less, and the tea was too strong. I always enjoy the green tea at Chinese restaurants, so moving to green tea was the obvious solution, and I love it.

And do you drink the two litres of water? You do know, don't you, that adding the tea makes the drink a diuretic? http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/wink.gif

annc
01-01-2006, 10:57 AM
Is cider out of the question (too sweet)?

I don't drink alcohol at all, so we usually keep bottles of sparkling cider on hand so I'll have something interesting to drink while everyone else is getting plastered.I do like dry cider, but it is very gassy, and is an alcoholic drink here.

annc
01-01-2006, 11:05 AM
Thanks for those suggestions. I drink several mugs of green tea a day, so would prefer to try something else before/during my evening meal. Unfortunately, I don't like the taste of tonic water, although it's many years since I tried it (and then it was only with gin, of course!)

The other suggestions sound very good. I could make this a great experiment, I think. Where do you get the Italian syrups? Supermarket? Deli? Hotel?

Maybe I should try some non-alcoholic wine and beer. Like you, I've never tried them.

Franca
01-01-2006, 11:05 AM
If you're out at a bar you can always ask for a "virgin" version of any of those fruit-and-alcohol drinks, assuming you would drink them with alcohol in them. If you don't like them to begin with you might still not like them. ;)

For the after-gardening beer, there actually are some decent non-alcoholic beers. Don't know what you might have there so can't make a specific recommendation - experimentation required!

annc
01-01-2006, 11:11 AM
I find a mix or orange juice, pineapple juice and sparkling mineral water is good. Personally I find juice on its own too sticky. I also quite like lime or peppermit cordial.

Forget nonalcoholic beers - they are dreadful, very bland and gassy.Thanks for the warning on the non-alcoholic beers, Richard. I hate very gassy drinks, and one glass of beer is all I can take, even when I'm really hot after working with the horses or in the garden. I'll look for the peppermint cordial. I have lemon cordial in the house all the time for drinking as a weak mixture during the day, because the tap water here is necessarily very chlorine-tasting, but haven't tried peppermint.

I could actually make my own peppermint water, of course - plenty of the stuff growing in the garden.

annc
01-01-2006, 11:19 AM
If you're out at a bar you can always ask for a "virgin" version of any of those fruit-and-alcohol drinks, assuming you would drink them with alcohol in them. If you don't like them to begin with you might still not like them. ;)

For the after-gardening beer, there actually are some decent non-alcoholic beers. Don't know what you might have there so can't make a specific recommendation - experimentation required!I'm not much of a fruit salad drinker when out at a pub, so I'll probably pass on that. Maybe a soda, lime and bitters will be the go there. I find that carbonated mineral water or orange juice just bloat me because I drink them too fast. Or something. I need something that I will sip.

Hmmm, maybe I should try some of the non-alcoholic beers. Or ginger beer, maybe. But not the home-made stuff. My mother always had a ginger beer bug going when I was a child, and my father would make the ginger beer. Nothing like a bottle or two going bang in the middle of the night to scare the living daylights out of a small child. http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/biggrin.gif

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 11:53 AM
Where do you get the Italian syrups? Supermarket? Deli? Hotel?Italian deli, most reliably. But I have seen a few of them in the supermarket, and sometimes in coffee shops (they sell them as adulturants for coffees).

gary
01-01-2006, 12:08 PM
With respect to NA beers, bartenders I know and friends who have been sober for a decade recommend O'Douls Amber as the best of the lot. (Keeping in mind that these are Yanks who like their beer cold and probably wouldn't appreciate a six-pack of VB)

Most of the suggestions I have (ginger ale, catawba juice) are generally carbonated.

Franca
01-01-2006, 12:10 PM
I'm not much of a fruit salad drinker when out at a pub, so I'll probably pass on that. Maybe a soda, lime and bitters will be the go there. I find that carbonated mineral water or orange juice just bloat me because I drink them too fast. Or something. I need something that I will sip. Beer is the only carbonated thing I'll drink, and one bottle pretty much does it for me. The drinks I was suggesting aren't ever carbonated. ;) But I can't make you sip them - you're on your own there!

Hmmm, maybe I should try some of the non-alcoholic beers. Or ginger beer, maybe. But not the home-made stuff. My mother always had a ginger beer bug going when I was a child, and my father would make the ginger beer. Nothing like a bottle or two going bang in the middle of the night to scare the living daylights out of a small child. http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/biggrin.gifFortunately I never experienced that!

Franca
01-01-2006, 12:11 PM
Mmm, peppermint sounds good.

annc
01-01-2006, 12:18 PM
Italian deli, most reliably. But I have seen a few of them in the supermarket, and sometimes in coffee shops (they sell them as adulturants for coffees).Ah, yes - those coffee additives. I once got a caramel latte instead of my plain flat white. The waitress (very new) insisted that it was a flat white, but the first sip was a dead giveaway. Ugh!

annc
01-01-2006, 12:20 PM
With respect to NA beers, bartenders I know and friends who have been sober for a decade recommend O'Douls Amber as the best of the lot. (Keeping in mind that these are Yanks who like their beer cold and probably wouldn't appreciate a six-pack of VB)

Most of the suggestions I have (ginger ale, catawba juice) are generally carbonated.Thanks for the recommendation, Gary. I'll ask at the bottle shop today. Not sure they sell anything non-alcoholic, but it's always worth a try. I'm not a VB fan either. My beer of choice is Hahn Ice, which makes me unpopular with the locals here, who appear to consume Fourex Gold in enormous quantities, judging by a report in the paper the other day, which said that the Castlemaine brewery at Milton had to recall brewers from their Christmas break to brew 24 hours a day. Must be the exceptionally long hot spell we're having over Christmas/New Year.

annc
01-01-2006, 12:27 PM
But I can't make you sip them - you're on your own there! Yeah. I will have to learn some elegant manners, I think. I never guzzle alcoholic drinks, but do tend to drink cordial etc. pretty fast.

Michael Rowley
01-01-2006, 12:33 PM
KT:

'Hereabouts it is 60!'

Not in January and February.

Shane Stanley
01-01-2006, 12:56 PM
I bet if you were told to give up alcohol for two months, you'd count the exact number of days, too!

Be thankful it's not a leap year...

Shane

annc
01-01-2006, 01:16 PM
Be thankful it's not a leap year...I am, believe me! Of course, if I'm forced to look at it long-term, then a day here or there won't make any difference.

Richard Waller
01-01-2006, 10:14 PM
Tea is supposed to be strong. The Sergeant Major's Brew:
bucket of hot water
1 packet of tea
1 bag of sugar
Tin of condensed milk
boil for some minutes
serve in a tin mug
- and if it doesn't take the galvanise off the bucket it is not strong enough.

annc
01-02-2006, 12:26 AM
LOL! Not my brew at all, however! ;)

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 05:25 AM
I bet if you were told to give up alcohol for two months, you'd count the exact number of days, too! http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/wink.gifI bet you’re right! :)

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 05:29 AM
Ah, yes - those coffee additives. I once got a caramel latte instead of my plain flat white. The waitress (very new) insisted that it was a flat white, but the first sip was a dead giveaway. Ugh!There are syrups that are only used for coffee, and I expect they are dreadful. But the fruit or nut-based ones from Italy are very nice.

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 05:31 AM
I could actually make my own peppermint water, of course - plenty of the stuff growing in the garden.If that is what the French call a tissane or infusion, all the mints are good possibilities. Of course, we here often drink them iced, which is quite refreshing. I like spearmint tea that way.

LenHewitt
01-02-2006, 06:32 AM
Maybe you should have added 'palatable' to your requirements, Ann. Otherwise you might get the suggestion of cider vinegar - ughhhh!

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 07:06 AM
I'm not much of a fruit salad drinker when out at a pub …I quite like a virgin mary, though. (Not surprisingly, as I begin most days with a glass of tomato juice!)

annc
01-02-2006, 11:28 AM
If that is what the French call a tissane or infusion, all the mints are good possibilities. Of course, we here often drink them iced, which is quite refreshing. I like spearmint tea that way.That's what I assumed Richard meant. Spearmint's all I've got, so that's what I'd make. http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/wink.gif

annc
01-02-2006, 11:51 AM
There are syrups that are only used for coffee, and I expect they are dreadful. But the fruit or nut-based ones from Italy are very nice.There was certainly nothing like that at my local supermarket yesterday, so maybe I need to meet my sister at one of the restaurant enclaves in Brisbane where the good delis tend to gather. This could be a delightful (and expensive) exercise. http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/smile.gif

I've decided to try a few different things. Last night was soda, lime and bitters, and apart from the gassiness, it was very refreshing. The gassiness at least ensured I sipped it slowly instead of guzzling it down! I suppose I'm okay using bitters. It's only a tiny amount, after all...

annc
01-02-2006, 11:54 AM
I quite like a virgin mary, though. (Not surprisingly, as I begin most days with a glass of tomato juice!)I've had that recommended to me elsewhere, but forgot to buy tomato juice yesterday when I went to the supermarket. It's on my grocery list for today.

How long does tabasco keep, do you know? The little bottle in my fridge has been there for many years.

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 01:25 PM
How long does tabasco keep, do you know? The little bottle in my fridge has been there for many years.In the fridge it seems to keep forever, but it does evaporate and may get a little nasty tasting. It is pretty cheap — maybe you could buy a new one with your tomato juice!

annc
01-02-2006, 01:43 PM
In the fridge it seems to keep forever, but it does evaporate and may get a little nasty tasting. It is pretty cheap — maybe you could buy a new one with your tomato juice!It's pretty full, so I doubt if it's evaporated much, if at all. However, if it is really cheap, then I should just buy a new one.

It will be good to have such a choice each evening. Thanks to everyone who has made suggestions here.

Rik Bean
01-08-2006, 07:20 AM
I'm under doctor's orders to avoid alcohol for two months, and possibly forever. So I need to find something to sip of an evening, and when I go to the pub or a restaurant with friends.

I'm in the same situation, tonic water is good (slimline versions available) as people don't know whether you have any booze in it, ginger ale works similarly - I just stand it! ;) Coke is OK too...

Slainthe!

Rik

dthomsen8
01-08-2006, 07:53 AM
Now there is a variety of flavored waters marked "diet" or "nocal" in our supermarkets. The sparkling cider is readily available, and when Americans say cider, we always mean nonalcoholic cider. Sometimes there is sparking grape juice, white or rose or red, but not reliably.

In Pennsylvania, there are no alcoholic beverages sold in supermarkets except salted cooking wine. The Commonwealth has a monopoly on distilled beverages, sold in State Stores, and almost a monopoly on wine.

annc
01-08-2006, 11:07 AM
I'm in the same situation, tonic water is good (slimline versions available) as people don't know whether you have any booze in it, ginger ale works similarly - I just stand it! ;) Coke is OK too...So far, my favourite is soda water, lime and bitters, with a Virgin Mary coming in second. I wish I'd acquired a taste for tonic, but it's evaded me over the years. Maybe I need to revisit it.

annc
01-08-2006, 11:13 AM
Now there is a variety of flavored waters marked "diet" or "nocal" in our supermarkets. The sparkling cider is readily available, and when Americans say cider, we always mean nonalcoholic cider. Sometimes there is sparking grape juice, white or rose or red, but not reliably. We have some sparkling apple juice here, which I should try. My fear is of something too sweet, and that's one reason I haven't tried the nonalcoholic wine. Yet. I hear that it is a lot sweeter than the dry whites I prefer.

In Pennsylvania, there are no alcoholic beverages sold in supermarkets except salted cooking wine. The Commonwealth has a monopoly on distilled beverages, sold in State Stores, and almost a monopoly on wine.Supermarkets aren't permitted to sell alcohol in Queensland, either, not even for cooking. The hotel lobby wields a lot of power here, and the major chains ensure that there is a bottle shop in every shopping centre that has even a small supermarket, unless there's a hotel very close by.

iamback
01-08-2006, 12:34 PM
All suggestions welcome.Green tea! Refreshing, and healthy. When you go to a pub or restaurant, switch to herbal tea if they don't have green tea.

iamback
01-08-2006, 12:38 PM
I bet if you were told to give up alcohol for two months, you'd count the exact number of days, too!I would!

iamback
01-08-2006, 12:43 PM
Tea is supposed to be strong.Not in China, it isn't! And not in my house, either. :)

ktinkel
01-08-2006, 01:01 PM
Not in China, it isn't! And not in my house, either. :)Mine, either.

I am not much of a tea drinker (roast my own coffee and prefer that most of the time), but I just had some exquisitely delicate green jasmine tea. The leaves are coiled into small loose balls (about 3/16" diameter) that unfurl in the pot, and it is brewed gently with water just off the boil. Absolutely no bitterness but a pronounced flowery quality.

To add milk, sugar, or lemon would be a sin. Very nice beverage all on its own. The company also has some black teas (generally more to my taste) — I have to try some.

annc
01-08-2006, 01:38 PM
I would!I am! And taking a leaf out of the book used by the teenagers on my dressage board, I'm allowing you all to count along with me!

annc
01-08-2006, 01:42 PM
Not in China, it isn't! And not in my house, either. :)Nor mine. And it never brews longer than two minutes, timed on a timer. I start every day with a cup of green tea, and KT wil vouch for the fact that I don't make much sense until after I've finished drinking it.

annc
01-08-2006, 01:45 PM
Green tea! Refreshing, and healthy. When you go to a pub or restaurant, switch to herbal tea if they don't have green tea.I drink two or three cups a day, starting when I first get up. Love the stuff!

But I want something different to prepare and drink of an evening. I'm finding success with soda, lime and bitters, and a Virgin Mary, although a long Virgin Mary is a bit filling. Yummy, but filling.

Rik Bean
01-09-2006, 02:08 AM
So far, my favourite is soda water, lime and bitters, with a Virgin Mary coming in second. I wish I'd acquired a taste for tonic, but it's evaded me over the years. Maybe I need to revisit it.

Never thought of adding bitters to lime and soda, I would have thought that would spoil the lime - but then I'm a sucker for lime. Virgin Mary - new to me but I guess it's a de-vodka'd Bloody Mary? What an immaculate conception... :)

ElyseC
01-09-2006, 11:39 AM
I am not much of a tea drinker (roast my own coffee and prefer that most of the time), but I just had some exquisitely delicate green jasmine tea. The leaves are coiled into small loose balls (about 3/16" diameter) that unfurl in the pot, and it is brewed gently with water just off the boil. Absolutely no bitterness but a pronounced flowery quality.Please do tell where I can find that tea! The very best jasmine tea we had was at a little Chinese restaurant that had decent food, but was not in a good location and lasted less than a year IIRC. The most spectacular thing about eating there, though, was their jasmine tea. The proprietor would not tell me anything about its source, but after much persuasion and multiple meals there she put some in a little plastic bag for me to take home and make a couple of cups worth.

annc
01-09-2006, 12:19 PM
Never thought of adding bitters to lime and soda, I would have thought that would spoil the lime - but then I'm a sucker for lime. Virgin Mary - new to me but I guess it's a de-vodka'd Bloody Mary? What an immaculate conception... :)Soda and lime made with lime cordial is actually better with the bitters added, in my view. ;)

And yes, a Virgin Mary is a de-vodka'd Bloody Mary.

terrie
01-09-2006, 04:29 PM
elyse: Please do tell where I can find that tea!Try Upton Tea (http://uptontea.com/shopcart/home.asp?UTid=211-20-1009897&afterCart=/shopcart/home.asp&)...I'll bet they'd have the good stuff...wonderful place and fab catalogue...

Terrie

Franca
01-09-2006, 11:27 PM
Yep, I have some lovely "gunpowder" jasmine tea I got from Upton. I like it plain but I will also sometimes drop a few little balls of it into a second or third steeping of my favorite black teas. Yummy both ways.

ktinkel
01-10-2006, 05:16 AM
Please do tell where I can find that tea! It came from an old Connecticut company in Brookfield called Simpson & Vail. Here is a link to their jasmine tea page (http://www.svtea.com/jasmine.asp). The one we have is the first one listed there, but a couple of the others look interesting as well.

I had never heard of this company, but our friends live in the next town and took their folks there for an outing, and they brought us the tea. The company sells by mail.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-10-2006, 06:03 AM
>>doctor's orders

Mine are different as to details; I am also off alcohol, however, since I am taking heavy-duty pain meds for a herniated disk.

Coffee works for me . . .

I don't know which icons to push right now--I manually deleted all but the two words above; the date above appears to indicate that I have been away from this Forum for nearly a year!

ElyseC
01-10-2006, 09:02 AM
It came from an old Connecticut company in Brookfield called Simpson & Vail. Here is a link to their jasmine tea page (http://www.svtea.com/jasmine.asp). The one we have is the first one listed there, but a couple of the others look interesting as well.Oo! Indeed they do look interesting! The have many nice-looking teapots, as well!

ktinkel
01-10-2006, 11:02 AM
I don't know which icons to push right now--I manually deleted all but the two words above …The easiest (and best, technically) way to quote here is to click the Quote button (instead of Quick Reply); then the text of the message you are replying to appears in the window, and you can edit out any you do not need.

Then just start typing your reply (on the same line, right after the /quote in square brackets) and it will look like this message.

You may need to adjust your User CP and thread view options for all this to be possible. Let us know what works and what doesn’t for you and we can help.

… the date above appears to indicate that I have been away from this Forum for nearly a year!It does. Funny, I was thinking about you just the other day, wondering where you were. Nice to have you back.

Sorry about your back problem. I have spent the past year in lower-back hell myself. Sucks, doesn’t it?

Franca
01-10-2006, 12:08 PM
And here is the page with Jasmine teas (http://www.uptontea.com/shopcart/catalog.asp?begin=0&parent=Teas%3EGreen%3EChina&category=Jasmine+and+Scented) in the Upton catalog. I can't remember off the top of my head if I've currently got the China Jasmine Pearls or the Jasmine Dragon Phoenix Pearl.

This is a great tea catalog to browse - lots of info about the teas and they also have nice tea "accessories". :) And ... of less importance to me than their customer service (which is outstanding) and the quality and selection of their teas ... but their prices are very reasonable.

ktinkel
01-10-2006, 12:56 PM
And here is the page with Jasmine teas (http://www.uptontea.com/shopcart/catalog.asp?begin=0&parent=Teas%3EGreen%3EChina&category=Jasmine+and+Scented) in the Upton catalog.Nice — lots more jasmines, too.

Thanks for pointing out that page. I had been lazy. Until last week, it never ever occurred to me that there was all this fancy tea action in the world!

terrie
01-10-2006, 01:25 PM
Thanks for finding the jasmine tea page at Upton Franca! I was rushing last night and didn't do a search...I love Upton's...they are the nicest people to work with and their teas are outstanding...it's so nice to be able to order loose tea...I love that you can personalize the tea labels on an order...makes me feel decadent...'-}}

Terrie

ktinkel
01-10-2006, 01:35 PM
… makes me feel decadent...'-}}Gasp! You mean you’re not decadent? ;)

terrie
01-10-2006, 02:05 PM
ROFL!!! Not hardly...'-}}

Terrie

annc
01-10-2006, 02:25 PM
Coffee works for me . . . That sounds like a good idea for winter, Carol. I'll remember that if I'm still off alcohol in June or July!

I have been away from this Forum for nearly a year!And you have been missed! Great to see you back.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-11-2006, 04:32 AM
The easiest (and best, technically) way to quote here is to click the Quote button (instead of Quick Reply); then the text of the message you are replying to appears in the window, and you can edit out any you do not need.

Then just start typing your reply (on the same line, right after the /quote in square brackets) and it will look like this message.

You may need to adjust your User CP and thread view options
Don't know what User CP is, or how to access . . .

I've been thinking about you folks, too . . . obviously, since I decided to check back in, and yes, the back problem sucks.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-11-2006, 04:37 AM
The easiest (and best, technically) way to quote here is to click the Quote button (instead of Quick Reply); then the text of the message you are replying to appears in the window, and you can edit out any you do not need.

Then just start typing your reply (on the same line, right after the /quote in square brackets) and it will look like this message.
Hee-hee! That really worked! <vbg>

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-11-2006, 04:58 AM
That sounds like a good idea for winter I put ice in coffee when cold seems appropriate, do fresh or heat stuff standing in the pot in the microwave, and also settle for room temperature with or without a shot of bourbon or rum or Buttershots etc. Also make choices regarding full, partial, and no caffeine, and add plain and flavored creamers.

And if I'm really back, it's because I've been missing myself as well! . . . which seems like a good cue to trying clicking on one of the emoticons to my right, i.e. and herewith--ta-da!:
:confused: (as well as :cool: and :rolleyes:)

ktinkel
01-11-2006, 05:14 AM
Hee-hee! That really worked! <vbg>Whew! See — it’s not so hard, right? ;)

annc
01-11-2006, 10:51 AM
...which seems like a good cue to trying clicking on one of the emoticons to my right, i.e. and herewith--ta-da!:
:confused: (as well as :cool: and :rolleyes:)LOL! They are cute, aren't they? I was dead set against them in the beginning, but discovered one day that I found the plain text ones too wishy-washy, and became hooked on these. This http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/eek.gif is my favourite, I think.

Nick Parkin
01-12-2006, 01:23 AM
You didn't say what you would normally drink, but the replies here have covered some excellent angles. I would add shloer a fruit drink (http://www.shloer.com/) which was a great substitute for white wine 20 years ago. I foreswore alcohol-free drinks back then for health reasons, but I see from their website that they have produced more flavours.

Another warning about the unhealthy effects of dropping alcohol - the worst hangover I ever had came from drinking alcohol free beer (the type where they brew the beer & then remove the alcohol). Apparently the beer still has all the nasties (Aldehydes & the like), but not the painkilling benefit of the alcohol.

You have been warned :evil:



I'm under doctor's orders to avoid alcohol for two months, and possibly forever. So I need to find something to sip of an evening, and when I go to the pub or a restaurant with friends..

annc
01-12-2006, 02:07 AM
You didn't say what you would normally drink, but the replies here have covered some excellent angles. I would add shloer a fruit drink (http://www.shloer.com/) which was a great substitute for white wine 20 years ago. I foreswore alcohol-free drinks back then for health reasons, but I see from their website that they have produced more flavours.They look very interesting, Nick. I wonder if they're made here under licence. Will check the web and see, I think. The flavours look interesting.

Another warning about the unhealthy effects of dropping alcohol - the worst hangover I ever had came from drinking alcohol free beer (the type where they brew the beer & then remove the alcohol). Apparently the beer still has all the nasties (Aldehydes & the like), but not the painkilling benefit of the alcohol.Ugh! All the pain with none of the pleasure. I'll keep that well in mind.

Thanks for the advice.

Nick Parkin
01-12-2006, 02:30 AM
I had assumed that it was a German drink (the UK not being famous for grape production, & the name having a tutonic ring) - but having looked into it ...... it's Spanish Grapes made to a Swiss Dr.'s recipe in the UK, & it doesn't look as if it is exported. Sorry.

N

annc
01-12-2006, 02:40 AM
I had assumed that it was a German drink (the UK not being famous for grape production, & the name having a tutonic ring) - but having looked into it ...... it's Spanish Grapes made to a Swiss Dr.'s recipe in the UK, & it doesn't look as if it is exported. Sorry.Never mind; it looks really interesting, so maybe I'll hve to visit the UK to try it some time.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-12-2006, 04:56 AM
Whew! See — it’s not so hard, right? ;) Easy enough to give it another try today
;)

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-12-2006, 05:03 AM
LOL! They are cute, aren't they? I was dead set against them in the beginning, but discovered one day that I found the plain text ones too wishy-washy, and became hooked on these. This http://desktoppublishingforum.com/bb/images/smilies/eek.gif is my favourite, I think. EEK is good <g>.

Today when I moved the cursor over to the Smilies I couldn't find the position that gave me the names of the icons ( :confused: ).

Franca
01-12-2006, 09:22 AM
I would add shloer a fruit drink (http://www.shloer.com/) which was a great substitute for white wine 20 years ago.That looks interesting! Pity it doesn't seem to be exported to the U.S. I'd like to look at the ingredients on the label. My usual concern with drinks like these is excessive sweetness. But I guess I'll have to wait for my next trip across the Atlantic to try it!

I foreswore alcohol-free drinks back then for health reasons.LOL!

You have been warned :evil:You're going to be a terrible influence. Which means, of course, that you'll fit right in. :D (Welcome, Nick!)

annc
01-12-2006, 12:37 PM
Today when I moved the cursor over to the Smilies I couldn't find the position that gave me the names of the icons ( :confused: ).Maybe you need to hover a little longer...

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-14-2006, 04:48 AM
Maybe you need to hover a little longer... Actually, what I need are instructions on how to get into the Forum without having to type in my name and password each time. Is that possible?

ktinkel
01-14-2006, 06:35 AM
Actually, what I need are instructions on how to get into the Forum without having to type in my name and password each time. Is that possible?How do you come here? What browser do you use?

I have Firefox and Safari set up to log me in automatically, but I also do not formally log out, so one way or another, never notice my coming and going. But tell me how you are getting in and I (or someone cleverer) will help you work this out.

Richard Waller
01-14-2006, 11:34 PM
If you have cookies enabled there should be no problem.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-17-2006, 04:13 AM
How do you come here? What browser do you use? I still primarily use Compuserve, but today I've tried using Mozilla. It got me here, but I still had to type in my user name and password.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-17-2006, 04:25 AM
If you have cookies enabled there should be no problem. Alas, this forces me to admit that I have no idea what a cookie is or what it does . . . I'm a (currently blocked) writer and former editor who never did manage to keep up with the technology.

ktinkel
01-17-2006, 11:27 AM
Alas, this forces me to admit that I have no idea what a cookie is or what it does . . . I'm a (currently blocked) writer and former editor who never did manage to keep up with the technology.In most browsers cookies are enabled by default. So if you never turned them off, they are probably on.

If you start worrying about them, you can look at the list and delete some of them — I do that periodically, getting rid of any that seem to be about advertising.

But if you delete all of them, you will have to log in wherever you go until new cookies are set.

terrie
01-17-2006, 01:10 PM
sturmella: Actually, what I need are instructions on how to get into the Forum without having to type in my name and password each time. Is that possible?I could have sworn that I posted the following to you but now I don't see my post so I'll try again...

Try coming in via the website portal (http://desktoppublishingforum.com/) and then clicking on the "Discussion Forum" link. That's the way I come in and it always "sees" me as logged in.

Also, don't log out when you leave the forum...just close the forum's browser window...

Hope that helps...

Terrie

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-18-2006, 08:50 AM
In most browsers cookies are enabled by default. So if you never turned them off, they are probably on.

If you start worrying about them, you can look at the list and delete some of them . Where would I look for them, and what would I be looking for?

And btw, today (after a _long_ morning of no electricity thanks to a heavy storm) I _didn't_ have to log in . . . so thanks for solving that problem!

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-18-2006, 08:56 AM
Try coming in via the website portal (http://desktoppublishingforum.com/) and then clicking on the "Discussion Forum" link. That's the way I come in and it always "sees" me as logged in.

Also, don't log out when you leave the forum...just close the forum's browser window...

Hope that helps...

Terrie Thanks, Terri . . . I'll try that tomorrow when I'll have a bit more time. Today's been shot with a major power outage and a blocked driveway that has me hustling now with a rearranged schedule!

terrie
01-18-2006, 02:14 PM
kt: If you start worrying about them, you can look at the list and delete some of them — I do that periodically, getting rid of any that seem to be about advertising.I have my cookies.txt file (for Netscape) set to read-only and only unckeck that when I know I want/need a cookie set--for example for my bank--and then re-check read-only.

Cookies expiration dates are usually so far in the future that I've not had problems with the read-only setting.

The only time I ever get hits in Spybot Search and Destroy and/or Ad-Aware is when my cookies.txt file has not been set to read-only--for example, when I've turned read-only off to get a cookie set for a site I need and forget to reset read-only and go browsing round the web for stuff...

Terrie

terrie
01-18-2006, 02:15 PM
sturmella: Thanks, Terri . . . I'll try that tomorrow when I'll have a bit more time.You're welcome...let me know if that works for you...


>>Today's been shot with a major power outage and a blocked driveway that has me hustling now with a rearranged schedule!

UGH!!!

Terrie

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-19-2006, 04:57 AM
I have my cookies.txt file (for Netscape) set to read-only and only unckeck that when I know I want/need a cookie set--for example for my bank--and then re-check read-only. Terrie Okay . . . and I've discovered that in the Mozilla bar at the top under Tools there's a section Cookies. What exactly is a Cookie, and what do they do? Thanks in advance for your 101 patience! <wg>

Rik Bean
01-19-2006, 05:06 AM
What exactly is a Cookie, and what do they do?

Cookies are small files placed on your machine by web sites. Most, as in the case of this site, are harmless and are used to recognise you next time you visit. Some, however, are used to track your movements on the web and are a form of spyware. It's worth clearing those from your machine, if you're running Windows there's a variety of programs on offer to do the job, if you're on a Mac someone else will need to advise. Of the Windows apps available, I recommend Webroot's Windows Washer.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-19-2006, 05:18 AM
You're welcome...let me know if that works for you... It does indeed!!!! :)


>>Today's been shot with a major power outage and a blocked driveway that has me hustling now with a rearranged schedule!

UGH!!!

Terrie Ugh, indeed. The power company cut out and removed the center section of the tree that was blocking the drive and gerry-rigged a temporary support for the downed wires, but there were so many downed trees in the area yesterday due to the storm (heavy heavy rain and wind gusts up to 50 mph) that it will be at least a week until the rest of the debris is removed. Luckily the drive itself didn't completely wash out, and we've been enjoying a stretch of unusually warm weather for January so avoided snow . . . although my hyacinths and some of the other bulbs are already several inches up through the ground a couple of months early and if the weather turns cold again they won't flower. Ah, well . . . I guess I'd rather have that then being snowed in again as we were early in December before winter officially arrived.

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-19-2006, 05:27 AM
Cookies are small files placed on your machine by web sites. Most, as in the case of this site, are harmless and are used to recognise you next time you visit. Some, however, are used to track your movements on the web and are a form of spyware. It's worth clearing those from your machine, if you're running Windows there's a variety of programs on offer to do the job, if you're on a Mac someone else will need to advise. Of the Windows apps available, I recommend Webroot's Windows Washer. Thanks!!!!

I am on a Mac, however (iMac running System 10.2.8 except when I go into Word when it goes back to System 9 . . . which is a pain because it means rebooting sometimes to do other things).

And hello; I'm fairly certain we haven't spoken before!

Rik Bean
01-19-2006, 06:19 AM
Thanks!!!!

I am on a Mac, however (iMac running System 10.2.8 except when I go into Word when it goes back to System 9 . . . which is a pain because it means rebooting sometimes to do other things).

And hello; I'm fairly certain we haven't spoken before!

How right you are. :)

Greetings, I'm just an old reprobate, now retired, but persuaded by my friends from the days of Compuserve to loiter and foist the odd terrible pun on people...

dthomsen8
01-19-2006, 07:01 AM
Alas, this forces me to admit that I have no idea what a cookie is or what it does . . . I'm a (currently blocked) writer and former editor who never did manage to keep up with the technology.

http://www.kolias.com/computers/cookies.htm

has a good explanation of cookies, although they are not quite so benign as their description might lead you to believe.

terrie
01-19-2006, 08:55 AM
sturmella: It does indeed!!!! :)Oh yay!!!! I have my browser set to to remember url's entered so normally I just have to begin typing "desk..." and the url pops up...


>>that it will be at least a week until the rest of the debris is removed. Luckily the drive itself didn't completely wash out, and we've been enjoying a stretch of unusually warm weather for January so avoided snow . . .

Where are you? I'm in northern VA (outside Washington, DC) and we've had a stretch of warm weather too...


>>I guess I'd rather have that then being snowed in again as we were early in December before winter officially arrived.

Yeah...we had early snow also...it was my fault because I hadn't had the anti-snowballing pads put on my horse's feet--you know...kind of like carrying an umbrella so it doesn't rain...'-}}--the warm weather and rain seem to have coincided with the pads being put on so that's working...'-}}

Terrie

PS...I see that Rik explained about cookies...

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-21-2006, 05:35 AM
How right you are. :)

Greetings, I'm just an old reprobate, now retired, but persuaded by my friends from the days of Compuserve to loiter and foist the odd terrible pun on people... I'll catch up on that in a different thread I know you've begun in this section (she says with a flirtatious ;)).

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-21-2006, 05:41 AM
http://www.kolias.com/computers/cookies.htm

has a good explanation of cookies, although they are not quite so benign as their description might lead you to believe. Thank you, thank you!! And I've actually managed to "bookmark" the site to get back to when the time is required.

All best,
Carol

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-21-2006, 05:57 AM
Where are you? New Jersey . . . near Trenton, Princeton, and a bend in the Delaware River allowing bridge access to Pennsylvania. In a five-year-old house that shares part of a common driveway with wonderful neighbors who board horses. And thanks for reminding me that you were near D.C. (:o) although I did remember that you were one of the "horse ladies"!

Carol

terrie
01-21-2006, 01:07 PM
sturmella: New Jersey . . . near Trenton, Princeton, and a bend in the Delaware River allowing bridge access to Pennsylvania.I didn't realize that you guys had had such a bad storm....I thought that maybe you were out west someplace...


>>In a five-year-old house that shares part of a common driveway with wonderful neighbors who board horses.

Ohhhh...how loverly!!! Nothing better than seeing horses out your windows...'-}}


>>although I did remember that you were one of the "horse ladies"!

'-}}

Terrie

Rik Bean
01-22-2006, 01:29 AM
I'll catch up on that in a different thread I know you've begun in this section (she says with a flirtatious ;)).

It's not often I get a flirtatious smiley these days... :)

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-24-2006, 04:42 AM
It's not often I get a flirtatious smiley these days... :) Glad to have given you a surprise, then!

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-24-2006, 04:51 AM
Nothing better than seeing horses out your windows...'-}}
Terrie The neighbor's have permission to ride on our land anytime so long as they call first to let us know, but most often they use a trail we don't see from the house; what we do see every day are way too many deer!

Rik Bean
01-25-2006, 12:50 AM
Glad to have given you a surprise, then!

Surprise? My gast was flabbered! ;)

Sturmella Carol Beaumont
01-25-2006, 05:49 AM
Surprise? My gast was flabbered! ;) Normally I'd suggest bourbon or rum or a tot of Buttershots or Hennessey for that condition, but considering the original message in this thread, perhaps Alka-Seltzer is a better bet.

Molly/CA
01-25-2006, 09:15 AM
Painful as it is to pay the bar price, there's a lot to be said for plain ol' fizzy mineral water with a twist. Some bars will give you soda water instead of something out of an imported bottle, for less.

I long ago started putting fizzy mineral water on the table at meals, in hope of saving my husband's liver for a while yet. It's also quite satisfying as a wine/beer substitute at meals, once you get used to it.

I quit drinking for several years because the book that saved my sanity and maybe life said that the first thing you had to do to deal with an alcoholic was to quit drinking yourself. The first three days were hard --I really wanted that glass of vermouth or that martini I was used to drinking while I fixed dinner. But after that, and by making sure I had something else to swallow --mineral water usually-- it was no problem, especially since I immediately began feeling much better physically and so much less trapped and helpless about the situation.

Molly/CA
01-25-2006, 09:22 AM
Oh, I cut the losing weight part from my message! It helps a LOT if like me only your inhibitions keep you from eating everything in the house including the walls. It's a double whammy if you go to mineral water rather than drinks with sugar and/or caffeine, you save the alcohol calories too.

My inhibitions are evidently the only thing keeping me awake, too, which also helps lose weight, if you're doing something other than going right to sleep after dinner. (I'll talk myself into not drinking again if I keep this up!) Alcohol disturbs your sleep patterns and --maybe because I was drinking a lot more than was good for me during the Bad Years -- it takes only a little bit now to screw up my sleep. Such as it is at best.

Molly/CA
01-25-2006, 09:31 AM
When you go to a Korean restaurant, they serve you a drink made by simmering roasted grain --barley or mixed grains-- , warm in winter, cold sometimes in summer. The Oriental markets around here have roasted grains loose and often in giant teabags. I've been keeping a kettle of it simmering on the woodstove so I don't get the caffeine shakes etc. --I can only tolerate the amount in one big mug of very strong black tea with milk, first thing in the morning. I've also had Rooibush/ redbush/ Kaffir tea (non politically correct term) that tasted at least as good as most real tea. There's a great difference between brands --this came from England, don't know the brand.

Don't know if it's the shaky feeling too much caffeine gives me or if it really causes a blood sugar drop, but coffee, especially, makes me want to eat (everything makes me want to eat, including the act of eating) too.

annc
01-25-2006, 11:52 AM
Oh, I cut the losing weight part from my message! It helps a LOT if like me only your inhibitions keep you from eating everything in the house including the walls. It's a double whammy if you go to mineral water rather than drinks with sugar and/or caffeine, you save the alcohol calories too.It's been three and a half weeks now, and I haven't lost a single gram! I am drinking soda, lime and bitters most nights (hope the little alcohol in the bitters is allowed). I did read somewhere once that the calories in alcohol don't convert to fat in the body, and that the extra weight people gain while drinking is from the salty snacks they consume while drinking. But that was probably aimed at the Australian beer drinking male.

My inhibitions are evidently the only thing keeping me awake, too, which also helps lose weight, if you're doing something other than going right to sleep after dinner. (I'll talk myself into not drinking again if I keep this up!) Alcohol disturbs your sleep patterns and --maybe because I was drinking a lot more than was good for me during the Bad Years -- it takes only a little bit now to screw up my sleep. Such as it is at best.My sleep patterns have changed dramatically. As you say, I no longer fall asleep immediately after dinner, and don't have that regular 2 a.m. wakeful period that often used to last until my normal getting up time at 4.30 to 5.30.

BUT! I now find that I am so alert in the evening that I often work like a beaver at the computer until after midnight, and have to force myself to go to bed then. I still wake up once for a toilet break (damn fluid tablets, and cholesterol tablet that I take at bedtime, with a glass of water) but go straight back to sleep. However, I still wake up between 4 and 5, as I have done for 35 years or more, courtesy of the need to tend to horses before travelling long distances to work, for many, many years.

annc
01-25-2006, 11:58 AM
Don't know if it's the shaky feeling too much caffeine gives me or if it really causes a blood sugar drop, but coffee, especially, makes me want to eat (everything makes me want to eat, including the act of eating) too.My cure for that is to have an iced coffee when I go out to lunch. It fills me up so much that all I can bear to eat with it is a small sandwich. And the local café I frequent does a really nice iced coffee.