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jwoolf09
12-10-2005, 12:50 PM
I need some help finding a very obscure font, please. I had it years ago, I think off a very old version of CorelDraw, but I've since lost the CDROM, and seem to have also lost the original .cdr for the graphic. All I have is this gif:

http://www.jwoolfden.com/gif/pdesert.gif


As best I can recall, it's supposed to look like wooden logs, and the name had some variant of "wood" or "log" in it. Possibly "log cabin." Repeated websearches have found nothing, and What's My Font? didn't find anything close.

Anyone know what this font is and where I could find it?

-- JSW

ktinkel
12-10-2005, 02:52 PM
Anyone know what this font is and where I could find it?No. Or not quite, anyway.

David Rakowski produced a font very like that called LowerEastSide. I have attached a specimen of that. It is the same idea, but different in many details.

Yours looks familiar, but I think it was a transfer or rubdown font that I am thinking of, not a desktop digital version, so even if I could remember the name, it might not be what your font was called. Anyway, I do not believe that one was like tree bark, more a neon effect.

Sorry not to be more help.

annc
12-10-2005, 03:22 PM
Your suggestion that it was a rub down font makes sense, actually – it would explain the slightly odd letter spacing.

bluemuse
12-10-2005, 04:29 PM
How about this?

http://www.fontpoint.com/freefont/neon-lights.htm

annc
12-10-2005, 05:09 PM
How about this?

http://www.fontpoint.com/freefont/neon-lights.htmSpot on. Well done!

ktinkel
12-10-2005, 05:25 PM
How about this?Excellent — that looks exactly like it.

Franca
12-12-2005, 09:47 AM
And welcome to the forum! :)

Norbert
12-13-2005, 10:02 AM
Yours looks familiar, but I think it was a transfer or rubdown font that I am thinking of, not a desktop digital version, so even if I could remember the name, it might not be what your font was called.

I'm not near my old resource books at the moment, but the typeface was originally known as "Quicksilver" and was available from either Letraset or Mecanorma in press-type (rub down) sheets, though the design may have been developed originally by Visual Graphics Corp. (VGC).

ktinkel
12-13-2005, 01:47 PM
… but the typeface was originally known as "Quicksilver" and was available from either Letraset or Mecanorma in press-type (rub down) sheets, though the design may have been developed originally by Visual Graphics Corp. (VGC).Bingo! I found it in the Letragraphica range in a Letraset catalog ca. 1987. Attributed to Dean Morris.

I had a small adventure when I tried to search for a digital version — the name has been used by Scriptorium for a disconnected script and by someone named Pizza Dude for a hard-edged gamers’ font. When I searched for Letraset Quicksilver, I found a cross-reference to Quantum, but when I went looking for Quantum, I found at least two of those, neither of them this font.

Someone did find a rough-looking share- or freeware version, but guess that’s it.

(Hi, Norbert! Delighted to see you here.)

Norbert
12-14-2005, 06:03 AM
Thank you, Kathleen. Delighted to be here.

ktinkel
12-14-2005, 09:47 AM
Thank you, Kathleen. Delighted to be here.Hope you won’t be a stranger.

ktinkel
12-14-2005, 10:13 AM
Anyone know what this font is and where I could find it?Some new information:

First, three different font utilities found that Neon font to be damaged. I found and downloaded it from two different servers, with the same result.

However, I also discovered that Quicksilver ITC was an early (pre-Bitstream) Corel font, bundled with Draw sometime after 1992. It may have had that name or [Corel] Quantum.

It would be so old that I suspect the software was delivered on floppies, not CD. I hope some of this helps you find your font.

BTW — it has really wretched spacing. I was itching to respace it!

Franca
12-14-2005, 11:26 AM
Some new information:

First, three different font utilities found that Neon font to be damaged. I found and downloaded it from two different servers, with the same result.

However, I also discovered that Quicksilver ITC was an early (pre-Bitstream) Corel font, bundled with Draw sometime after 1992. It may have had that name or [Corel] Quantum.

BTW — it has really wretched spacing. I was itching to respace it!Well, all of this piqued my interest. I went to look for Quicksilver on my system since I have most of the fonts that ever came bundled with Corel Draw. Sure enough, Quicksilver does appear in the list of fonts in Font Navigator. However, when I click on it, nothing shows up! So far it seems that this font in all of its various iterations is plagued by gremlins. :eek: When you mentioned funky spacing I was deeply suspicious and was prepared (if I found it) for it to display some weirdness or other. I wasn't quite expecting it to display nothing at all, but there you go ... it's dead, Jim. (Apologies to non-Star Trek fans.) This would seem to be a font to avoid.

jwoolf09
12-16-2005, 03:46 AM
However, I also discovered that Quicksilver ITC was an early (pre-Bitstream) Corel font, bundled with Draw sometime after 1992. It may have had that name or [Corel] Quantum.

It would be so old that I suspect the software was delivered on floppies, not CD. I hope some of this helps you find your font.

That's consistent: I remember finding that font on an old copy of CorelDraw -- version 3, I think. One of the first packages I remember buying on CD-ROM. The name "Quicksilver" isn't familiar, but it's more likely I would have looked at and used a font with that name than one called "Neon." On checking, I find that CorelGallery 3 includes a Quicksilver font, which isn't quite identical to the gif I posted, but is very similar.

Thanks all for the help!

ktinkel
12-16-2005, 08:19 AM
That's consistent: I remember finding that font on an old copy of CorelDraw -- version 3, I think. One of the first packages I remember buying on CD-ROM. The name "Quicksilver" isn't familiar, but it's more likely I would have looked at and used a font with that name than one called "Neon." On checking, I find that CorelGallery 3 includes a Quicksilver font, which isn't quite identical to the gif I posted, but is very similar.

Thanks all for the help!You’re welcome. Come back any time.

deanmorris_nyc
05-18-2007, 08:18 PM
I'm Dean Morris, the designer of the typeface "Quicksilver" that came out in 1976 as part of Letraset's Letragraphica range of rub-down fonts, the stylishly aggeressive ones in the yellow pages of the catalog.

I named the typeface "Quicksliver" because it looked like bent thermometers — quicksilver being a nickname for mercury (I never meant it to suggest neon), and because "Quicksilver" had some of the cooler letters such as Q, K, E, and R. The name was my second choice, however. Letraset Englishly felt that my first choice,
"Polished Sausage", would be "rather unpopular in foreign markets".

I designed it as a 16 year-old kid in John Glenn High School in Bay City, Michigan, and sent Letraset a xerox of a tight sketch of 3" letters kerned with the heavy outlines slightly overlapping as I originally intended. I drew only the skinny S without an alternate and submitted no punctuation (what did I know?).

Letraset must have wanted it real fast (disco was WHITE HOT then, remember), because they did the finished art themselves at 5" high (they can't have known my age, maybe they had no confidence in my technical talent), starting with the E as did I in the design stage. And what a gorgeous rendering job they did in the pre-Mac days of ruling pens, straightedges, and handdrawn curves (those aren't compass curves)!

Letraset stayed very close to my tight sketch, designed the punctuation, and suggested an alternate but weird wide S, which I approved, figuring there was probably no other decent way to design it. I imagined the punctuation would match the stroke width of the letters but they drew them narrower and slightly oddly, but I figured what the hell.

If you wondered, "What was I thinking?" when you looked at the A, B, E, F, K, N, Q, R, and Y, I'll tell you. I was simply trying to describe part of the letter being drawn in the wrong direction. I thought I was so clever. For instance the E cross-stroke goes from right to left rather than from left to right like, oh, any other Roman cap E in history. R and Q diagonals came from waaaaaaaay on the other side, N goes waaaaaaay around the wrong way before starting the diagonal. "Chrome" letters can branch but these "glass tube" letters don't!

Alas, digitization came along eventually and Fontographer technology followed. Crash went sales of rub-down type, and control of artwork was pirated without my knowledge and beyond my control, which I don't condone but I totally understand.

The first album cover I saw with Quicksilver was Men At Work's first smash LP, then punk pioneer Stiff Records' logo appeared on 45 rpm labels with a clearly Quicksliver-inspired F. For about ten years I, family, and friends collected food packages, posters, took photos of signs, etc. with Quicksliver from around the world. I think it's about the easiest typeface to mishandle ever. Eventually I stopped trying to keep track of it.

Maybe I'm overestimating its popularity now after 30 years (I totally forgot about it for about a decade), but to me seeing it around at all is itself a rave. I can't remember why I Googled "Quicksilver Letraset" a few days ago and what I found was a whole community of sites for font identification and original name lists (where they bothered to accurately credit me as designer which gets me RIGHT HERE). It makes me feel less forgotten even though I don't see royalties.

BTW, I never did, nor did Letraset ask me to, design a lower case version. Feel free to pass along this modest piece of graphic microhistory to any Letraheads.

Dean Morris, May 2007, New York City.

ktinkel
05-29-2007, 12:31 PM
I'm Dean Morris, the designer of the typeface "Quicksilver" that came out in 1976 as part of Letraset's Letragraphica range of rub-down fonts …Hey — many thanks for stopping by.

Nice to hear the full story of a font.

What do you do today? Not type design, I gather! :)

dthomsen8
05-29-2007, 02:39 PM
I'm Dean Morris, the designer of the typeface "Quicksilver" that came out in 1976 as part of Letraset's Letragraphica range of rub-down fonts, the stylishly aggeressive ones in the yellow pages of the catalog. ...

Thank you for the history. I suppose your arrival here in this forum is part of the amazing connections that search engines provide for us today.

Norbert
05-29-2007, 05:20 PM
Yes, thank you Dean.
It's always great to hear about the background of a typeface from the designer himself.

If you don't mind, I might redirect some readers to view your post from another forum I frequent. You Quicksilver has made several appearances there as well.
Norbert

deanmorris_nyc
05-30-2007, 06:30 AM
You're welcome to pass any of this info along.
To answer an earlier question, I was a graphic designer up until about '99 when I subverted to fine art.

ktinkel
05-30-2007, 06:41 AM
I was a graphic designer up until about '99 when I subverted to fine art.Subverted, huh? :) Good for you!