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PeterArnel
10-21-2005, 04:13 PM
Its the Britsh way - we are celebrating this day, talking about Nelson etc , instead of saying how well we beat the French

Robin Springall
10-21-2005, 05:05 PM
Yeah, but it's satisfying to ever-so-gently remind 'em as well!!

dthomsen8
10-22-2005, 04:28 AM
Its the Britsh way - we are celebrating this day, talking about Nelson etc , instead of saying how well we beat the French

Ah, but both the French and the Spanish were beat by Nelson, and for the second time! Remember the Nile! (Some Americans are Anglophiles.)

George
10-22-2005, 05:45 AM
It's kind of interesting to be at a certain web site one second, considering the research before WWII, on energy beams to shoot down aircraft (death rays), and resonance devices to simulate earthquakes for shaking down buildings,-- and the next second to go to a web site, which brings remembrance to the battle of Trafalgar.

http://www.pbs.org/tesla/ll/fbi_06.html

Regards,

George

Richard Waller
10-22-2005, 07:05 AM
Interestingly, the Spanish now are starting to remember Trafalgar Day in respect for the 5000 good men that went to the bottom of the sea.

Robin Springall
10-22-2005, 12:33 PM
Joking aside, that's the best way to do it. War's a pretty dirty mess at the best of times; a remembrance service for the casualties on both/all sides increases understanding and reconciliation between nations.

BigJohnD
10-23-2005, 03:25 PM
And don't forget that in a few days time it's the 400th Anniversary of the foiling the attempted blowing up of the Houses of Parliament:
Gunpowder Plot 400 (http://www.parliament.uk/parliamentary_publications_and_archives/parliamentary_archives/gunpowder_plot_400.cfm)

http://www.biss.no/Fobiss/communitypics/fireworks2.jpg

I'm going to watch the (free!) display by the Marine Lake on Sat 5th Nov:
West Kirby S.C. (http://www.wksc.net/social/viewmonth.asp?viewmonth=11&category=social) :)

fhaber
10-24-2005, 06:50 AM
Curiosity question: Is the locution, "Guy Fawkes' Day" no longer used?

Richard Waller
10-24-2005, 06:56 AM
Curiosity question: Is the locution, "Guy Fawkes' Day" no longer used?All the time here.

November 5th is used as a form of shorthand - everyone knows the date. But for accuravy we should add that we have fireworks from about October all through November, and the pets are hiding under the bed.

George
10-24-2005, 12:04 PM
And don't forget that in a few days time it's the 400th Anniversary of the foiling the attempted blowing up of the Houses of Parliament:

Do the British have any kind of celebration for having burned down the White House???

Regards,

George

dthomsen8
10-24-2005, 01:02 PM
Everyone knows the date? Well, maybe most in England know the date.

But that makes me think of the old joke, "Do the have a Fourth of July in
England?" Yes, what else comes between the 3rd and the 5th?


All the time here.

November 5th is used as a form of shorthand - everyone knows the date. But for accuravy we should add that we have fireworks from about October all through November, and the pets are hiding under the bed.

dthomsen8
10-24-2005, 01:05 PM
Its the Britsh way - we are celebrating this day, talking about Nelson etc , instead of saying how well we beat the French


When did the British Soveriegns give up calling themselves King (or Queen) of France? They did that for centuries! ;)

BigJohnD
10-24-2005, 02:17 PM
When did the British Soveriegns give up calling themselves King (or Queen) of France? They did that for centuries! ;)
Pass. When did they?

The answer is not straightforward, as the British sovereign didn't come into being until the 1707 Act of Union even though James VI of Scotland became James I of England and Scotland in about 1603, after the death of Queen Elizabeth I.

QEI's elder half sister, Queen Mary, had sent an army into France in about 1558, but they only re-captured Calais, and later monarchs were reluctant to continue a war overseas against the various Kings of France to take the rest of France, just claiming the title, as they were involved in serious disputes with the Scots and Roman Catholics (hence Guy Fawkes and his merry bunch of bandits, terrorists in today's language).

So my answer is 1603.

And then there is Ireland.

Michael Rowley
10-24-2005, 02:55 PM
When did the British Soveriegns give up calling themselves King (or Queen) of France?

Never: that's a 'when did you stop beating your wife?' question. The kings of England did of course claim their sovereignty over a large part of France, which I think was at one time bigger than the King of France did. Queen Mary is said to have died 'with Calais engraved on her heart', but she wasn't the queen of Scotland.