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marlene
12-30-2005, 03:38 PM
The Washington Post's December 28th food section ran an article entitled "A New Year's Supper for 20: The Best of Old and New" with recipes:

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2005/12/27/AR2005122700207.html

The highlight (or nadir, depending on your point of view) is a recipe on the last page for Krispy Kreme Chocolate Icebox Bombe.

Okay, who's gonna try it? KT?

Too bad the Post web site didn't include the photo that was in the printed section!

mxh

ktinkel
12-31-2005, 05:46 AM
The highlight (or nadir, depending on your point of view) is a recipe on the last page for Krispy Kreme Chocolate Icebox Bombe.

Okay, who's gonna try it? KT?Huh? Me? You gotta be kidding. I am a lousy dessert cook in any event (I can’t even seem to make edible chocolate chip cookies!)

And then Krispy Kreme is too revolting even to contemplate playing with. But do report back if you try it, will you? <g>

In your honor, btw, we bought a box of Mallomars at the market the other day. I had seen a little story in the newspaper about how the Mallomar season was open, so when I saw them in the Nabisco section, why, it seemed like kismet …

terrie
12-31-2005, 02:04 PM
marlene: The highlight (or nadir, depending on your point of view) is a recipe on the last page for Krispy Kreme Chocolate Icebox Bombe.I saw that and thought...ugh!

I have a lovely piece freshly made baklava as a treat for myself tonight courtesy of Zo's barn owner...'-}}

Terrie

marlene
01-01-2006, 12:38 AM
But do report back if you try it, will you?

Chances are slim to none! If I ever got motivated enough to cook something, it wouldn't have donuts as an ingredient. I do like a good donut once in a while, but I don't adulterate them. <g>

In your honor, btw, we bought a box of Mallomars at the market the other day.

I spotted and bagged my first Mallomars of the season a couple of days ago (although the Washington Post did not announce the opening of Mallomar season). Broke them open tonight in honor of New Year's Eve. I read somewhere that Nabisco might tamper with the chocolate formula so they can distribute Mallomars all year round. I don't like the sound of that. If they do something to keep the chocolate from blooming, I assume it will change the flavor and/or consistency. Grrrr.

Here's another recipe I'm never gonna try:

http://www.kraftfoods.com/recipes/CakesPiesCheesecakes/CheesecakesBaked/MallomarCheesecake.html

And this one looks even worse:

http://www.kraftfoods.com/recipes/Breads/SweetRolls/MALLOMARStickyBuns.html

Salon.com has a mildly interesting piece about Mallomars:

http://www.salon.com/mwt/sust/2001/02/27/mallomars/?sid=1015229

mxh

mxh

marlene
01-01-2006, 12:40 AM
But wasn't the photo nice? You couldn't tell that the dessert was made of donuts.

I'd never fuss with anything that complicated, anyway. Especially on New Year's Eve. I had a freshly opened box of Mallomars as my late-night treat. <g>

mxh

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 07:21 AM
I read somewhere that Nabisco might tamper with the chocolate formula so they can distribute Mallomars all year round. I don't like the sound of that. If they do something to keep the chocolate from blooming, I assume it will change the flavor and/or consistency. Grrrr.

Salon.com has a mildly interesting piece about Mallomars The recipes you linked to are beyond revolting. Yuck.

I broke open our package of Mallomars this morning and had one with my coffee. I was pleasantly surprised at the cracker part, which I remember as being more cardboardy. The chocolate and marshmallow are perfectly balanced, however.

There is supposedly a Canadian lookalike that has about double the calory and fat count and is much admired up north, but I don’t think I have ever seen it, and don’t remember its name.

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 07:26 AM
I have a lovely piece freshly made baklava as a treat for myself tonight courtesy of Zo's barn owner...'-}}Homemade baklava, yum. That sounds divine.

We have a friend whose mother was Armenian and a wonderful cook, and she used to bake trays and trays of baklava at Christmas time. Really wonderful.

She used to make another wonderful dish called boereg (there are other spellings): savory cheese and butter turnover-like thing with a pastry crust. To die for. Maybe of, if you eat enough of them — definitely ultra rich.

Since his mother died, Frank makes baklava occasionally, but not boereg. Alas.

marlene
01-01-2006, 10:10 AM
I was pleasantly surprised at the cracker part, which I remember as being more cardboardy.

I always thought the cookie/cracker part was a vanilla wafer, but most web references say it's a graham cracker. Maybe tonight I'll remember to carefully nibble off the chocolate and inspect the cracker to determine what it really is.

Canadian lookalike

Those might be the Dare "Whippets":

http://www.darefoodsinc.com/products/cookies/whippet.html

I bought them once when I found them on sale at the local grocery store, and they were actually very good. I didn't look at the nutritional information, though. <g>

mxh

ktinkel
01-01-2006, 10:31 AM
Those might be the Dare "Whippets":

I bought them once when I found them on sale at the local grocery store, and they were actually very good. I didn't look at the nutritional information, though. <g>Maybe so, though those are lower in fat and calories than Mallowmars, and the article I read said it was the other way around. (And the Dare cookies have the dread partially hydrogenated oils.)

Raspberry jam sounds nice.

Cristen Gillespie
01-02-2006, 08:07 AM
Homemade baklava, yum. That sounds divine.

We have a friend whose mother was Armenian and a wonderful cook, and she used to bake trays and trays of baklava at Christmas time. Really wonderful.

She used to make another wonderful dish called boereg (there are other spellings): savory cheese and butter turnover-like thing with a pastry crust. To die for. Maybe of, if you eat enough of them — definitely ultra rich.

Since his mother died, Frank makes baklava occasionally, but not boereg. Alas.

Baklava is fun and easy, but you definitely need at least a dozen friends on the premises to consume it! I have a recipe somewhere for Burek, sounds a lot like what your friend made. It's phyllo layers with cream cheese and spinach, seasoned, sandwiched between. Delicious warm or cold. I'm trying to sort through recipe books, find my favorites, so I can get rid of some old, seldom-used books to make room for the new. Should be familiar to you<BG>

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 08:15 AM
I have a recipe somewhere for Burek, sounds a lot like what your friend made. It's phyllo layers with cream cheese and spinach, seasoned, sandwiched between. Delicious warm or cold.Sounds close. She did not include spinach, but the idea is the same. (Every middle-eastern culture and all their sub-cultures have the same dishes, but different! Mostly good, regardless of the details.

I'm trying to sort through recipe books, find my favorites, so I can get rid of some old, seldom-used books to make room for the new. Should be familiar to you<BG>Um, well, sort of. I never get rid of any — just buy more shelves.

Except for old computer books. Those I do [well, plan to] get rid of. Nothing less useful under the sun, really!

terrie
01-02-2006, 02:39 PM
kt: Homemade baklava, yum. That sounds divine.It was absolutely fab...I'm going to see if she will give me another piece...I had it with a very tiny split (I think that's what you call it) of sparkling wine my next door neighbor gave me for new year--I think I'm correct in thinking that one can't call something "champagne" if it's not from France???

Anyway...the wine was quite nice too...I'm not a big drinker but this was very pleasant...


>>She used to make another wonderful dish called boereg (there are other spellings): savory cheese and butter turnover-like thing with a pastry crust. To die for. Maybe of, if you eat enough of them — definitely ultra rich.

Sounds wonderful...

Terrie

ktinkel
01-02-2006, 04:14 PM
It was absolutely fab...I'm going to see if she will give me another piece...I had it with a very tiny split (I think that's what you call it) of sparkling wine my next door neighbor gave me for new year--I think I'm correct in thinking that one can't call something "champagne" if it's not from France??? Well, if it is French, they can only call it champagne if it comes from the specific Champagne region. Otherwise they call it blanc-de-noirs or cramante or other things, and some of that may (or may not) be wonderful.

In the U.S. (and other countries) we can do whatever we feel like doing since we are not subject to French law. But here we have pretty much stopped calling local sparkling wines “champagne” (perhaps because our wine-makers have relationships with the French), but there are some very nice American sparkling wines. Maybe not from Gallo, but others.

And some of my favorites comes from Italy, which calls its sparklers Proseco, which can be divine. (But avoid Asti Spumante, which is cloyingly sweet and lacking in personality.)

I love sparkling wine, myself. I do not worry too much about pedigree, but like a dry wine with character and a tiny bubble. There is hardly anything as appealing as a nice-tasting sparkling wine!

terrie
01-03-2006, 04:00 PM
kt: but there are some very nice American sparkling wines. Maybe not from Gallo, but others.This was Mumm's I think...it was dry (I like a dry wine myself) and the bubble was small...I'm going to see if I can find a larger bottle of it...have to ask my neighbor where she bought it...

Terrie

Cristen Gillespie
01-04-2006, 08:11 AM
Sounds close. She did not include spinach, but the idea is the same. (Every middle-eastern culture and all their sub-cultures have the same dishes, but different! Mostly good, regardless of the details.

Um, well, sort of. I never get rid of any — just buy more shelves.

Except for old computer books. Those I do [well, plan to] get rid of. Nothing less useful under the sun, really!

You don't feel guilty when you see a poor, lonely cookbook, its pages too long closed? <G> I'm feeling guilty just going through some of my old books, so guilty it's looking harder than when I started to get rid of the poor dears. They deserve more attention than I've been paying them. I know it's time for a new owner, someone who might make more than 3 recipes from the hundreds in the book, though I try to tell myself somehow *I'll* manage to make them myself. I know I won't.