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dthomsen8
12-29-2005, 03:35 PM
Yes, I understand that packaging for computer gadgets has to deter theft, but do they really have to be so tough to get into, even with a box knife?

I finally got my Memorex MiniTravelDrive out of the box, along with the instructions, but it was a struggle. The travel strap is still in the package.

ktinkel
12-29-2005, 05:30 PM
I finally got my Memorex MiniTravelDrive out of the box, along with the instructions, but it was a struggle. The travel strap is still in the package.It’s not just computer stuff — pill bottles, CD wrappings, even cereal boxes (“to open, slide finger under flap” — yeah, right; the whole thing rips off!).

Robin Springall
12-29-2005, 05:33 PM
LOL! Yes, I quite agree - in my case it was a USB card reader. The packaging was totally wrecked by the time I managed to get the damn thing out, so when I found that it didn't take the XD card that my Mum's camera uses, I couldn't even return it!

Actually, do be careful of this with card readers if you use an XD card: it has the same connector as the SD variety, the same width, but half the length. So you push the thing right into the reader, then try and get it back out!...

ktinkel
12-29-2005, 06:01 PM
Actually, do be careful of this with card readers if you use an XD card: it has the same connector as the SD variety, the same width, but half the length. So you push the thing right into the reader, then try and get it back out!...Oh, yes — I have one of those, too.

Brilliant industrial design, huh?

Richard Waller
12-30-2005, 06:02 AM
It’s not just computer stuff Our local grocer delivers to old folk around the village and while unpacking the stuff, loosens the tops of things that the customer is going to have difficulty with. Me? I give it to the dog who tears the wrapping apart with his teeth.

ktinkel
12-30-2005, 08:08 AM
Our local grocer delivers to old folk around the village and while unpacking the stuff, loosens the tops of things that the customer is going to have difficulty with. Me? I give it to the dog who tears the wrapping apart with his teeth.Not sure which solution has fewer potential problems, but both sound interesting.

Does your dog always stop with the wrapping? Very well-trained dog!

Michael Rowley
12-30-2005, 09:45 AM
'even with a box knife'

Er . . . what is a box knife? (I've heard of a knife box.)

annc
12-30-2005, 12:06 PM
'even with a box knife'

Er . . . what is a box knife? (I've heard of a knife box.)I gather (courtesy of 9/11) that a box cutter or box knife is the American equivalent of a Stanley knife.

Franca
12-30-2005, 12:44 PM
Indeed, I regularly complain about packaging these days. However, the worst is that completely sealed, molded hard plastic that computer-related things come in. The only way to get into it is with a dangerously sharp implement. Inevitably I cut it on two or three sides expecting to be able to bend or tear it away to get at the "prize" but the stuff does not bend, and has an edge even more dangerous than the implement used to cut into it. So then I have to cut all the way around the gadget and hope that I can pull the plastic apart without shedding any blood. If somebody knows a better way to get into this type of packaging, please let me know!

annc
12-30-2005, 01:59 PM
Indeed, I regularly complain about packaging these days. However, the worst is that completely sealed, molded hard plastic that computer-related things come in. The only way to get into it is with a dangerously sharp implement. Inevitably I cut it on two or three sides expecting to be able to bend or tear it away to get at the "prize" but the stuff does not bend, and has an edge even more dangerous than the implement used to cut into it. So then I have to cut all the way around the gadget and hope that I can pull the plastic apart without shedding any blood. If somebody knows a better way to get into this type of packaging, please let me know!I use the kitchen scissors on the plastic itself, but agree about the dangers imposed by the plastic edges afterwards.

And then, if the gadget isn't the right bit at the end of all the effort, you are stuck with it.

dthomsen8
12-30-2005, 03:50 PM
However, the worst is that completely sealed, molded hard plastic that computer-related things come in.

Franca! Right on! That stuff is the problem that made me start this thread.

dthomsen8
12-30-2005, 03:53 PM
'even with a box knife'

Er . . . what is a box knife? (I've heard of a knife box.)

Box knives are what the 9/11 hijackers used to overpower the flight crews. Knife blades in plastic, used to open cardboard boxes, but useful for other things, and unfortunately dangerous in the wrong hands. $1 for four at the dollar store. Does the pound store have them?

David

dthomsen8
12-30-2005, 03:56 PM
I gather (courtesy of 9/11) that a box cutter or box knife is the American equivalent of a Stanley knife.

Ah, but the Stanley tool knife is usually a fixed blade in a metal handle with a screw on the side. A box knife has a blade that can be extended, with slots cut in it to break off the point.

dthomsen8
12-30-2005, 04:00 PM
Box knives are what the 9/11 hijackers used to overpower the flight crews. Knife blades in plastic, used to open cardboard boxes, but useful for other things, and unfortunately dangerous in the wrong hands. $1 for four at the dollar store. Does the pound store have them?

David

Box cutter:

Robin Springall
12-31-2005, 04:23 AM
Luckily the Ultra 22-in-1 card reader only cost 7 quid, so I've put it down to experience. When I buy its replacement I'll check that it will support XD <sigh>.

ktinkel
12-31-2005, 05:37 AM
Indeed, I regularly complain about packaging these days. However, the worst is that completely sealed, molded hard plastic that computer-related things come in. Not quite as bad but equally annoying is the way cryovac meat products are packaged. The seal runs right against the food, so I always end up cutting off the edge of the beef or salami or whatever in order to get the thing to open. Then once it is cut, it curls up leaving grease and ooze everywhere. Makes me very cross.

As far as ordinary stuff is concerned, I keep a single-edge razor blade next to my every working area so I can slit tape and slice stuff that gets in my way. (Including the protective seal on medicine bottles — the only way I know how to get past that is to cut a big criss-cross across and pick off the pieces.)

Michael Rowley
12-31-2005, 07:39 AM
Ann:

'the American equivalent of a Stanley knife'

Ah, thought so. That is interesting, as I have sought a proper name for it for years. I wonder, is it the construction that is the source of the name, or what it is used for.

Franca
12-31-2005, 10:53 AM
Medicine bottle seals ... I finally determined that the best way to deal with those is to take the "wrong" end of a toothbrush (or other common bathroom implement) and simply punch through them. Same effect as making your cross with the razor blade but so much more gratifying. ;)

ElyseC
12-31-2005, 11:33 AM
Saw this gizmo, OpenX, (http://www.myopenx.com/home.htm) advertised once on TV a couple of weeks ago. Never saw the ad again, but have been determined to track it down. Your message reminded me to see what Google could find. Enjoy! :)

Heh, saw several sites quoting an Amazon.com customer comment (for something or other packaged in the hard plastic stuff we're all cursing) who said, "But whoever designed the hard plastic packaging should spend eternity in hell unwrapping these things." :D

annc
12-31-2005, 12:04 PM
Ann:

'the American equivalent of a Stanley knife'

Ah, thought so. That is interesting, as I have sought a proper name for it for years. I wonder, is it the construction that is the source of the name, or what it is used for.I got the impression when I first saw the term on 12th September 2001, that it was the use the tool was put to that generated the name, but I could be wrong.

Michael Rowley
12-31-2005, 02:34 PM
Ann:

'it was the use the tool was put to that generated the name'

It might have. But I think that Stanley knives were used for cutting open corrugated board cases in the early days.

Now that cut-throat razors are collectors' items, the gangs have long gone over to Stanley knives as a favourite offensive weapon.