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ktinkel
08-17-2005, 04:57 PM
I am to have an MRI on Saturday morning, and being an utter ignoramus about such things, wondered if anyone had any advice.

It will be closed; since I am somewhat claustrophobic, I have a prescription for something called Xanax (to be taken an hour before). Guess I will be loopy the rest of the day!

annc
08-17-2005, 05:10 PM
I am to have an MRI on Saturday morning, and being an utter ignoramus about such things, wondered if anyone had any advice.

It will be closed; since I am somewhat claustrophobic, I have a prescription for something called Xanax (to be taken an hour before). Guess I will be loopy the rest of the day!Ah, the doctors love Xanax. A friend once told me that at a doctors' conference he attended once, they put it on the tables at the conference dinner. Apparently it helps either prevent or cure hangovers. <g>

I had an MRI a couple of years ago, but it was only looking at my jaw, so only my head was inside.

Anne Wright
08-17-2005, 07:25 PM
Kathleen, Just take your pill and relax - it is VERY boring!

The only other advice I have is do not count on the MRI finding all that is there. When I injured my shoulder, the doctor tried threapy, injections, etc. to try to avoid surgery since we had no health insurance. Then he suggested an MRI to be sure what the damage was. Well, the MRI report came back "Just a little tearing, nothing serious."

About the time the doctor had predicted he'd be done, he came out to the waiting room to tell my SO that the damage was extensive and rather than arthroscopic, he had to open the shoulder up. Five hours later, I was out of surgery with a completely rebuilt shoulder.

MRIs do not seem to live up to their advertising...IMO
Anne

Stephen Owades
08-17-2005, 08:33 PM
I am to have an MRI on Saturday morning, and being an utter ignoramus about such things, wondered if anyone had any advice.

It will be closed; since I am somewhat claustrophobic, I have a prescription for something called Xanax (to be taken an hour before). Guess I will be loopy the rest of the day!I went through four MRI procedures, looking at my heart, as part of a medical study I participated in earlier this year. I didn't take Xanax or any other drugs, and didn't find the experience overwhelming--but if you are claustrophobic, you may want to take Xanax as suggested.

The one useful piece of advice I can give you is that you do want earplugs. The inside of an MRI machine can be somewhat noisy (banging and buzzing noises), and you'll be happier wearing earplugs. They should offer you compressible foam earplugs at the MRI facility, and take advantage of them!

Good luck with your MRI, and I hope it comes out well. I have four CDs worth of cardiac MRI images to look at (Brigham & Women's Hospital provides CDs of any imaging procedure free for the asking), although they're very hard for a layman to interpret.

Franca
08-17-2005, 10:33 PM
Never had one so don't know a thing, but I guess I'd take both the drugs and the earplugs.... I assume you can't have music in there? For me a headset and a favorite CD would take care of everything - the claustrophobia, weird noises, and the boredom.

Good luck with it - I'm sure you'll do fine!

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 06:43 AM
Kathleen, Just take your pill and relax - it is VERY boring!Seems to be the consensus.

The only other advice I have is do not count on the MRI finding all that is there. … MRIs do not seem to live up to their advertising...IMOYikes — I guess not, in your case anyway!

I wonder if MRIs are being over-sold; people ask for them, and the doctors order them, whether it makes good sense or not.

Mine is not so much diagnostic as to locate exactly where my sciatic nerve is being pinched. Then they will give me an epidural injection based on what they see. I think it is rather routine.

At this point I am just being anxious about being in a tube for half an hour. I generally enjoy technical procedures (found a colonoscopy very interesting, for example). If I weren’t somewhat claustrophobic I don’t think the MRI would bother me, but I hope the pill will get me through.

My orthopedist said something interesting about MRIs (explaining why he didn’t ask for one earlier) — he said they provide too much information, and it can be a challenge to sort the wheat from the chaff. But now that we have tried all the low-tech solutions to no avail, he says this is the logical next step.

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 06:48 AM
I went through four MRI procedures … The one useful piece of advice I can give you is that you do want earplugs. Thanks. That advice I will take! Are the foam ones adequate, do you think?

Good luck with your MRI, and I hope it comes out well. I have four CDs worth of cardiac MRI images to look at (Brigham & Women's Hospital provides CDs of any imaging procedure free for the asking), although they're very hard for a layman to interpret.Thanks. I expect it will be fine.

As I mentioned to Anne, even my orthopedist finds interpreting MRI data to be challenging. But very interesting to think I could get a copy; maybe I will ask.

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 06:50 AM
Never had one so don't know a thing, but I guess I'd take both the drugs and the earplugs.... I assume you can't have music in there? For me a headset and a favorite CD would take care of everything - the claustrophobia, weird noises, and the boredom.That’s a good idea. Suspect it isn’t allowed, but maybe I will ask.

It is only 20 minutes or so; how awful can it be, especially if I take a tranquilizer? Maybe I can just have a little nap! <g>

Although, from what Stephen says, it may be too noisy, even with earplugs.

ElyseC
08-18-2005, 08:38 AM
That’s a good idea. Suspect it isn’t allowed, but maybe I will ask.

It is only 20 minutes or so; how awful can it be, especially if I take a tranquilizer? Maybe I can just have a little nap! <g>

Although, from what Stephen says, it may be too noisy, even with earplugs.If you had a nice little iPod that will work with Bluetooth earbuds/phones, the iPod could remain out of the MRI unit (but close by) and you and the earbuds would be inside.

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 11:42 AM
If you had a nice little iPod that will work with Bluetooth earbuds/phones, the iPod could remain out of the MRI unit (but close by) and you and the earbuds would be inside.Hmmm. No iPod. And it might be a tad excessive to buy one for this 20-minute procedure (not to mention that I would have to learn how to use it and get some music for it in about 24 hours!).

Nice idea, though.

Franca
08-18-2005, 11:48 AM
It is only 20 minutes or so; how awful can it be, especially if I take a tranquilizer? Maybe I can just have a little nap! <g>Napping is good, too!

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 11:51 AM
Napping is good, too!Yeah, so long as the earplugs drown out most of the noise.

Fortunately, it is soon (Saturday morning), so I don’t have time to obsess to much over what might happen! <g>

terrie
08-18-2005, 12:42 PM
I had one years ago at the suggestion of the audiologist I went to for my initial hearing loss diagnosis.

I don't want to freak you out or anything but just give you a heads-up...there is a split second (and I do mean quick!) as they start the bed you're lying on into the machine where it's dark and then you are into the lighted portion. I found the transition a bit disconcerting because they hadn't warned me about that so be prepared and just relax.

Stephen is right about the noise. I'm sure they will give you earplugs. Make sure they do.

On the whole, as everyone has said, it's pretty boring...my scan took about 20 minutes...

I don't think you could use a cd (or ipod) in there because think about it...it's magnetic...'-}}

Terrie

Michael Rowley
08-18-2005, 03:10 PM
Terrie:

Stephen is right about the noise

I don't see that magnetic-resonance imaging should be any noisier than computer-aided tomography: both involve heavy machinery rotating about you, and when you take that into account, you just ignore the noise. After all, they might have decided to keep the machine static and rotated you instead.

If you can put up with a Dyson cleaner, a scan is nothing.

ElyseC
08-18-2005, 03:39 PM
Hmmm. No iPod. And it might be a tad excessive to buy one for this 20-minute procedure (not to mention that I would have to learn how to use it and get some music for it in about 24 hours!).

Nice idea, though.When/if you do get an iPod, no need to buy anything right away from iTunes Music Store, just feed your favorite CDs into iTunes and play those on the shiny new gizmo.

I don't yet have an iPod myself, but have fed all sorts of CDs into iTunes and play the music from there while I work. When I do get rich enough to get the photo model I want, I don't know that I'll get anything from the store, because my CD collection serves me well right now.

Shane Stanley
08-18-2005, 04:16 PM
If I weren’t somewhat claustrophobic I don’t think the MRI would bother me, but I hope the pill will get me through.

My mother is badly claustrophobic -- she panics in lifts and all sorts of stuff. But she said she didn't find hers too bad.

Shane

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 05:40 PM
I don't want to freak you out or anything …Okay. I do appreciate the warning, however.

I don't think you could use a cd (or ipod) in there because think about it...it's magnetic...'-}}I had the same thought! (Great minds and all that. <g>)

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 05:57 PM
When/if you do get an iPod …Haven’t even considered it.

I hardly ever go anywhere, and am surrounded by all sorts of music sources.

Maybe one day, but that is one gadget I seem to be immune to.

ktinkel
08-18-2005, 05:58 PM
If you can put up with a Dyson cleaner, a scan is nothing.That sort of noise is why I got a Miele vacuum! <g>

Andrew B.
08-18-2005, 09:03 PM
I've been through several different kinds of scans over the past few years. The ones where I was on a conveyer were like big doughnuts, not like chambers. Still, I know what it is like to get nervous. I am one of the worst patients when it comes to this. So I take whatever they offer to calm me. But aside from the nervousness leading up to these, the process is pretty ho hum.

Franca
08-18-2005, 09:48 PM
Haven’t even considered it.

I hardly ever go anywhere, and am surrounded by all sorts of music sources.

Maybe one day, but that is one gadget I seem to be immune to.Same here. If I couldn't use one during a boring or annoying medical procedure I don't know when else I would!

Richard Waller
08-19-2005, 01:57 AM
Our local hospital here has one of the new open-fronted MRI scanners so you can have someone old your hand, or chat to you. You have to lay still of course. The new ones are expensive - about 700,000 UKP but they tell me they will reduce in price when demand builds.
I think they would ban anything metal, like an Ipod. And the Magnet would screw it up anyway.

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 05:36 AM
I've been through several different kinds of scans over the past few years. The ones where I was on a conveyer were like big doughnuts, not like chambers. Still, I know what it is like to get nervous. I am one of the worst patients when it comes to this. So I take whatever they offer to calm me. But aside from the nervousness leading up to these, the process is pretty ho hum.Thanks, Andrew. I do not normally get too anxious, but have had a couple of awful attacks of claustrophobia in the past few years, so think I will opt for the pill.

Ho-hum will be fine. For 20 minutes, anyway! <g>

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 05:39 AM
Our local hospital here has one of the new open-fronted MRI scanners so you can have someone old your hand, or chat to you. You have to lay still of course.I could have opted for an open one, which would have been adequate for this particular procedure.

But the doctor said if things progress further, I would probably need another one, in a closed unit, which is somehow more accurate or somehow better (he wasn’t specific or I didn’t understand, anyway). So I figured I would rather have one than two of these tests.

The open units also have longer waiting lists.

ElyseC
08-19-2005, 10:56 AM
I have lots of good music sources, too, but anticipate a need for digital recording that can be transferred quickly and easily to my systems, then burned to CD for archiving.

I'm thinking also of eventually returning to studies and recording and playing back classes would be helpful. See, I may decide to finish my double major in Spanish and Portuguese, then add another language or two I've been considering. I got the idea from one of the Ivy League schools (forget which right now) that issued all incoming freshman iPods and professors recorded lectures, making them available for download shortly after class dismissed. Pretty cool use of the technology, I think.

terrie
08-19-2005, 11:50 AM
>>kt: Okay. I do appreciate the warning, however.

You're welcome...that split second of darkness was just a bit disconcerting...

Oh! One thing that no one has mentioned is that they give you a little thingie with a button to push if you get freaked out and they would pull you out immediately...as I mentioned, I had my MRI years ago but I would assume they still give you the "panic button"...

On a funny note, when the doctor's office was making the arrangements for my MRI appointment the doctor's receptionist told me the MRI center wanted to know if I were claustrophobic...

I told her that was a lot like asking do you laugh at dirty jokes--depends on the joke...'-}}

Terrie

terrie
08-19-2005, 11:52 AM
>>michael: both involve heavy machinery rotating about you, and when you take that into account, you just ignore the noise

It isn't the rotating...it's the banging that is so loud...noise at that level is damaging to your hearing...earplugs are a protection...

Terrie

Michael Rowley
08-19-2005, 12:10 PM
Terrie:

it's the banging that is so loud

I know, I've heard it (I was having my head examined), but it's tolerable, at least to male ears, which is more than I can say about the the noise of heavy metal from people's cars.

terrie
08-19-2005, 12:39 PM
LOL!!!

Terrie

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 01:06 PM
… the doctor's receptionist told me the MRI center wanted to know if I were claustrophobic...

I told her that was a lot like asking do you laugh at dirty jokes--depends on the joke...'-}}Giggle.

This morning’s New York Times had a front-page story about accidents with MRIs, and photographs of lamps and equipment sucked in by the magnets, and a couple of horror stories about injured patients. Fortunately, I am not superstitious, and do not think the timing any anything to do with me!

In the end the article’s main point was that MRIs are less regulated than dental x-ray machines; and that problems only need to be reported if they are problems with the equipment and not with its use. Oh, and that some places try to save money by not having patients change into a gown (or at least be investigated thoroughly for presence of anything metallic). Yikes.

terrie
08-19-2005, 01:54 PM
>>kt: Oh, and that some places try to save money by not having patients change into a gown (or at least be investigated thoroughly for presence of anything metallic). Yikes.


Indeed...I didn't have to change clothes but now I do remember them having me remove my ear rings, watch, etc and being asked about anything metallic...

I was very impressed with the staff at this MRI center...they were very calm and professional which helped to reassure me and reduce any anxiety I felt...

Terrie

annc
08-19-2005, 02:20 PM
...or at least be investigated thoroughly for presence of anything metallic. Yikes.My maxillo-facial surgeon showed me my scans, and you should have seen the first slice, where it was looking at my mouth in general. All that amalgam and gold turned the image into a mass of jagged starbursts, as if someone was practising for a career writing one of those old comic strips where people got punched up. Really impessive, it was. <g>

ElyseC
08-19-2005, 03:38 PM
(or at least be investigated thoroughly for presence of anything metallic). Yikes.How do they deal with rings that cannot be removed from fingers? Many people have wedding rings, for instance, that they've never taken off and wouldn't come off if they tried.

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 04:45 PM
I didn't have to change clothes but now I do remember them having me remove my ear rings, watch, etc and being asked about anything metallic...

I was very impressed with the staff at this MRI center...they were very calm and professional which helped to reassure me and reduce any anxiety I felt...I feel that way about most of the medical people I encounter lately (and there have been a ton of them! just look at my list of co-pays!).

Not so much in the doctor’s office — they often seem harried. But at the various services that draw blood, take x-rays, the physical therapists, and so on, the demeanor is very reassuring, not to mention civil. Makes sense — it can’t be much fun for them to have quivering and cranky subjects!

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 04:49 PM
My maxillo-facial surgeon showed me my scans, and you should have seen the first slice, where it was looking at my mouth in general. All that amalgam and gold turned the image into a mass of jagged starbursts, as if someone was practising for a career writing one of those old comic strips where people got punched up. Really impessive, it was. <g>Fortunately, they are not doing my teeth!

I suppose they will tell me what to do when I get there. But I will not wear earrings, and will leave my glasses and wedding ring with Jack. They are supposedly only doing the lumbar region and so far as I know nothing about that is metal.

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 04:52 PM
How do they deal with rings that cannot be removed from fingers? Many people have wedding rings, for instance, that they've never taken off and wouldn't come off if they tried.Dunno, but couple of thoughts: the magnetic stuff mainly reacts to iron, steel, and so on, not gold or silver.

Second, they focus on various parts of the body. Wonder if they ever look at hands. Third, if is urgent to remove a ring, they can easily cut it off.

But I suspect it isn’t an issue.

annc
08-19-2005, 04:53 PM
Fortunately, they are not doing my teeth!

I suppose they will tell me what to do when I get there. But I will not wear earrings, and will leave my glasses and wedding ring with Jack. They are supposedly only doing the lumbar region and so far as I know nothing about that is metal.Yes, I'm sure they won't take any more images than they need to, and will also give you clear instructions on what to do.

Good luck with it!

ktinkel
08-19-2005, 04:56 PM
Good luck with it!Xanax — do you know what is a small or large dose?

I have been given three 0.5mg tablets, with instructions to take two or three of them an hour before the procedure.

What the heck is that about? How do I know? Seems to me that any sensible person would take two and hope for the best!

annc
08-19-2005, 05:09 PM
Xanax — do you know what is a small or large dose?

I have been given three 0.5mg tablets, with instructions to take two or three of them an hour before the procedure.

What the heck is that about? How do I know? Seems to me that any sensible person would take two and hope for the best!The only time I ever took diazepam was over 30 years ago, but I seem to recall that I was on a very low dose - 0.25mg a day. A friend was taking a high dose at 1.0mg a day.

If you're not accustomed to that stuff, then the two tablets should be enough, I would think. Better to suffer a little anxiety than feel over-dosed, is how I think of these things.

Anne Wright
08-19-2005, 06:50 PM
Kathleen, If they are just doing your lower back, ask if they can put you in feet first. That is what I had them do when they did my knee and the machine only enclosed up to the tops of my thighs. Of course when they did my shoulder, that was not an option, but it did not bother all that badly.

The ends of the tube are open so it is not all that confining. The worst problem is that I am now a large person and the tube is not all that big around <g> But if you are worried about it, take the Xanax. For one thing, you have to stay in one position for a long time and that is easier if your muscles are relaxed so you just relax into their wedges.

Oh and even if you are not cold when you go in, let them give you a blanket. I got very cold during the knee MRI. I don't remember about that during the shoulder but it was not as long a procedure. The knee took 45 minutes.

Anne

ktinkel
08-20-2005, 05:10 AM
Kathleen, If they are just doing your lower back, ask if they can put you in feet first. I wondered if that might be possible! Thanks for the suggestion.

… even if you are not cold when you go in, let them give you a blanket. I got very cold during the knee MRI. I don't remember about that during the shoulder but it was not as long a procedure. The knee took 45 minutes.They say this should take 20 minutes. No idea how accurate they are. But thanks for that suggestion too.

I should know for myself how this goes in a couple of hours.

ktinkel
08-20-2005, 05:12 AM
My mother is badly claustrophobic -- she panics in lifts and all sorts of stuff. But she said she didn't find hers too bad.I am not that bad, but think I will take the pills anyway. If I were sure that they would send me in feet first, as Anne suggests, I might skip them, but what the heck? <g>

terrie
08-20-2005, 10:36 AM
>>elyse: How do they deal with rings that cannot be removed from fingers? Many people have wedding rings, for instance, that they've never taken off and wouldn't come off if they tried.

It might depend on what area of the body was being scanned...I know people who have Cochlear Implants cannot have an MRI done--there is a piece of metal placed in the head as part of the surgery...

My guess is that they wouldn't be able to do the MRI if the ring cannot come off...

Terrie

terrie
08-20-2005, 10:40 AM
>>kt: I feel that way about most of the medical people I encounter lately

That's good...I think you're right about doctor's offices being much more harried...

Terrie

Susie
08-20-2005, 06:43 PM
>>My guess is that they wouldn't be able to do the MRI if the ring cannot come off...

Terrie

I had an open MRI, and although they had me remove my gold necklace, they let me leave my ring on. It's a good thing, as I don't think I could even pry it off.

ktinkel
08-21-2005, 06:13 AM
All done. The MRI was short, and I was sent through head first, but that put my head about 6 inches from the open far end of the unit, where fresh air blew. They gave me headphones playing a local easy listening radio station; didn’t really matter, because although the headphones did reduce the clamor in the machine, it was still obtrusive enough that the radio has hardly listenable.

I ended up taking 1-1/2 of the Xanax tablets; they didn’t make me too goofy but after we got home and had a lovely lunch of falafel from the middle-eastern deli, I fell asleep for almost two hours. Sort of the same reaction I have to oral anti-histamines.

Not quite a tempest in a teapot (I would just as soon not have to do that too often!), but not an enormously big deal, either. Thanks to all for the advice and good descriptions, however. Made it much easier.

Stephen Owades
08-21-2005, 09:40 AM
Open MRI machines have less powerful magnetic fields than closed ones, so they produce less detailed images. The basic measure of an MRI machine is its field strength, measured in Tesla units, and the higher the better for image quality.

As for metals, I had EKG leads on my body during the MRI, since they were imaging my heart and needed to synchronize the images with the heartbeats. The conventional sticky patches and wires could not be used, and the MRI folks attached special (and expensive) carbon-fiber patches and wires instead. Those "wires" lead to a special transceiver box, also made of non-magnetic materials, which then sent the signal out via fiber-optic cables. The avoidance of magnetic metals is real and important. I have heard of MRI facilities that provide music over headphones, but I suspect they use the all-plastic air-tube kind that you used to find on airplanes. No iPod or CD player, or conventional headphones, anywhere near an MRI machine.

Have a look at http://www.simplyphysics.com/ if you want to learn more about how MRI works and what to keep in mind regarding MRI safety.

Molly/CA
08-21-2005, 10:25 AM
Kathleen, have you had Xanax before? If not, and there's time, I'd suggest you take one before you go in for the MRI, to see what kind of reaction you have to it before being stuck with both the tunnel and the pill at once.

I take my Walkman CD or tape player and headphones and have now used it through many dire episodes, scans, and procedures and find it helps immensely. Cuts pain for me by at least 30%, for one thing. (I have weird reactions to almost all so-called "tranquilizers" and painkillers and have learned to refuse them or demand stuff I know works.) When they did my shoulder (torn rotator cuff ligament) some of the positions for the necessary views became quite excruciating and I'm sure we'd have had to do fewer retakes if I'd discovered the Walkman Technique then.

A lot depends on who's ordering the MRI and who does it. The orthopedist that was in charge of the shoulder is terrific (Stephen Isono, for anyone who happens to live in the SF Bay Area --he's in Oakland) and (a) ordered the right views (b) didn't leave the reading to the radiology place's guy, had me get films and bring them to him. Also, the crew was conscientious and took the blurred (or whatever) views over until they got a clear one.

I agree that when the average family practitioner orders an MRI the results may be worse than useless --also when the kind of orthopedist/ neurosurgeon etc. who diagnoses you from across the room orders an MRI or anything else. Maybe the criterion should be the Isono Standard: if the doctor tells you to have the PICTURES sent or hand-carried by you, and if he/she puts them up and explains them to you, you may have a fair chance that what an MRI can do it has done. (And that the doctor is capable of carrying on to find the problem.)

Audio tapes work best for me --the new Harry Potter? Or any HP? The PBS interview with the reader had clips and I thought he was marvelous.

And lots of luck, and don't give up. A friend whose back got farkled in an auto accident went through quite a few doctors before she got a good diagnosis and the final bit of therapy that got her back on a horse without cripplilng spasms at anything above a walk.

Anne Wright
08-21-2005, 10:53 AM
Kathleen, I'm glad it went OK and that it is over! I hope that your doctor gets enough information to help with your sciatica, too.
Anne

ktinkel
08-21-2005, 11:13 AM
I hope that your doctor gets enough information to help with your sciatica, too.Me, too!!! Thanks for all your advice.

terrie
08-21-2005, 11:42 AM
>>susie: they let me leave my ring on

Interesting...glad they let you do that...

Terrie

terrie
08-21-2005, 11:43 AM
Glad it went ok...

Terrie

Candy Jens
08-21-2005, 12:26 PM
Do you have an iron ring <g>?? Anything non-magnetic should be ok - as in brass zippers or belt buckles etc. Therre are even differences in stainless steel - some is magnetic, some not.

Candy

ktinkel
08-21-2005, 12:34 PM
Do you have an iron ring <g>?? Anything non-magnetic should be ok - as in brass zippers or belt buckles etc. Therre are even differences in stainless steel - some is magnetic, some not.Actually, they do require you to remove jewelry. According to the article in the Times, there is some sort of problem with many metals.

Not titanium, evidently, as my mouth is full of that, and there was no problem.

annc
08-21-2005, 01:27 PM
Do you have an iron ring <g>?? Anything non-magnetic should be ok - as in brass zippers or belt buckles etc. Therre are even differences in stainless steel - some is magnetic, some not.Having seen what my amalgam and gold fillings (many, many of them) did to the images taken during my scan, i can understand why people are asked to remove all jewellery. Interference is far too mild a word to describe the huge flashes that extended over almost the entire image.

ktinkel
08-21-2005, 04:02 PM
Having seen what my amalgam and gold fillings (many, many of them) did to the images taken during my scan, i can understand why people are asked to remove all jewellery. Interference is far too mild a word to describe the huge flashes that extended over almost the entire image.Yeah. There is something going on beyond “mere” magnetic interference.

curveto
08-25-2005, 04:25 PM
I am to have an MRI on Saturday morning, and being an utter ignoramus about such things, wondered if anyone had any advice.

It will be closed; since I am somewhat claustrophobic, I have a prescription for something called Xanax (to be taken an hour before). Guess I will be loopy the rest of the day!
Here's hoping you didn't get any ferrous body piercings when you were at Berkeley.

;)

ktinkel
08-25-2005, 04:53 PM
Here's hoping you didn't get any ferrous body piercings when you were at Berkeley.

;)Hah! I was at Berkeley (and at Reed, for that matter) long before body piercings were anything other than anthropological field studies! <g>

They did look to see if my jeans had rivets (no, on purpose) and my bra had metal snaps (no, but they didn’t believe it) before pushing me into the tunnel.

Susie
08-25-2005, 08:00 PM
No, not an iron ring, but it is a very thin band. They did remove my necklace, and I had to change into scrubs and no shoes. Fortunately, it was winter time, so I kept my socks on, otherwise I would have had frostbite. It was very cold in there. They ended up giving me a blanket for my legs.

ktinkel
08-26-2005, 08:38 AM
Kathleen, have you had Xanax before? If not, and there's time, I'd suggest you take one before you go in for the MRI, to see what kind of reaction you have to it before being stuck with both the tunnel and the pill at once.I ended up by taking 1-1/2 tablets, and scarcely noticed the effect (well, except for being overcome by an instant-onset nap right after lunch!). Anyway, the MRI tube was short enough that I could sense light and air at the head end, so was merely uncomfortable in the small space rather than claustrophobic.

I take my Walkman CD or tape player and headphones …They gave me headphones with a local radio station playing, and I am sure it helped with muffling the loud noises made by the machine, but the contents gave me no particular joy! I asked if they could find some Bach or Janice Joplin, but the kind (young) woman running the thing looked completely mystified, as if she wasn’t sure what I was asking for!

A lot depends on who's ordering the MRI and who does it. … Also, the crew was conscientious and took the blurred (or whatever) views over until they got a clear one.I seem to have lucked out. My orthopedist sent me to the local hospital (around the corner from his office); they had to redo one set, so did. And a radiologist there read the data and gave him a report. I also got a set of films that I took to him and will take to the place that will do the epidural injection.

And lots of luck, and don't give up. A friend whose back got farkled in an auto accident went through quite a few doctors before she got a good diagnosis and the final bit of therapy that got her back on a horse without cripplilng spasms at anything above a walk.No fear of that! This isn’t a useful way to live at all (especially as walking and sleeping — or lying/sitting for extended periods for any reason — are what cause the most pain)!

Thanks for your message. Somehow missed it until today.

BigJohnD
08-30-2005, 12:52 PM
I'm not sure if I've mentioned it here before but my daughter (almost 18) has suffered from seizures for the last 5 or so years.

Thanks to many MRI scans on her head to locate and identify the tumour, she has had now had it successfully physically removed. She had her skull cut open, the tumour lasered away and her skull stapled back up. She has a scan every couple of months to ensure all is well, which it is. She has not had a seizure since the op (March 05) and is normal expensive and infuriating teenager.

I can't speak too highly of the Walton Centre in Liverpool - http://www.thewaltoncentre.co.uk/

The MRI scan may seem intimidating, but it does do the biz.

ktinkel
08-30-2005, 01:40 PM
Open MRI machines have less powerful magnetic fields than closed ones, so they produce less detailed images.… Have a look at http://www.simplyphysics.com/ if you want to learn more about how MRI works and what to keep in mind regarding MRI safety.Thanks for that. (Not sure how I missed this message last week, but I did.)

Like so many things, it was much easier in reality than in the prospect!

ktinkel
08-30-2005, 01:42 PM
I'm not sure if I've mentioned it here before but my daughter (almost 18) has suffered from seizures for the last 5 or so years.

Thanks to many MRI scans on her head to locate and identify the tumour, she has had now had it successfully physically removed. How awful for your daughter, especially when she was just a kid. Very good to hear it all worked.

The MRI scan may seem intimidating, but it does do the biz.Yes — it does seem to be an incredible tool. The amount of detail in the MRI images compared to an old-fashioned x-ray is incredible.