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JABTE05
08-31-2005, 09:07 AM
I have my email font set to Times New Roman 12pt (I'm using Entourage for Mac), but each time my email gets sent back and forth, the font gets smaller. What could be the reason for this? How can I fix it?

ktinkel
08-31-2005, 02:09 PM
I have my email font set to Times New Roman 12pt (I'm using Entourage for Mac), but each time my email gets sent back and forth, the font gets smaller. What could be the reason for this? How can I fix it?I don’t use Entourage, so cannot say whether it is doing something to your font size.

But if you are sending messages to Windows users, they may find your fonts too large, and reduce them somehow before replying. (Just guessing here.) Does it always happen? Or only with certain people? If so, maybe you can ask if they are doing anything to cause this.

Out of curiosity: Why do you use Times for online reading? There are good fonts designed for reading on the screen. The most legible are Verdana and Georgia (both of which come with MS Internet Explorer, so you can install it, snag the fonts, and then throw away the browser if you want to).

However, the size problem may not go away. Maybe another Mac Entourage user can enlighten you. I am pretty sure there are some.

annc
08-31-2005, 02:33 PM
I have my email font set to Times New Roman 12pt (I'm using Entourage for Mac), but each time my email gets sent back and forth, the font gets smaller. What could be the reason for this? How can I fix it?I use Entourage, but have it set to turn everything into plain text. This is because Windows users have a bad habit of doing weird things with fonts in their e-mails.

I'll try changing mine to your setup today, and see what happens.

Which version of Office are you using, btw.

Michael Rowley
08-31-2005, 04:00 PM
Ann:

This is because Windows users have a bad habit of doing weird things with fonts in their e-mails

We Windows users will be bringing a suit for unfair discrimination soon. Don't Mac, Unix, etc. users utilize HMTL?

JABTE05
09-01-2005, 07:05 AM
Out of curiosity: Why do you use Times for online reading? There are good fonts designed for reading on the screen. The most legible are Verdana and Georgia (both of which come with MS Internet Explorer, so you can install it, snag the fonts, and then throw away the browser if you want to).

However, the size problem may not go away. Maybe another Mac Entourage user can enlighten you. I am pretty sure there are some.

I've used Verdana before. It doesn't make a difference in terms of the size people see. I've switched to Times because that's what everyone in my company uses, and people seem to have a hard time thinking outside the box.

I've had complaints from both Mac and PC users about the size of my email font.

JABTE05
09-01-2005, 07:06 AM
Which version of Office are you using, btw.

Office 2004

annc
09-01-2005, 01:47 PM
Office 2004That explains why I can't get Times 12 - I'm using Office X. I've asked Elyse, who has Office 2004, to continue the tests I started.

ElyseC
09-02-2005, 01:32 PM
That explains why I can't get Times 12 - I'm using Office X. I've asked Elyse, who has Office 2004, to continue the tests I started.Actually, I'm unclear on what I'm to do to execute these tests. I just replied to your email, but guess I haven't followed this enough to know what I'm supposed to do next.

annc
09-02-2005, 02:39 PM
Actually, I'm unclear on what I'm to do to execute these tests. I just replied to your email, but guess I haven't followed this enough to know what I'm supposed to do next.Angela was sending out e-mails in Times 12, and as people replied, the size got smaller and smaller.

So what I was trying to do was emulate that situation.

ElyseC
09-02-2005, 03:34 PM
Angela was sending out e-mails in Times 12, and as people replied, the size got smaller and smaller.

So what I was trying to do was emulate that situation.OK, so I should try sending HTML email to myself (one account to another), replying back and forth and see what happens.

annc
09-02-2005, 05:19 PM
OK, so I should try sending HTML email to myself (one account to another), replying back and forth and see what happens.Yes, or to me.

ElyseC
09-03-2005, 08:07 AM
Yes, or to me.Ah, got it.

JABTE05
09-08-2005, 07:43 AM
Ah, got it.


Did you get a chance to try it out? Any luck?

ElyseC
09-08-2005, 09:40 AM
Did you get a chance to try it out? Any luck?Well, the only thing I can think of is that your recipients' email software is forcing your message's fonts down size-wise when they click the Reply button, because they have their software set to send HTML messages in a smaller size than in your software. I'm not sure, but I think that's what I'm seeing happen with my test messages.

JABTE05
09-09-2005, 07:36 AM
I found this site that pertains to my problem. http://www.ianag.com/mac/t-644325.html

ElyseC
09-09-2005, 05:05 PM
They described it far better than I did, but that's essentially what I suspected was happening. Glad you found a good explanation.

ktinkel
09-09-2005, 05:31 PM
I found this site that pertains to my problem. http://www.ianag.com/mac/t-644325.htmlOy. That is what I feared.

And I see advice to use points (not pixels) to specify type sizes in HTML.

Points, unfortunately, have no defined meaning on the web. The minute your text goes out into the online world, the point size could mean anything at all. Various platforms and programs redefine it willy-nilly.

If you were talking about a web page (i.e., html for a browser), the best approach would be not to define the type size at all. Let the user defaults figure it out. (If you wanted smaller type for footnotes, say, you could ask for the type to be 85% or 90%, but that would be relative to whatever the reader has set.)

But in e-mail you may not have the choice. Alas. And it is hard to see what to do about it, except not use HTML in e-mail (which I see is not a good option for you).